Literature Collection

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Grey Literature

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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 8,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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1
"Caring About Me": a pilot framework to understand patient-centered care experience in integrated care - a qualitative study
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. Youssef, D. Wiljer, M. Mylopoulos, R. Maunder, S. Sockalingam
Year: 2020
Source:
Youssef A, Wiljer D, Mylopoulos M, Maunder R, Sockalingam S. "Caring About Me": a pilot framework to understand patient-centered care experience in integrated care - a qualitative study. Bmj Open 2020;10. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-034970.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
2
"Cognitive behavioral therapy for primary care depression and anxiety: A secondary meta-analytic review using robust variance estimation in meta-regression": Correction
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Anao Zhang, Lindsay A. Bornheimer, Addie Weaver, Cynthia Franklin, Audrey Hang Hai, Samantha Guz, Li Shen
Year: 2020
Source:
Zhang A, Bornheimer LA, Weaver A, Franklin C, Hai AH, Guz S, et al. "Cognitive behavioral therapy for primary care depression and anxiety: A secondary meta-analytic review using robust variance estimation in meta-regression": Correction. Journal Of Behavioral Medicine 2020;43:339+. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10865-019-00132-2.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
3
"Dying is Not a Fear": Teen and Parent Perspectives on Messaging to Prevent Crystal Meth Use Among Teens in Rural North Idaho
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. R. Skeer, D. M. Landy, J. M. Abrahams, J. Towers
Year: 2021
Source:
Skeer MR, Landy DM, Abrahams JM, Towers J. "Dying is Not a Fear": Teen and Parent Perspectives on Messaging to Prevent Crystal Meth Use Among Teens in Rural North Idaho. Prevention Science : The Official Journal Of The Society For Prevention Research 2021;22:579-589, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11121-021-01215-w.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

Crystal methamphetamine ("meth") use is on the rise in the USA, having devastating effects on individuals and communities. Innovative prevention strategies are therefore critical. Through an exploratory qualitative study, we examined the perspectives and experiences of teenagers and parents around meth prevention messaging formats and strategies. Teens and adults were recruited through middle and high schools, libraries, local sporting events, and word of mouth in three communities in North Idaho, May-September 2016. Guided by the theoretical framework of the Extended Parallel Process Model, we conducted focus groups and small group interviews (three teen; two adults). Using a deductive content analytic approach, we developed teen- and adult-specific codebooks, analyzed the transcripts with NVivo 12-Plus, and identified themes. Teens and adults were all acutely aware of meth use in their communities, personally knowing people who were addicted to meth, and all understood the oral ("meth mouth") and physical ("crank bugs") consequences of meth use. Three primary themes were identified, which focused on the effects of, addiction to, and messaging around crystal meth use. For teens and adults, images illustrating the effects of meth were least effective if they appeared unrealistic or comical. Teens resonated most with messages focusing on pain and vanity (bad teeth and breath), and there was consensus that showing teens images simulating changes in their appearance over time as a result of meth use in a clinical setting would be an effective prevention strategy. Teens and adults who had exposure to meth addiction in North Idaho felt that prevention messages focused on meth are imperative, given its high prevalence and deleterious effects. Future work will entail developing and testing a communication-based meth prevention strategy along with tailored messaging that can be used with teens in dental settings.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
4
"I didn't want to be on Suboxone at first…" - Ambivalence in Perinatal Substance Use Treatment
Type: Journal Article
Authors: B. Ostrach, C. Leiner
Year: 2019
Source:
Ostrach B, Leiner C. "I didn't want to be on Suboxone at first…" - Ambivalence in Perinatal Substance Use Treatment. Journal Of Addiction Medicine 2019;13:264-271, . https://doi.org/10.1097/ADM.0000000000000491.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this article are to present findings from recent qualitative research with patients in a combined perinatal substance use treatment program in Central Appalachia, and to describe and analyze participants' ambivalence about medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD), in the context of widespread societal stigma and judgement. METHODS: We conducted research in a comprehensive outpatient perinatal substance use treatment program housed in a larger obstetric practice serving a large rural, Central Appalachian region. The program serves patients across the spectrum of substance use disorders but specifically offers medication-assisted treatment to perinatal patients with OUD. We purposively and opportunistically sampled patients receiving prescriptions for buprenorphine or buprenorphine-naloxone dual product, along with prenatal care and other services. Through participant-observation and semi-structured interviews, we gathered qualitative data from 27 participants, in a total of 31 interviews. We analyzed transcripts of interviews and fieldnotes using modified Grounded Theory. RESULTS: Participants in a combined perinatal substance use treatment program value supportive, non-judgmental care but report ambivalence about medication, within structural and institutional contexts of criminalized, stigmatized substance use and close scrutiny of their pregnancies. Women are keenly aware of the social and public consequences for themselves and their parenting, if they begin or continue medication treatment for OUD. CONCLUSIONS: Substance use treatment providers should consider the social consequences of medication treatment, as well as the clinical benefits, when presenting treatment options and recommendations to patients. Patient-centered care must include an understanding of larger social and structural contexts.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
5
"I've been to more of my friends' funerals than I've been to my friends' weddings": Witnessing and responding to overdose in rural Northern New England
Type: Journal Article
Authors: K. Nolte, E. Romo, T. J. Stopka, A. Drew, P. Dowd, L. Del Toro-Mejias, E. Bianchet, P. D. Friedmann
Year: 2022
Source:
Nolte K, Romo E, Stopka TJ, Drew A, Dowd P, Del Toro-Mejias L, et al. "I've been to more of my friends' funerals than I've been to my friends' weddings": Witnessing and responding to overdose in rural Northern New England. The Journal Of Rural Health : Official Journal Of The American Rural Health Association And The National Rural Health Care Association 2022. https://doi.org/10.1111/jrh.12660.
Publication Place: England
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
6
"If you could wave a magic wand": Treatment barriers in the rural midwest
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Angela Clark, Jennifer Lanzillotta-Rangeley, Jack Stem
Year: 2021
Source:
Clark A, Lanzillotta-Rangeley J, Stem J. "If you could wave a magic wand": Treatment barriers in the rural midwest. Substance Abuse: Research And Treatment 2021;15:6+. https://doi.org/10.1177/11782218211053343.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
7
"In their mind, they always felt less than": The role of peers in shifting stigma as a barrier to opioid use disorder treatment retention
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. S. Anvari, M. B. Kleinman, E. C. Massey, V. D. Bradley, J. W. Felton, A. M. Belcher, J. F. Magidson
Year: 2022
Source:
Anvari MS, Kleinman MB, Massey EC, Bradley VD, Felton JW, Belcher AM, et al. "In their mind, they always felt less than": The role of peers in shifting stigma as a barrier to opioid use disorder treatment retention. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment 2022:108721+. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2022.108721.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
8
"Like Yin and Yang": Perceptions of Methamphetamine Benefits and Consequences Among People Who Use Opioids in Rural Communities
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Robin Baker, Gillian Leichtling, Christi Hildebran, Cristi Pinela, Elizabeth Needham Waddell, Claire Sidlow, Judith M. Leahy, P. T. Korthuis
Year: 2021
Source:
Baker R, Leichtling G, Hildebran C, Pinela C, Waddell EN, Sidlow C, et al. "Like Yin and Yang": Perceptions of Methamphetamine Benefits and Consequences Among People Who Use Opioids in Rural Communities. Journal Of Addiction Medicine 2021;15:34-39, . https://doi.org/10.1097/ADM.0000000000000669.
Publication Place: Baltimore, Maryland
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
9
"Now We Are Seeing the Tides Wash In": Trauma and the Opioid Epidemic in Rural Appalachian Ohio
Type: Journal Article
Authors: C. A. Schalkoff, E. L. Richard, H. M. Piscalko, A. L. Sibley, D. L. Brook, K. E. Lancaster, W. C. Miller, V. F. Go
Year: 2021
Source:
Schalkoff CA, Richard EL, Piscalko HM, Sibley AL, Brook DL, Lancaster KE, et al. "Now We Are Seeing the Tides Wash In": Trauma and the Opioid Epidemic in Rural Appalachian Ohio. Substance Use & Misuse 2021;56:650-659, . https://doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2021.1887248.
Abstract:

Background: Ohio's opioid epidemic continues to progress, severely affecting its rural Appalachian counties-areas marked by high mortality rates, widespread economic challenges, and a history of extreme opioid overprescribing. Substance use may be particularly prevalent in the region due to interactions between community and interpersonal trauma. Purpose/Objectives: We conducted qualitative interviews to explore the local context of the epidemic and the contributing role of trauma. Methods: Two interviewers conducted in-depth interviews (n = 34) with stakeholders in three rural Appalachian counties, including healthcare and substance use treatment professionals, law enforcement officials, and judicial officials. Semi-structured interview guides focused on the social, economic, and historical context of the opioid epidemic, perceived causes and effects of the epidemic, and ideas for addressing the challenge. Results: Stakeholders revealed three pervasive forms of trauma related to the epidemic in their communities: environmental/community trauma (including economic and historical distress), physical/sexual trauma, and emotional trauma. Traumas interact with one another and with substance use in a self-perpetuating cycle. Although stakeholders in all groups discussed trauma from all three categories, their interpretation and proposed solutions differed, leading to a fragmented epidemic response. Participants also discussed the potential of finding hope and community through efforts to address trauma and substance use. Conclusions: Findings lend support to the cyclical relationship between trauma and substance use, as well as the importance of environmental and community trauma as drivers of the opioid epidemic. Community-level and trauma-informed interventions are needed to increase stakeholder consensus around treatment and prevention strategies, as well as to strengthen community organization networks and support community resilience. Supplemental data for this article is available online at https://doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2021.1887248.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
10
"One size does not fit all" and other lessons learned from grants for implementation of the AHRQ medication assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in rural primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: P. Nourjah, E. Kato
Year: 2021
Source:
Nourjah P, Kato E. "One size does not fit all" and other lessons learned from grants for implementation of the AHRQ medication assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in rural primary care. Substance Abuse 2021:1-4, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2021.1891600.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

Purpose: This article summarizes lessons learned from five AHRQ grants to implement Medication for Opioid Use Disorder (MOUD) in rural primary care practices. Methods: Lessons learned were extracted from quarterly and annual grantee progress reports, minutes from quarterly virtual meetings, and minutes and notes from annual grantee in-person meetings. The lessons learned were drafted by the authors and reviewed by the grantees for accuracy. Results: The experience of these projects suggest that recruiting providers in rural areas and engaging them to initiate and sustain provision of MOUD is very difficult. Innovative approaches and providing supports are required for supporting providers to overcome barriers. Implications: Implementation of MOUD in rural primary care is challenging but success is more likely if implementers are attentive to the needs of individual providers, are flexible and tailor implementation to the local situation, and provide on-going support.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
11
"Sick and tired of being sick and tired": Exploring initiation of medications for opioid use disorder among people experiencing homelessness
Type: Journal Article
Authors: N. Swartz, T. Adnan, F. Peréa, T. P. Baggett, A. Chatterjee
Year: 2022
Source:
Swartz N, Adnan T, Peréa F, Baggett TP, Chatterjee A. "Sick and tired of being sick and tired": Exploring initiation of medications for opioid use disorder among people experiencing homelessness. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment 2022:108752+. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2022.108752.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
12
"Study protocol for a randomized control trial to investigate the effectiveness of an 8-week mindfulness-integrated cognitive behavior therapy (MiCBT) transdiagnostic group intervention for primary care patients": Correction
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Sarah Francis, Frances Shawyer, Bruno Cayoun, Joanne Enticott, Graham Meadows
Year: 2020
Source:
Francis S, Shawyer F, Cayoun B, Enticott J, Meadows G. "Study protocol for a randomized control trial to investigate the effectiveness of an 8-week mindfulness-integrated cognitive behavior therapy (MiCBT) transdiagnostic group intervention for primary care patients": Correction. Bmc Psychiatry 2020;20:1+. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-019-2411-1.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
13
"The post-COVID era": challenges in the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD) after the pandemic
Type: Journal Article
Authors: H. López-Pelayo, H. J. Aubin, C. Drummond, G. Dom, F. Pascual, J. Rehm, R. Saitz, E. Scafato, A. Gual
Year: 2020
Source:
López-Pelayo H, Aubin HJ, Drummond C, Dom G, Pascual F, Rehm J, et al. "The post-COVID era": challenges in the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD) after the pandemic. Bmc Medicine 2020;18. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-020-01693-9.
Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Citizens affected by substance use disorders are high-risk populations for both SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19-related mortality. Relevant vulnerabilities to COVID-19 in people who suffer substance use disorders are described in previous communications. The COVID-19 pandemic offers a unique opportunity to reshape and update addiction treatment networks. MAIN BODY: Renewed treatment systems should be based on these seven pillars: (1) telemedicine and digital solutions, (2) hospitalization at home, (3) consultation-liaison psychiatric and addiction services, (4) harm-reduction facilities, (5) person-centered care, (6) promote paid work to improve quality of life in people with substance use disorders, and (7) integrated addiction care. The three "best buys" of the World Health Organization (reduce availability, increase prices, and a ban on advertising) are still valid. Additionally, new strategies must be implemented to systematically deal with (a) fake news concerning legal and illegal drugs and (b) controversial scientific information. CONCLUSION: The heroin pandemic four decades ago was the last time that addiction treatment systems were updated in many western countries. A revised and modernized addiction treatment network must include improved access to care, facilitated where appropriate by technology; more integrated care with addiction specialists supporting non-specialists; and reducing the stigma experienced by people with SUDs.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
14
"We need to build a better bridge": findings from a multi-site qualitative analysis of opportunities for improving opioid treatment services for youth
Type: Journal Article
Authors: K. Marchand, O. Fogarty, K. M. Pellatt, K. Vig, J. Melnychuk, C. Katan, F. Khan, R. Turuba, L. Kongnetiman, C. Tallon, J. Fairbank, S. Mathias, S. Barbic
Year: 2022
Source:
Marchand K, Fogarty O, Pellatt KM, Vig K, Melnychuk J, Katan C, et al. "We need to build a better bridge": findings from a multi-site qualitative analysis of opportunities for improving opioid treatment services for youth. Harm Reduction Journal 2022;19:37+. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12954-022-00623-7.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
15
"What else can we do?"-Provider perspectives on treatment-resistant depression in late life
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. E. Hamm, J. F. Karp, E. Lenard, A. Dawdani, H. Lavretsky, E. J. Lenze, B. H. Mulsant, C. F. Reynolds, S. P. Roose, P. J. Brown
Year: 2022
Source:
Hamm ME, Karp JF, Lenard E, Dawdani A, Lavretsky H, Lenze EJ, et al. "What else can we do?"-Provider perspectives on treatment-resistant depression in late life. Journal Of The American Geriatrics Society 2022;70:1190-1197+. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.17592.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
16
"You are not clean until you're not on anything": Perceptions of medication-assisted treatment in rural Appalachia
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Emma L. Richard, Christine A. Schalkoff, Hannah M. Piscalko, Daniel L. Brook, Adams L. Sibley, Kathryn E. Lancaster, William C. Miller, Vivian F. Go
Year: 2020
Source:
Richard EL, Schalkoff CA, Piscalko HM, Brook DL, Sibley AL, Lancaster KE, et al. "You are not clean until you're not on anything": Perceptions of medication-assisted treatment in rural Appalachia. The International Journal On Drug Policy 2020;85:1+. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2020.102704.
Publication Place: Amsterdam
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
17
'Communities are attempting to tackle the crisis': a scoping review on community plans to prevent and reduce opioid-related harms
Type: Journal Article
Authors: P. Leece, T. Khorasheh, N. Paul, S. Keller-Olaman, S. Massarella, J. Caldwell, M. Parkinson, C. Strike, S. Taha, G. Penney, R. Henderson, H. Manson
Year: 2019
Source:
Leece P, Khorasheh T, Paul N, Keller-Olaman S, Massarella S, Caldwell J, et al. 'Communities are attempting to tackle the crisis': a scoping review on community plans to prevent and reduce opioid-related harms. Bmj Open 2019;9:2018-028583, e028583+. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-028583.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
18
'Integrating Kuwait's Mental Health System to end stigma: a call to action'
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Hind Almazeedi, Mohammad T. Alsuwaidan
Year: 2014
Source:
Almazeedi H, Alsuwaidan MT. 'Integrating Kuwait's Mental Health System to end stigma: a call to action'. Journal Of Mental Health 2014;23:1-3, .
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
19
1.1 Brief Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Anxiety and Depression in Primary Care: A Follow-up
Type: Journal Article
Authors: David A. Brent
Year: 2021
Source:
Brent DA. 1.1 Brief Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Anxiety and Depression in Primary Care: A Follow-up. Journal Of The American Academy Of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 2021;60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2021.09.004.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
20
20.3 REMOTE COACHING AND TECHNOLOGY FOR TRAINING COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKERS TO TREAT DEPRESSION IN PRIMARY CARE: CASE EXAMPLE FROM INDIA AND OPPORTUNITIES TO SCALE UP MENTAL HEALTH CARE GLOBALLY
Type: Journal Article
Authors: John A. Naslund, Deepak Tugnawat, Aditya Anand, Udita Joshi, Azaz Khan, Shital Muke, Juliana L. Restivo, Ritu Shrivastava, Abhishek Singh, Anant Bhan, Vikram Patel
Year: 2021
Source:
Naslund JA, Tugnawat D, Anand A, Joshi U, Khan A, Muke S, et al. 20.3 REMOTE COACHING AND TECHNOLOGY FOR TRAINING COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKERS TO TREAT DEPRESSION IN PRIMARY CARE: CASE EXAMPLE FROM INDIA AND OPPORTUNITIES TO SCALE UP MENTAL HEALTH CARE GLOBALLY. Journal Of The American Academy Of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 2021;60:S288-S289, . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2021.07.669.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection