Literature Collection

Collection Insights

7K+

References

6K+

Articles

1000+

Grey Literature

2400+

Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 7,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

Year
Sort by
Order
Show
2545 Results
1
"Feeling confident and equipped": Evaluating the acceptability and efficacy of an overdose response and naloxone administration intervention to service industry employees in New York City
Type: Journal Article
Authors: B. Wolfson-Stofko, M. V. Gwadz, L. Elliott, A. S. Bennett, R. Curtis
Year: 2018
Source:
Wolfson-Stofko B, Gwadz MV, Elliott L, Bennett AS, Curtis R. "Feeling confident and equipped": Evaluating the acceptability and efficacy of an overdose response and naloxone administration intervention to service industry employees in New York City. Drug And Alcohol Dependence 2018;192.
Publication Place: Ireland
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
2
"Hub and Spoke:" Vermont's Framework for Medication Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction
Type: Web Resource
Authors: Beth Tanzman, Anthony Folland
Year: 2016
Source:
Tanzman B, Folland A. "Hub and Spoke:" Vermont's Framework for Medication Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction 2016.
Abstract: Webinar - Faced with increasing rates of opioid addiction and insufficient treatment capacity to meet demand for care, Vermont developed a novel framework to expand medication assisted treatment in both Opioid Treatment Programs (OTPs) and Office-Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) settings. Although this initiative initially focuses on medication assisted treatment for individuals with opioid use disorders, it creates a framework for integrating treatment services for other substance abuse issues and co-occurring mental health disorders into the medical home through a managed approach to care. In addition, this treatment approach will help reduce recidivism in corrections and enhance outcomes for families where addiction is an identified problem for child welfare. Note: Viewing of the webinar requires free registration.
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

3
"I didn't want to be on Suboxone at first…" - Ambivalence in Perinatal Substance Use Treatment
Type: Journal Article
Authors: B. Ostrach, C. Leiner
Year: 2019
Source:
Ostrach B, Leiner C. "I didn't want to be on Suboxone at first…" - Ambivalence in Perinatal Substance Use Treatment. Journal Of Addiction Medicine 2019;13:264-271, . https://doi.org/10.1097/ADM.0000000000000491.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this article are to present findings from recent qualitative research with patients in a combined perinatal substance use treatment program in Central Appalachia, and to describe and analyze participants' ambivalence about medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD), in the context of widespread societal stigma and judgement. METHODS: We conducted research in a comprehensive outpatient perinatal substance use treatment program housed in a larger obstetric practice serving a large rural, Central Appalachian region. The program serves patients across the spectrum of substance use disorders but specifically offers medication-assisted treatment to perinatal patients with OUD. We purposively and opportunistically sampled patients receiving prescriptions for buprenorphine or buprenorphine-naloxone dual product, along with prenatal care and other services. Through participant-observation and semi-structured interviews, we gathered qualitative data from 27 participants, in a total of 31 interviews. We analyzed transcripts of interviews and fieldnotes using modified Grounded Theory. RESULTS: Participants in a combined perinatal substance use treatment program value supportive, non-judgmental care but report ambivalence about medication, within structural and institutional contexts of criminalized, stigmatized substance use and close scrutiny of their pregnancies. Women are keenly aware of the social and public consequences for themselves and their parenting, if they begin or continue medication treatment for OUD. CONCLUSIONS: Substance use treatment providers should consider the social consequences of medication treatment, as well as the clinical benefits, when presenting treatment options and recommendations to patients. Patient-centered care must include an understanding of larger social and structural contexts.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
4
"I'm not abusing or anything": Patient-physician communication about opioid treatment in chronic pain
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Marianne S. Matthias, Erin E. Krebs, Linda A. Collins, Alicia A. Bergman, Jessica Coffing, Matthew J. Bair
Year: 2013
Source:
Matthias MS, Krebs EE, Collins LA, Bergman AA, Coffing J, Bair MJ. "I'm not abusing or anything": Patient-physician communication about opioid treatment in chronic pain. Patient Education And Counseling 2013;93.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
5
"It's a place that gives me hope": A qualitative evaluation of a buprenorphine-naloxone group visit program in an urban federally qualified health center
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. Lai, E. Li, A. Silverio, R. Debates, E. L. Kelly, L. C. Weinstein
Year: 2021
Source:
Lai S, Li E, Silverio A, Debates R, Kelly EL, Weinstein LC. "It's a place that gives me hope": A qualitative evaluation of a buprenorphine-naloxone group visit program in an urban federally qualified health center. Substance Abuse 2021:1-12, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2021.1876202.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

Medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) with buprenorphine is effective in treating opioid use disorder yet remains underutilized. Scant research has examined the experience of patients, clinic staff, and providers in a "low-threshold" group-based MOUD program. This study evaluates a "low-threshold" MOUD program at a federally qualified health center (FQHC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania through the perspectives of its key stakeholders. Methods: This qualitative study involved focus groups of patients, providers, and clinic staff. Focus groups were conducted between October 2017 and June 2018. Grounded theory was used for analysis. Results: There were a total of 10 focus groups, including 20 patient participants and 26 staff members. Program participants noted that a strength of the program is its person-centered harm reduction approach, which is reflected in the program's policies and design. Program participants discussed the programmatic design choices that facilitated their participation and engagement in the program: ease of access, integration into primary care, and group-based visit model. Challenges in program implementation included varying acceptance and understanding of harm reduction among staff, the unpredictability of clinic volume and workflow, and the need to balance access to primary care and MOUD. Conclusion: This group-based MOUD program's philosophy of person-centered harm reduction, low-barrier approach, the structure of group-based visits, and integrated care contributes to increased patient access and retention. Understanding the strengths and challenges of the program may be useful for other safety-net clinics considering a MOUD program.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
6
"It's more than Just a Job to Them": A Qualitative Examination of Patient and Provider Perspectives on Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. R. Filteau, F. L. Kim, B. Green
Year: 2021
Source:
Filteau MR, Kim FL, Green B. "It's more than Just a Job to Them": A Qualitative Examination of Patient and Provider Perspectives on Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder. Community Mental Health Journal 2021. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-021-00824-7.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

The expansion of access to medication-assisted treatment by states and the federal government serves as one important tool for tackling the opioid crisis. Achieving this goal requires increasing the number of medical professionals who hold DATA Waiver 2000 waived status, which allows providers to prescribe the medication utilized by treatment programs. Waived providers are scarce throughout rural America, placing a potentially large burden on those who do hold a waiver. This paper uses data gathered through qualitative interviews with healthcare workers and patients at MAT clinics in Montana to understand how the relationship between rural healthcare workers and MAT patients contributes to burnout and potential staff turnover in a rural setting. Patients defined quality care via the patient-staff relationship, including expectations of personal support and viewing staff availability as a requirement for their recovery. Healthcare workers, in contrast, refer to their availability to patients as overwhelming and necessary both during and after business hours. These findings illuminate the need to continue expanding MAT access in rural communities, especially in non-specialty care settings including primary care offices and Federally Qualified Health Centers.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
7
"It's that longitudinal relationship that pays off": A qualitative study of internal medicine residents' perspectives on learning to prescribe buprenorphine
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. A. Logan, H. E. Jack, J. Darnton, J. W. Klein
Year: 2021
Source:
Logan AA, Jack HE, Darnton J, Klein JW. "It's that longitudinal relationship that pays off": A qualitative study of internal medicine residents' perspectives on learning to prescribe buprenorphine. Substance Abuse 2021:1-12, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2021.1900990.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

The opioid use disorder (OUD) epidemic is a national public health crisis. Access to effective treatment with buprenorphine is limited, in part because few physicians are trained to prescribe it. Little is known about how post-graduate trainees learn to prescribe buprenorphine or how to optimally train them to prescribe. We therefore aimed to explore the experiences and attitudes of residents learning to prescribe buprenorphine within two primary care-based opioid treatment models. Methods: We performed semi-structured interviews with second- and third-year internal medicine residents at an urban academic residency program. Participating residents practiced in clinics providing buprenorphine care using either a nurse care manager model or a provider-centric model. Subjects were sampled purposively to ensure that a diversity of perspectives were included. Interviews were conducted until theoretical saturation was reached and were analyzed using principles of thematic analysis. The research team developed a consensus code list. Each transcript was then independently coded by two researchers. The team then summarized each code and generated a set of themes that captured the main ideas emerging from the data. Results: We completed 14 interviews. Participants reported learning to prescribe buprenorphine through didactics, longitudinal outpatient prescribing, mentorship, and inpatient experiences. We characterized their attitudes toward patients with OUD, medication treatment of OUD, their own role in buprenorphine care, and future prescribing. Participants practicing in both clinical models viewed learning to prescribe buprenorphine as a normal part of their training and demonstrated positive attitudes toward buprenorphine prescribing. Conclusions: Longitudinal outpatient experiences with buprenorphine prescribing can prepare residents to prescribe buprenorphine and stimulate interest in prescribing after residency. Both nurse care manager and provider-centric clinical models can provide meaningful experiences for medical residents. Educators should attend to the volume of patients and inductions managed by each trainee, patient-provider continuity, and supporting trainees in the clinical encounter.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
8
"Like Yin and Yang": Perceptions of Methamphetamine Benefits and Consequences Among People Who Use Opioids in Rural Communities
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Robin Baker, Gillian Leichtling, Christi Hildebran, Cristi Pinela, Elizabeth Needham Waddell, Claire Sidlow, Judith M. Leahy, P. T. Korthuis
Year: 2021
Source:
Baker R, Leichtling G, Hildebran C, Pinela C, Waddell EN, Sidlow C, et al. "Like Yin and Yang": Perceptions of Methamphetamine Benefits and Consequences Among People Who Use Opioids in Rural Communities. Journal Of Addiction Medicine 2021;15:34-39, . https://doi.org/10.1097/ADM.0000000000000669.
Publication Place: Baltimore, Maryland
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
9
"Now We Are Seeing the Tides Wash In": Trauma and the Opioid Epidemic in Rural Appalachian Ohio
Type: Journal Article
Authors: C. A. Schalkoff, E. L. Richard, H. M. Piscalko, A. L. Sibley, D. L. Brook, K. E. Lancaster, W. C. Miller, V. F. Go
Year: 2021
Source:
Schalkoff CA, Richard EL, Piscalko HM, Sibley AL, Brook DL, Lancaster KE, et al. "Now We Are Seeing the Tides Wash In": Trauma and the Opioid Epidemic in Rural Appalachian Ohio. Substance Use & Misuse 2021;56:650-659, . https://doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2021.1887248.
Abstract:

Background: Ohio's opioid epidemic continues to progress, severely affecting its rural Appalachian counties-areas marked by high mortality rates, widespread economic challenges, and a history of extreme opioid overprescribing. Substance use may be particularly prevalent in the region due to interactions between community and interpersonal trauma. Purpose/Objectives: We conducted qualitative interviews to explore the local context of the epidemic and the contributing role of trauma. Methods: Two interviewers conducted in-depth interviews (n = 34) with stakeholders in three rural Appalachian counties, including healthcare and substance use treatment professionals, law enforcement officials, and judicial officials. Semi-structured interview guides focused on the social, economic, and historical context of the opioid epidemic, perceived causes and effects of the epidemic, and ideas for addressing the challenge. Results: Stakeholders revealed three pervasive forms of trauma related to the epidemic in their communities: environmental/community trauma (including economic and historical distress), physical/sexual trauma, and emotional trauma. Traumas interact with one another and with substance use in a self-perpetuating cycle. Although stakeholders in all groups discussed trauma from all three categories, their interpretation and proposed solutions differed, leading to a fragmented epidemic response. Participants also discussed the potential of finding hope and community through efforts to address trauma and substance use. Conclusions: Findings lend support to the cyclical relationship between trauma and substance use, as well as the importance of environmental and community trauma as drivers of the opioid epidemic. Community-level and trauma-informed interventions are needed to increase stakeholder consensus around treatment and prevention strategies, as well as to strengthen community organization networks and support community resilience. Supplemental data for this article is available online at https://doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2021.1887248.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
10
"One size does not fit all" and other lessons learned from grants for implementation of the AHRQ medication assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in rural primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: P. Nourjah, E. Kato
Year: 2021
Source:
Nourjah P, Kato E. "One size does not fit all" and other lessons learned from grants for implementation of the AHRQ medication assisted treatment for opioid use disorder in rural primary care. Substance Abuse 2021:1-4, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2021.1891600.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

Purpose: This article summarizes lessons learned from five AHRQ grants to implement Medication for Opioid Use Disorder (MOUD) in rural primary care practices. Methods: Lessons learned were extracted from quarterly and annual grantee progress reports, minutes from quarterly virtual meetings, and minutes and notes from annual grantee in-person meetings. The lessons learned were drafted by the authors and reviewed by the grantees for accuracy. Results: The experience of these projects suggest that recruiting providers in rural areas and engaging them to initiate and sustain provision of MOUD is very difficult. Innovative approaches and providing supports are required for supporting providers to overcome barriers. Implications: Implementation of MOUD in rural primary care is challenging but success is more likely if implementers are attentive to the needs of individual providers, are flexible and tailor implementation to the local situation, and provide on-going support.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
11
"Painting a picture of the client": implementing the Addiction Severity Index in community treatment programs
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. E. Spear, A. H. Brown, R. A. Rawson
Year: 2005
Source:
Spear SE, Brown AH, Rawson RA. "Painting a picture of the client": implementing the Addiction Severity Index in community treatment programs. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment 2005;29.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: This article discusses the implementation of the Drug Evaluation Network System (DENS) version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) among substance abuse treatment providers in Los Angeles County. Thirty-two trained and certified treatment professionals from 14 programs participated in focus group interviews about their use of and experiences with the ASI. All 14 programs were currently administering the ASI at the time of the study. Qualitative interviews revealed variation among the programs in terms of when staff administered the ASI and how they used it in clinical care. Although the ASI creates a comprehensive picture of substance-abusing patients and their functioning, the timing of its administration seems to significantly affect the usefulness of the information. The findings illustrate the importance of practicality, flexibility, and ongoing training for the successful implementation of evidence-based practices.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
12
"The post-COVID era": challenges in the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD) after the pandemic
Type: Journal Article
Authors: H. López-Pelayo, H. J. Aubin, C. Drummond, G. Dom, F. Pascual, J. Rehm, R. Saitz, E. Scafato, A. Gual
Year: 2020
Source:
López-Pelayo H, Aubin HJ, Drummond C, Dom G, Pascual F, Rehm J, et al. "The post-COVID era": challenges in the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD) after the pandemic. Bmc Medicine 2020;18. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-020-01693-9.
Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Citizens affected by substance use disorders are high-risk populations for both SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19-related mortality. Relevant vulnerabilities to COVID-19 in people who suffer substance use disorders are described in previous communications. The COVID-19 pandemic offers a unique opportunity to reshape and update addiction treatment networks. MAIN BODY: Renewed treatment systems should be based on these seven pillars: (1) telemedicine and digital solutions, (2) hospitalization at home, (3) consultation-liaison psychiatric and addiction services, (4) harm-reduction facilities, (5) person-centered care, (6) promote paid work to improve quality of life in people with substance use disorders, and (7) integrated addiction care. The three "best buys" of the World Health Organization (reduce availability, increase prices, and a ban on advertising) are still valid. Additionally, new strategies must be implemented to systematically deal with (a) fake news concerning legal and illegal drugs and (b) controversial scientific information. CONCLUSION: The heroin pandemic four decades ago was the last time that addiction treatment systems were updated in many western countries. A revised and modernized addiction treatment network must include improved access to care, facilitated where appropriate by technology; more integrated care with addiction specialists supporting non-specialists; and reducing the stigma experienced by people with SUDs.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
13
"We'll be able to take care of ourselves" - A qualitative study of client attitudes toward implementing buprenorphine treatment at syringe services programs
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. Frost, S. Deutsch, S. Brown, E. Lemien, C. O. Cunningham, A. D. Fox
Year: 2021
Source:
Frost T, Deutsch S, Brown S, Lemien E, Cunningham CO, Fox AD. "We'll be able to take care of ourselves" - A qualitative study of client attitudes toward implementing buprenorphine treatment at syringe services programs. Substance Abuse 2021:1-7, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2021.1901173.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

Syringe services programs (SSPs) complement substance use disorder treatment in providing services that improve the health of people who use drugs (PWUD). Buprenorphine treatment is an effective underutilized opioid use disorder treatment. Regulations allow buprenorphine prescribing from office-based settings, potentially including SSPs although few studies have examined this approach. Our objective was to assess the attitudes among PWUD toward the potential introduction of buprenorphine treatment in an SSP. Methods: In this qualitative study, we recruited 34 participants who were enrolled at a New York City-based SSP to participate in one of seven focus group sessions. The focus group facilitators prompted participants to share their thoughts in five domains: attitudes toward (1) medical clinics; (2) harm reduction in general; (3) SSP-based buprenorphine treatment; (4) potential challenges of SSP-based treatment; and (5) logistical considerations of an SSP-based buprenorphine treatment program. Four researchers analyzed focus group transcripts using thematic analysis. Results: Of the 34 participants, most were white (68%), over the age of 40 years old (56%), and had previously tried buprenorphine (89%). Common themes were: 1) The SSP is a supportive community for people who use drugs; 2) Participants felt less stigmatized at the SSP than in general medical settings; 3) Offering buprenorphine treatment could change the SSP's culture; and 4) SSP participants receiving buprenorphine may be tempted to divert their medication. Participants offered suggestions for a slow intentional introduction of buprenorphine treatment at the SSP including structured appointments, training medical providers in harm reduction, and program eligibility criteria. Conclusion: Overall, participants expressed enthusiasm for onsite buprenorphine treatment at SSPs. Research on SSP-based buprenorphine treatment should investigate standard buprenorphine treatment outcomes but also any effects on the program itself and medication diversion. Implementation should consider cultural and environmental aspects of the SSP and consult program staff and participants.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
14
"You are not clean until you're not on anything": Perceptions of medication-assisted treatment in rural Appalachia
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Emma L. Richard, Christine A. Schalkoff, Hannah M. Piscalko, Daniel L. Brook, Adams L. Sibley, Kathryn E. Lancaster, William C. Miller, Vivian F. Go
Year: 2020
Source:
Richard EL, Schalkoff CA, Piscalko HM, Brook DL, Sibley AL, Lancaster KE, et al. "You are not clean until you're not on anything": Perceptions of medication-assisted treatment in rural Appalachia. The International Journal On Drug Policy 2020;85:1+. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2020.102704.
Publication Place: Amsterdam
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
15
$75 annual limit for CM hampers stimulant addiction treatment
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Alison Knopf
Year: 2020
Source:
Knopf A. $75 annual limit for CM hampers stimulant addiction treatment. Brown University Child & Adolescent Psychopharmacology Update 2020;22:1-5, . https://doi.org/10.1002/cpu.30526.
Publication Place: Hoboken, New Jersey
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
16
'Communities are attempting to tackle the crisis': a scoping review on community plans to prevent and reduce opioid-related harms
Type: Journal Article
Authors: P. Leece, T. Khorasheh, N. Paul, S. Keller-Olaman, S. Massarella, J. Caldwell, M. Parkinson, C. Strike, S. Taha, G. Penney, R. Henderson, H. Manson
Year: 2019
Source:
Leece P, Khorasheh T, Paul N, Keller-Olaman S, Massarella S, Caldwell J, et al. 'Communities are attempting to tackle the crisis': a scoping review on community plans to prevent and reduce opioid-related harms. Bmj Open 2019;9:2018-028583, e028583+. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-028583.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
17
'I have it just in case' - Naloxone access and changes in opioid use behaviours
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. C. Heavey, Y. P. Chang, B. M. Vest, R. L. Collins, W. Wieczorek, G. G. Homish
Year: 2018
Source:
Heavey SC, Chang YP, Vest BM, Collins RL, Wieczorek W, Homish GG. 'I have it just in case' - Naloxone access and changes in opioid use behaviours. The International Journal On Drug Policy 2018;51:27-35, . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2017.09.015.
Publication Place: Netherlands
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
18
'Subutex is safe': Perceptions of risk in using illicit drugs during pregnancy
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Anna Leppo
Year: 2012
Source:
Leppo A. 'Subutex is safe': Perceptions of risk in using illicit drugs during pregnancy. International Journal Of Drug Policy 2012;23:365-373, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
19
'This is Not Who I Want to be:' Experiences of Opioid-Dependent Youth Before, and During, Combined Buprenorphine and Behavioral Treatment
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Sarah K. Moore, Honoria Guarino, Lisa A. Marsch
Year: 2014
Source:
Moore SK, Guarino H, Marsch LA. 'This is Not Who I Want to be:' Experiences of Opioid-Dependent Youth Before, and During, Combined Buprenorphine and Behavioral Treatment. Substance Use & Misuse 2014;49:303-314, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
20
2009 Clinical Guidelines from the American Pain Society and the American Academy of Pain Medicine on the use of chronic opioid therapy in chronic noncancer pain: what are the key messages for clinical practice?
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. Chou
Year: 2009
Source:
Chou R. 2009 Clinical Guidelines from the American Pain Society and the American Academy of Pain Medicine on the use of chronic opioid therapy in chronic noncancer pain: what are the key messages for clinical practice?. Polskie Archiwum Medycyny Wewnetrznej 2009;119:469-477, .
Publication Place: Poland
Abstract: Safe and effective chronic opioid therapy (COT) for chronic noncancer pain requires clinical skills and knowledge in both the principles of opioid prescribing and in the assessment and management of risks associated with opioid abuse, addiction, and diversion. The American Pain Society and the American Academy of Pain Medicine commissioned a systematic review of the evidence on COT for chronic noncancer pain and convened a multidisciplinary expert panel to review the evidence and formulate recommendations based on the best available evidence. This article summarizes key clinical messages from this guideline regarding patient selection and risk stratification, informed consent and opioid management plans, initiation and titration of COT, use of methadone, monitoring of patients, use of opioids in high-risk patients, assessment of aberrant drug-related behaviors, dose escalations and high-dose opioid therapy, opioid rotation, indications for discontinuation of therapy, prevention and management of opioid-related adverse effects, driving and work safety, identifying a medical home and when to obtain consultation, and management of breakthrough pain.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection