Literature Collection

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References

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Articles

1200+

Grey Literature

3700+

Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 9,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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41
"Painting a picture of the client": implementing the Addiction Severity Index in community treatment programs
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. E. Spear, A. H. Brown, R. A. Rawson
Year: 2005
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: This article discusses the implementation of the Drug Evaluation Network System (DENS) version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) among substance abuse treatment providers in Los Angeles County. Thirty-two trained and certified treatment professionals from 14 programs participated in focus group interviews about their use of and experiences with the ASI. All 14 programs were currently administering the ASI at the time of the study. Qualitative interviews revealed variation among the programs in terms of when staff administered the ASI and how they used it in clinical care. Although the ASI creates a comprehensive picture of substance-abusing patients and their functioning, the timing of its administration seems to significantly affect the usefulness of the information. The findings illustrate the importance of practicality, flexibility, and ongoing training for the successful implementation of evidence-based practices.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
42
"People just don't understand their role in it." Collaboration and coordination of care for service users with complex and severe mental health problems
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Eva Biringer, Oddbjørn Hove, Øivind Johnsen, Haldis Økland Lier
Year: 2021
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
43
"Progress and Promise" Podcast Series
Type: Web Resource
Authors: National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education
Year: 2017
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Grey Literature See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

45
"Study protocol for a randomized control trial to investigate the effectiveness of an 8-week mindfulness-integrated cognitive behavior therapy (MiCBT) transdiagnostic group intervention for primary care patients": Correction
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Sarah Francis, Frances Shawyer, Bruno Cayoun, Joanne Enticott, Graham Meadows
Year: 2020
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
46
"That's why they call it practice".
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Colleen T. Fogarty, Larry B. Mauksch
Year: 2014
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
47
"The Only Reason I Am Willing to Do It at All": Evaluation of VA's SUpporting Primary care Providers in Opioid Risk reduction and Treatment (SUPPORT) Center
Type: Journal Article
Authors: E. C. Williams, M. C. Frost, A. N. Danner, A. M. K. Lott, C. E. Achtmeyer, C. L. Hood, C. A. Malte, A. J. Saxon, E. J. Hawkins
Year: 2024
Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: Medication treatment for opioid use disorder (MOUD) is effective and recommended for outpatient settings. We implemented and evaluated the SUpporting Primary care Providers in Opioid Risk reduction and Treatment (SUPPORT) Center-a quality improvement partnership to implement stepped care for MOUD in 2 Veterans Health Administration (VA) primary care (PC) clinics. METHODS: SUPPORT provided a dedicated clinical team (nurse practitioner prescriber and social worker) and stepped care ([1] identification, assessment, referral; [2] MOUD induction; [3] stabilization; and [4] maintenance supporting PC providers [PCPs] to initiate and/or sustain treatment) coupled with ongoing internal facilitation (consultation, trainings, informatics support). Qualitative interviews with stakeholders (PCPs and patients) and meeting notes identified barriers and facilitators to implementation. Electronic health record and patient tracking data measured reach, adoption, and implementation outcomes descriptively. RESULTS: SUPPORT's implementation barriers included the need for an X-waiver, VA's opioid tapering policies, patient and PCP knowledge gaps and PCP discomfort, and logistical compatibility and sustainability challenges for clinics. SUPPORT's dedicated clinical staff, ongoing internal facilitation, and high patient and PCP satisfaction were key facilitators. SUPPORT (January 2019 to September 2021) trained 218 providers; 63 received X-waivers, and 23 provided MOUD (10.5% of those trained). SUPPORT provided care to 167 patients, initiated MOUD for 33, and provided education and naloxone to 72 (all = 0 in year before launch). CONCLUSIONS: SUPPORT reached many PCPs and patients and resulted in small increases in MOUD prescribing and high levels of stakeholder satisfaction. Dedicated clinical staff was key to observed successes. Although resource-intensive, SUPPORT offers a potential model for outpatient MOUD provision.

Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
48
"The post-COVID era": challenges in the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD) after the pandemic
Type: Journal Article
Authors: H. López-Pelayo, H. J. Aubin, C. Drummond, G. Dom, F. Pascual, J. Rehm, R. Saitz, E. Scafato, A. Gual
Year: 2020
Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Citizens affected by substance use disorders are high-risk populations for both SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19-related mortality. Relevant vulnerabilities to COVID-19 in people who suffer substance use disorders are described in previous communications. The COVID-19 pandemic offers a unique opportunity to reshape and update addiction treatment networks. MAIN BODY: Renewed treatment systems should be based on these seven pillars: (1) telemedicine and digital solutions, (2) hospitalization at home, (3) consultation-liaison psychiatric and addiction services, (4) harm-reduction facilities, (5) person-centered care, (6) promote paid work to improve quality of life in people with substance use disorders, and (7) integrated addiction care. The three "best buys" of the World Health Organization (reduce availability, increase prices, and a ban on advertising) are still valid. Additionally, new strategies must be implemented to systematically deal with (a) fake news concerning legal and illegal drugs and (b) controversial scientific information. CONCLUSION: The heroin pandemic four decades ago was the last time that addiction treatment systems were updated in many western countries. A revised and modernized addiction treatment network must include improved access to care, facilitated where appropriate by technology; more integrated care with addiction specialists supporting non-specialists; and reducing the stigma experienced by people with SUDs.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
49
"They're Doing Something That Actually No One Else Can Do"?
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Melissa K. Mayer, Diana M. Urlanb, Laura Guzman-Corrales, Sarah D. Kowitt, Christopher M. Shea, Edwin B. Fisher
Year: 2016
Publication Place: Baltimore, Maryland
Topic(s):
General Literature See topic collection
51
"We'll be able to take care of ourselves" - A qualitative study of client attitudes toward implementing buprenorphine treatment at syringe services programs
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. Frost, S. Deutsch, S. Brown, E. Lemien, C. O. Cunningham, A. D. Fox
Year: 2021
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

Syringe services programs (SSPs) complement substance use disorder treatment in providing services that improve the health of people who use drugs (PWUD). Buprenorphine treatment is an effective underutilized opioid use disorder treatment. Regulations allow buprenorphine prescribing from office-based settings, potentially including SSPs although few studies have examined this approach. Our objective was to assess the attitudes among PWUD toward the potential introduction of buprenorphine treatment in an SSP. Methods: In this qualitative study, we recruited 34 participants who were enrolled at a New York City-based SSP to participate in one of seven focus group sessions. The focus group facilitators prompted participants to share their thoughts in five domains: attitudes toward (1) medical clinics; (2) harm reduction in general; (3) SSP-based buprenorphine treatment; (4) potential challenges of SSP-based treatment; and (5) logistical considerations of an SSP-based buprenorphine treatment program. Four researchers analyzed focus group transcripts using thematic analysis. Results: Of the 34 participants, most were white (68%), over the age of 40 years old (56%), and had previously tried buprenorphine (89%). Common themes were: 1) The SSP is a supportive community for people who use drugs; 2) Participants felt less stigmatized at the SSP than in general medical settings; 3) Offering buprenorphine treatment could change the SSP's culture; and 4) SSP participants receiving buprenorphine may be tempted to divert their medication. Participants offered suggestions for a slow intentional introduction of buprenorphine treatment at the SSP including structured appointments, training medical providers in harm reduction, and program eligibility criteria. Conclusion: Overall, participants expressed enthusiasm for onsite buprenorphine treatment at SSPs. Research on SSP-based buprenorphine treatment should investigate standard buprenorphine treatment outcomes but also any effects on the program itself and medication diversion. Implementation should consider cultural and environmental aspects of the SSP and consult program staff and participants.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
52
"What else can we do?"-Provider perspectives on treatment-resistant depression in late life
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. E. Hamm, J. F. Karp, E. Lenard, A. Dawdani, H. Lavretsky, E. J. Lenze, B. H. Mulsant, C. F. Reynolds, S. P. Roose, P. J. Brown
Year: 2022
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
54
"You are not clean until you're not on anything": Perceptions of medication-assisted treatment in rural Appalachia
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Emma L. Richard, Christine A. Schalkoff, Hannah M. Piscalko, Daniel L. Brook, Adams L. Sibley, Kathryn E. Lancaster, William C. Miller, Vivian F. Go
Year: 2020
Publication Place: Amsterdam
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
55
“a lot of people call it liquid handcuffs” – barriers and enablers to the opioid replacement therapy in a rural area
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Penelope Wood, Cynthia Opie, Joseph Tucci, Richard Franklin, Karen Anderson
Year: 2018
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
56
“A lot of people call it liquid handcuffs”—Barriers and enablers to opioid replacement therapy in a rural area
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Penelope Wood, Cynthia Opie, Joseph Tucci, Richard Franklin, Karen Anderson
Year: 2019
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
57
“Can we have a little humanity here?”: Patient perspectives on the impact of a standardized care process for patients who use opioids for the management of chronic pain
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Katherine Montag Schafer, Rebekah Pratt, Jason Ricco, Kathryn Brown
Year: 2022
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
58
“Every structure we're taught goes out the window”: General practitioners' experiences of providing help for patients with emotional concerns'
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Daisy Parker, Richard Byng, Chris Dickens, Rose McCabe
Year: 2020
Publication Place: Oxford
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
59
“Here comes the junkies,” opioid replacement therapy in rural Australia
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Cynthia Ann Opie, Penelope Wood, Helen Mary Haines, Richard C. Franklin
Year: 2021
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
60
“I didn't feel like a number”: The impact of nurse care managers on the provision of buprenorphine treatment in primary care settings
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Nisha Beharie, Marissa Kaplan-Dobbs, Adelya Urmanche, Denise Paone, Alex Harocopos
Year: 2021
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection