Literature Collection

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References

5K+

Articles

990+

Grey Literature

1800+

Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 6,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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1261 Results
1
'Integrating Kuwait's Mental Health System to end stigma: a call to action'
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Hind Almazeedi, Mohammad T. Alsuwaidan
Year: 2014
Source:
Almazeedi H, Alsuwaidan MT. 'Integrating Kuwait's Mental Health System to end stigma: a call to action'. Journal Of Mental Health 2014;23:1-3, .
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
2
2014 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report
Type: Government Report
Authors: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Year: 2015
Source:
Quality A for HR and. 2014 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report 2015;AHRQ Pub. No. 15-0007.
Publication Place: Rockville, MD
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

3
2016 Broadband Progress Report
Type: Government Report
Authors: Federal Communications Commission
Year: 2016
Source:
Commission FC. 2016 Broadband Progress Report 2016.
Publication Place: Washington, DC
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

4
2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Detailed Tables
Type: Government Report
Authors: Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality
Year: 2017
Source:
Quality C for BHS and. 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Detailed Tables 2017.
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

5
2016 Systems of Care Special Program: Meeting the Needs of Children and Youth with Complex Behavioral Health Problems in an Integrated Healthcare World
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Justine Larson, Mark Chenven, Gregory K. Fritz, Paige Pierce, Gary Blau, Ruth Stein, Robert J. Hill, Lisa R. Fortuna, Joyce N. Harrison, Kaye L. McGinty, Lisa Amaya-Jackson, Richard Martini, Terry G. Lee, William Arroyo, Sheryl H. Kataoka
Year: 2016
Source:
Larson J, Chenven M, Fritz GK, Pierce P, Blau G, Stein R, et al. 2016 Systems of Care Special Program: Meeting the Needs of Children and Youth with Complex Behavioral Health Problems in an Integrated Healthcare World. Journal Of The American Academy Of Child And Adolescent Psychiatry 2016;55.
Publication Place: Baltimore
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
6
2017 NSDUH Annual National Report
Type: Government Report
Authors: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Year: 2018
Source:
Administration SA and MHS. 2017 NSDUH Annual National Report 2018.
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

7
A Change in Perspective: From Dual Diagnosis to Multimorbidity
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Ish P. Bhalla, Robert A. Rosenheck
Year: 2017
Source:
Bhalla IP, Rosenheck RA. A Change in Perspective: From Dual Diagnosis to Multimorbidity. Psychiatric Services 2017. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201700194.
Abstract: Objective: There has been increasing interest within psychiatry in the concept of multimorbidity because psychiatric patients typically present with multiple concurrent disorders, these disorders mutually exacerbate one another, and their interaction shapes treatment options. Metrics have not been developed to document multimorbidity in psychiatric clinical practice. Methods: Four classes of indicators relevant to multimorbidity were defined and evaluated among veterans treated in mental health specialty clinics nationally in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in fiscal year 2012. Results: Of the 843,583 veterans with at least three visits to a specialty mental health clinic, 94.6% had more than one general medical or mental disorder and 77.6% had more than one mental disorder, compared with 30.6% with co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders. Conclusions: Real-world psychiatric care is more accurately approached from the multimorbidity perspective than from the perspective of principal, dual, or comorbid diagnoses.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
8
A chronic opioid therapy dose reduction policy in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. B. Weimer, D. M. Hartung, S. Ahmed, C. Nicolaidis
Year: 2016
Source:
Weimer MB, Hartung DM, Ahmed S, Nicolaidis C. A chronic opioid therapy dose reduction policy in primary care. Substance Abuse 2016;37:141-147, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2015.1129526.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: High-dose opioids prescribed for the treatment of chronic pain have been associated with increased risk of opioid overdose. Health systems and states have responded by developing opioid dose limitation policies. Little is known about how these policies affect prescribing practices or characteristics of patients who respond best to opioid tapers from high-dose opioids. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate change in total opioid dose after the implementation of a provider education intervention and a 120 mg morphine equivalents per day (MED) opioid dose limitation policy in one academic primary care clinic. We compared opioid prescriptions 1 year before and 1 year after the intervention. We used univariate and multivariate logistic regression to assess which patient characteristics predicted opioid dose reduction from high opioid dose. RESULTS: Out of a total of 516 patients prescribed chronic opioid therapy, 116 patients (22%) were prescribed high-dose opioid therapy (>120 mg MED). After policy adoption, the average daily dose of opioids declined by 64 mg MED (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-96; P < .001) and 41 patients (37%) on high-dose opioids tapered their doses below 120 mg MED (Tapered to Safer Dose group). In multivariate analyses, female sex was the only significant association with dose taper; female patients were less likely to taper to a safer dose (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.28, 95% CI: 0.11-0.70). CONCLUSIONS: A combined intervention of education and a practice policy that limits opioid doses for patients prescribed chronic opioid therapy may be an important component of system-level strategies to reduce opioid misuse and overdose; it may also help identify patients suitable for medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder. Specific strategies may be needed to assist women with opioid dose tapers.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
9
A Clinical Care Algorithmic Toolkit for Promoting Screening and Next-Level Assessment of Pediatric Depression and Anxiety in Primary Care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. Honigfeld, S. J. Macary, D. J. Grasso
Year: 2017
Source:
Honigfeld L, Macary SJ, Grasso DJ. A Clinical Care Algorithmic Toolkit for Promoting Screening and Next-Level Assessment of Pediatric Depression and Anxiety in Primary Care. Journal Of Pediatric Health Care : Official Publication Of National Association Of Pediatric Nurse Associates & Practitioners 2017;31:e15-e23, .
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
10
A Clinical Care Monitoring and Data Collection Tool (H3 Tracker) to Assess Uptake and Engagement in Mental Health Care Services in a Community-Based Pediatric Integrated Care Model: Longitudinal Cohort Study
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. McCreary, A. C. Arevian, M. Brady, A. E. Mosqueda Chichits, L. Zhang, L. Tang, B. Zima
Year: 2019
Source:
McCreary M, Arevian AC, Brady M, Chichits AEM, Zhang L, Tang L, et al. A Clinical Care Monitoring and Data Collection Tool (H3 Tracker) to Assess Uptake and Engagement in Mental Health Care Services in a Community-Based Pediatric Integrated Care Model: Longitudinal Cohort Study. Jmir Mental Health 2019;6. https://doi.org/10.2196/12358.
Publication Place: Canada
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
11
A clinical trial of peer-based culturally responsive person-centered care for psychosis for African Americans and Latinos
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. Tondora, M. O'Connell, R. Miller, T. Dinzeo, C. Bellamy, R. Andres-Hyman, L. Davidson
Year: 2010
Source:
Tondora J, O'Connell M, Miller R, Dinzeo T, Bellamy C, Andres-Hyman R, et al. A clinical trial of peer-based culturally responsive person-centered care for psychosis for African Americans and Latinos. Clinical Trials (London, England) 2010;7:368-379, . https://doi.org/10.1177/1740774510369847.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Providing culturally competent and person-centered care is at the forefront of changing practices in behavioral health. Significant health disparities remain between people of color and whites in terms of care received in the mental health system. Peer services, or support provided by others who have experience in the behavioral health system, is a promising new avenue for helping those with behavioral health concerns move forward in their lives. PURPOSE: We describe a model of peer-based culturally competent person-centered care and treatment planning, informed by longstanding research on recovery from serious mental illness used in a randomized clinical trial conducted at two community mental health centers. METHODS: Participants all were Latino or African American with a current or past diagnosis within the psychotic disorders spectrum as this population is often underserved with limited access to culturally responsive, person-centered services. Study interventions were carried out in both an English-speaking and a Spanish-speaking outpatient program at each study center. Interventions included connecting individuals to their communities of choice and providing assistance in preparing for treatment planning meetings, all delivered by peer-service providers. Three points of evaluation, at baseline, 6 and 18 months, explored the impact of the interventions on areas such as community engagement, satisfaction with treatment, symptom distress, ethnic identity, personal empowerment, and quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Lessons learned from implementation include making cultural modifications, the need for a longer engagement period with participants, and the tension between maintaining strict interventions while addressing the individual needs of participants in line with person-centered principles. The study is one of the first to rigorously test peer-supported interventions in implementing person-centered care within the context of public mental health systems.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
12
A clustered controlled trial of the implementation and effectiveness of a medical home to improve health care of people with serious mental illness: study protocol
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. S. Young, A. N. Cohen, E. T. Chang, A. W. P. Flynn, A. B. Hamilton, R. Oberman, M. Vinzon
Year: 2018
Source:
Young AS, Cohen AN, Chang ET, Flynn AWP, Hamilton AB, Oberman R, et al. A clustered controlled trial of the implementation and effectiveness of a medical home to improve health care of people with serious mental illness: study protocol. Bmc Health Services Research 2018;18:428+. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-3237-0.
Publication Place: England
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
13
A collaborative approach to the treatment of pregnant women with opioid use disorders
Type: Government Report
Authors: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Year: 2016
Source:
Administration SA and MHS. A collaborative approach to the treatment of pregnant women with opioid use disorders 2016;(SMA) 16-4978.
Publication Place: Rockville, MD
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

14
A collaborative care approach to depression treatment for Asian Americans
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. D. Ratzliff, K. Ni, Y. F. Chan, M. Park, J. Unutzer
Year: 2013
Source:
Ratzliff AD, Ni K, Chan YF, Park M, Unutzer J. A collaborative care approach to depression treatment for Asian Americans. Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.c.) 2013;64:487-490, . https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.001742012.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE This study examined effectiveness of collaborative care for depression among Asians treated either at a community health center that focuses on Asians (culturally sensitive clinic) or at general community health centers and among a matched population of whites treated at the same general community clinics. METHODS For 345 participants in a statewide collaborative care program, use of psychotropic medications, primary care visits with depression care managers, and depression severity (as measured with the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire) were tracked at baseline and 16 weeks. RESULTS After adjustment for differences in baseline demographic characteristics, all three groups had similar treatment process and depression outcomes. Asian patients served at the culturally sensitive clinic (N=129) were less likely than Asians (N=72) and whites (N=144) treated in general community health clinics to be prescribed psychotropic medications. CONCLUSIONS Collaborative care for depression showed similar response rates among all three groups.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
15
A Collaborative Care Model to Improve Access to Pediatric Mental Health Services
Type: Journal Article
Authors: O. Aupont, L. Doerfler, D. F. Connor, C. Stille, M. Tisminetzky, T. J. McLaughlin
Year: 2012
Source:
Aupont O, Doerfler L, Connor DF, Stille C, Tisminetzky M, McLaughlin TJ. A Collaborative Care Model to Improve Access to Pediatric Mental Health Services. Administration And Policy In Mental Health And Mental Health Services Research 2012;40:264-273, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10488-012-0413-0.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
16
A collaborative care team to integrate behavioral health care and treatment of poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes in an urban safety net primary care clinic
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. A. Chwastiak, S. L. Jackson, J. Russo, P. DeKeyser, M. Kiefer, B. Belyeu, K. Mertens, L. Chew, E. Lin
Year: 2017
Source:
Chwastiak LA, Jackson SL, Russo J, DeKeyser P, Kiefer M, Belyeu B, et al. A collaborative care team to integrate behavioral health care and treatment of poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes in an urban safety net primary care clinic. General Hospital Psychiatry 2017;44:10-15, .
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
17
A comparison of methods for capturing patient preferences for delivery of mental health services to low-income Hispanics engaged in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Patricia M. Herman, Maia Ingram, Charles E. Cunningham, Heather Rimas, Lucy Murrieta, Kenneth Schachter, Jill Guernsey de Zapien, Scott C. Carvajal
Year: 2016
Source:
Herman PM, Ingram M, Cunningham CE, Rimas H, Murrieta L, Schachter K, et al. A comparison of methods for capturing patient preferences for delivery of mental health services to low-income Hispanics engaged in primary care. The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research 2016;9:293-301, .
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
18
A comparison of Tier 1 and Tier 3 medical homes under Oklahoma Medicaid program
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. I. Kumar, M. Anthony, S. A. Crawford, R. A. Arky, A. Bitton, G. L. Splinter
Year: 2014
Source:
Kumar JI, Anthony M, Crawford SA, Arky RA, Bitton A, Splinter GL. A comparison of Tier 1 and Tier 3 medical homes under Oklahoma Medicaid program. The Journal Of The Oklahoma State Medical Association 2014;107:157-161, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a team-based model of care that seeks to improve quality of care and control costs. The Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) directs Oklahoma's Medicaid program and contracts with 861 medical home practices across the state in one of three tiers of operational capacity: Tier 1 (Basic), Tier 2 (Advanced) and Tier 3 (Optimal). Only 13.5% (n = 116) homes are at the optimal level; the majority (59%, n = 508) at the basic level. In this study, we sought to determine the barriers that prevented Tier 1 homes from advancing to Tier 3 level and the incentives that would motivate providers to advance from Tier 1 to 3. Our hypotheses were that Tier 1 medical homes were located in smaller practices with limited resources and the providers are not convinced that the expense of advancing from Tier 1 status to Tier 3 status was worth the added value. METHODS: We analyzed OHCA records to compare the 508 Tier 1 (entry-level) with 116 Tier 3 (optimal) medical homes for demographic differences with regards to location: urban or rural, duration as medical home, percentage of contracts that were group contracts, number of providers per group contract, panel age range, panel size, and member-provider ratio. We surveyed all 508 Tier 1 homes with a mail-in survey, and with focused follow up visits to identify the barriers to, and incentives for, upgrading from Tier 1 to Tier 2 or 3. RESULTS: We found that Tier 1 homes were more likely to be in rural areas, run by solo practitioners, serve exclusively adult panels, have smaller panel sizes, and have higher member-to-provider ratios in comparison with Tier 3 homes. Our survey had a 35% response rate. Results showed that the most difficult changes for Tier 1 homes to implement were providing 4 hours of after-hours care and a dedicated program for mental illness and substance abuse. The results also showed that the most compelling incentives for encouraging Tier 1 homes to upgrade their tier status were less"red tape"with prior authorizations, higher pay, and help with panel member follow-up. DISCUSSION: Multiple interventions may help medical homes in Oklahoma advance from the basic to the optimal level such as sharing of resources among nearby practices, expansion of OHCA online resources to help with preauthorizations and patient follow up, and the generation and transmission of data on the benefits of medical homes.
Topic(s):
Medical Home See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
19
A comparison of two screening instruments in detecting psychiatric morbidity in a Nigerian pediatric primary care service: assessing clinical suitability and applicability
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. F. Tunde-Ayinmode, B. A. Ayinmode, O. A. Adegunloye, O. A. Abiodun
Year: 2012
Source:
Tunde-Ayinmode MF, Ayinmode BA, Adegunloye OA, Abiodun OA. A comparison of two screening instruments in detecting psychiatric morbidity in a Nigerian pediatric primary care service: assessing clinical suitability and applicability. Annals Of African Medicine 2012;11:203-211, . https://doi.org/10.4103/1596-3519.102849.
Publication Place: India
Abstract: BACKGROUND: To improve poor attendance and underutilization of the child and adolescent psychiatric service in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria, we compared a child behavior questionnaire (CBQ) with reporting questionnaire for children (RQC) for use in our primary care unit where the bulk of referrals come from to determine which is more applicable. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional two-stage study on the prevalence and pattern of psychiatric disorders in children attending the primary care unit of University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, over a 6-month period. CBQ and RQC were completed by the mothers of 350 children aged 7-14 years in the first stage; in the second, a stratified subsample of 157 children based on scores on CBQ were interviewed using the children's version of the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia (Kiddie-SADS-PL). The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was carried out to determine the screening properties of CBQ and RQC. RESULTS: The optimal cutoff score for CBQ and RQC were 7 and 1, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and misclassification rates at the cutoff for CBQ was 0.8 (80%); 0 96 (96%); 0.083 (8.3%), and RQC was 0.90 (90%); 0.78 (78%); 0.19 (19%). The discriminating ability of CBQ indicated by the area under the curve (AUC) in the ROC was 0.93 while RQC was 0.88. CONCLUSION: Even with the evident marginal superior discriminating ability of CBQ in our study in primary care, RQC has the advantage of brevity and ease of application for workers at this level. In the child and adolescent clinic CBQ may still be preferred.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
20
A controlled trial of inpatient and outpatient geriatric evaluation and management
Type: Journal Article
Authors: H. J. Cohen, J. R. Feussner, M. Weinberger, M. Carnes, R. C. Hamdy, F. Hsieh, C. Phibbs, P. Lavori
Year: 2002
Source:
Cohen HJ, Feussner JR, Weinberger M, Carnes M, Hamdy RC, Hsieh F, et al. A controlled trial of inpatient and outpatient geriatric evaluation and management. New England Journal Of Medicine 2002;346:905-912, .
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection