Literature Collection

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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 6,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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1
A case of pseudosomatization disorder
Type: Web Resource
Authors: S. Epstein, R. M. McCarron
Year: 2006
Source:
Epstein S, McCarron RM. A case of pseudosomatization disorder. Psychiatric Times 2006;23.
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

2
A clinical prediction rule for detecting major depressive disorder in primary care: the PREDICT-NL study
Type: Journal Article
Authors: N. P. Zuithoff, Y. Vergouwe, M. King, I. Nazareth, E. Hak, K. G. Moons, M. I. Geerlings
Year: 2009
Source:
Zuithoff NP, Vergouwe Y, King M, Nazareth I, Hak E, Moons KG, et al. A clinical prediction rule for detecting major depressive disorder in primary care: the PREDICT-NL study. Family Practice 2009;26:241-250, . https://doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmp036.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder often remains unrecognized in primary care. OBJECTIVE: Development of a clinical prediction rule using easily obtainable predictors for major depressive disorder in primary care patients. METHODS: A total of 1046 subjects, aged 18-65 years, were included from seven large general practices in the center of The Netherlands. All subjects were recruited in the general practice waiting room, irrespective of their presenting complaint. Major depressive disorder according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Text Revision edition criteria was assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Candidate predictors were gender, age, educational level, being single, number of presented complaints, presence of non-somatic complaints, whether a diagnosis was assigned, consultation rate in past 12 months, presentation of depressive complaints or prescription of antidepressants in past 12 months, number of life events in past 6 months and any history of depression. RESULTS: The first multivariable logistic regression model including only predictors that require no confronting depression-related questions had a reasonable degree of discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve or concordance-statistic (c-statistic) = 0.71; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.67-0.76). Addition of three simple though more depression-related predictors, number of life events and history of depression, significantly increased the c-statistic to 0.80 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). After transforming this second model to an easily to use risk score, the lowest risk category (sum score or = 30). CONCLUSION: A clinical prediction rule allows GPs to identify patients-irrespective of their complaints-in whom diagnostic workup for major depressive disorder is indicated.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
3
A one-session treatment for patients suffering from medically unexplained symptoms in primary care: a randomized clinical trial
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. Martin, E. Rauh, M. Fichter, W. Rief
Year: 2007
Source:
Martin A, Rauh E, Fichter M, Rief W. A one-session treatment for patients suffering from medically unexplained symptoms in primary care: a randomized clinical trial. Psychosomatics 2007;48:294-303, . https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.psy.48.4.294.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: The aim of the study was to evaluate a one-session cognitive-behavior treatment (CBT) versus standard medical care for 140 primary-care patients with multiple somatoform symptoms. DSM-IV diagnoses were assessed with structured interviews. Primary outcome variables were healthcare utilization, number, and severity of somatoform symptoms, and secondary outcome measures were psychopathology dimensions. Assessments were done at study enrollment, at 4-weeks, and at 6-month follow-up. General acceptance of CBT was high (positive session evaluations, low dropout rate: 15%). Using an intent-to-treat analytic strategy, both groups improved. Yet results showed a stronger reduction in doctor visits and somatization severity in CBT versus standard care.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
4
A primary care perspective on prevailing assumptions about persistent medically unexplained physical symptoms
Type: Journal Article
Authors: I. M. Stanley, S. Peters, P. Salmon
Year: 2002
Source:
Stanley IM, Peters S, Salmon P. A primary care perspective on prevailing assumptions about persistent medically unexplained physical symptoms. International Journal Of Psychiatry In Medicine 2002;32:125-140, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To re-examine the widespread assumption that medically unexplained physical symptoms represent discrete syndromes resulting from somatization of mental illness. METHOD: Primary care patients (N = 223) with medically unexplained symptoms of at least one year's duration were recruited to a study of exercise therapy. Data gathered from patients, from their general practitioners, and from medical records were used to examine relationships between self-defined disability, symptoms, mental state, and use of health care. RESULTS: Levels of disability and health care use were both raised, but were only weakly correlated. While most patients were depressed and/or anxious, a minority (14 percent) were neither. Although mental state correlated with disability, health care use was unrelated to either. Among a wide range of recorded symptoms, few correlations were found to support the existence of discrete syndromes. Analysis of agreement between patients and their doctors in assigning symptoms to broadly defined "syndromes" appears to reflect collaboration that is largely expedient CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of primary care patients with persistent unexplained physical symptoms, we found little evidence of discrete somatic syndromes. The level of health care use is no indication of mental state or level of disability, and the findings are equally consistent with depression or anxiety being secondary to disability and its consequences as with them being primary. The observed collaboration between patients and their doctors carries the risk of shaping, reinforcing, and legitimizing dubious syndromes.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
5
A qualitative comparison of primary care clinicians' and their patients' perspectives on achieving depression care: implications for improving outcomes
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. D. Keeley, D. R. West, B. Tutt, P. A. Nutting
Year: 2014
Source:
Keeley RD, West DR, Tutt B, Nutting PA. A qualitative comparison of primary care clinicians' and their patients' perspectives on achieving depression care: implications for improving outcomes. Bmc Family Practice 2014;15:13+. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-15-13.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Improving the patient experience of primary care is a stated focus of efforts to transform primary care practices into "Patient-centered Medical Homes" (PCMH) in the United States, yet understanding and promoting what defines a positive experience from the patient's perspective has been de-emphasized relative to the development of technological and communication infrastructure at the PCMH. The objective of this qualitative study was to compare primary care clinicians' and their patients' perceptions of the patients' experiences, expectations and preferences as they try to achieve care for depression. METHODS: We interviewed 6 primary care clinicians along with 30 of their patients with a history of depressive disorder attending 4 small to medium-sized primary care practices from rural and urban settings. RESULTS: Three processes on the way to satisfactory depression care emerged: 1. a journey, often from fractured to connected care; 2. a search for a personal understanding of their depression; 3. creation of unique therapeutic spaces for treating current depression and preventing future episodes. Relative to patients' observations regarding stigma's effects on accepting a depression diagnosis and seeking treatment, clinicians tended to underestimate the presence and effects of stigma. Patients preferred clinicians who were empathetic listeners, while clinicians worried that discussing depression could open "Pandora's box" of lengthy discussions and set them irrecoverably behind in their clinic schedules. Clinicians and patients agreed that somatic manifestations of mental distress impeded the patients' ability to understand their suffering as depression. Clinicians reported supporting several treatment modalities beyond guideline-based approaches for depression, yet also displayed surface-level understanding of the often multifaceted support webs their patient described. CONCLUSIONS: Improving processes and outcomes in primary care may demand heightened ability to understand and measure the patients' experiences, expectations and preferences as they receive primary care. Future research would investigate a potential mismatch between clinicians' and patients' perceptions of the effects of stigma on achieving care for depression, and on whether time spent discussing depression during the clinical visit improves outcomes. Improving care and outcomes for chronic disorders such as depression may require primary care clinicians to understand and support their patients' unique 'therapeutic spaces.'
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
6
A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Care Recommendation Letter Intervention for Somatization in Primary Care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Perry Dickinson, Miriam Dickinson, Frank V. deGruy, Deborah S. Main, Lucy M. Candib, Kathryn Rost
Year: 2003
Source:
Dickinson P, Dickinson M, deGruy FV, Main DS, Candib LM, Rost K. A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Care Recommendation Letter Intervention for Somatization in Primary Care. Annals Of Family Medicine 2003;1:228-235, . https://doi.org/10.1370/afm.5.
Publication Place: Inc.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
7
A randomized controlled trial of brief training in the assessment and treatment of somatization in primary care: Effects on patient outcome
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. Rosendal, F. Olesen, P. Fink, T. Toft, I. Sokolowski, F. Bro
Year: 2007
Source:
Rosendal M, Olesen F, Fink P, Toft T, Sokolowski I, Bro F. A randomized controlled trial of brief training in the assessment and treatment of somatization in primary care: Effects on patient outcome. General Hospital Psychiatry 2007;29:364-373, . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2007.03.005.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to evaluate the effect of an educational program designed to improve care for somatizing patients in primary care. METHOD: Evaluation was performed during routine clinical care in a cluster randomized controlled trial. Patients were included consecutively, and those with a high score on rating scales for somatization were selected for follow-up (n=911). Follow-up was conducted 3 months (response rate=0.74) and 12 months (response rate=0.69) after inclusion using questionnaires measuring quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form), disability days (WHO's Disability Assessment Schedule), somatization (Whiteley-7 and Symptom Checklist Somatic Symptom Scale) and patient satisfaction (European Project on Patient Evaluation of General Practice Care). We analyzed differences from baseline to follow-up and compared these for intervention and control groups. RESULTS: Self-reported health improved in both intervention and control groups during follow-up for patients with a high score for somatization, but changes were small. We could not demonstrate any difference between the control group and the intervention group with regard to our primary outcome 'physical functioning.' Patients in the intervention group tended to be more satisfied at 12-month follow-up than those in the control group, but this difference fell short of statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Training of primary care physicians showed no statistically significant effect on clinical outcome and showed nonsignificant improvement in patient satisfaction with care for patients with a high score for somatization.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
8
A short-term intervention in a multidisciplinary referral clinic for primary care frequent attenders: description of the model, patient characteristics and their use of medical resources
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. Matalon, T. Nahmani, S. Rabin, B. Maoz, J. Hart
Year: 2002
Source:
Matalon A, Nahmani T, Rabin S, Maoz B, Hart J. A short-term intervention in a multidisciplinary referral clinic for primary care frequent attenders: description of the model, patient characteristics and their use of medical resources. Family Practice 2002;19:251-256, .
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Frequent attenders in primary care are a professional challenge for family physicians, and the medical costs of their care can be very high. Some of them suffer from somatization and are concerned solely with their physical complaints, although somatic complaints are the most common presentation of anxiety and depression. To assess and treat these patients comprehensively, a multidisciplinary clinic was created in the community. METHODS: This study describes the first 40 patients referred to the clinic. All patients completed a mental health screening questionnaire and a functional assessment of health. The utilization of medical resources was assessed by chart review for the year before and the year after the first encounter in the clinic. The intervention consisted of a comprehensive bio-psychosocial consultation where life history and medical symptoms were woven together into a new narrative. The intervention also included pharmacological treatment and short-term psychological interventions. RESULTS: The majority of referred patients were women and their average age was 52 years. Headache was the leading symptom, followed by fatigue. The mean number of reported symptoms for each individual patient was 10. Mental health problems were mainly somatization, depression and anxiety. The average yearly costs per person of US$4035 were reduced to US$1161 the year following referral. CONCLUSIONS: The integrated approach of the clinic satisfied at least three needs: of the patient, of the referring physician and of the health maintenance organization. The results of this uncontrolled pilot study suggest that this intervention helped to modify illness behaviour, decreasing the costs of medical investigations.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
9
A simple protocol to manage patients with unexplained somatic symptoms in medical practice
Type: Journal Article
Authors: K. S. Jacob
Year: 2004
Source:
Jacob KS. A simple protocol to manage patients with unexplained somatic symptoms in medical practice. The National Medical Journal Of India 2004;17:326-328, .
Publication Place: India
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
10
A spiritual problem? Primary care physicians' and psychiatrists' interpretations of medically unexplained symptoms
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. H. Shin, J. D. Yoon, K. A. Rasinski, H. G. Koenig, K. G. Meador, F. A. Curlin
Year: 2013
Source:
Shin JH, Yoon JD, Rasinski KA, Koenig HG, Meador KG, Curlin FA. A spiritual problem? Primary care physicians' and psychiatrists' interpretations of medically unexplained symptoms. Journal Of General Internal Medicine 2013;28:392-398, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-012-2224-0.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Patients commonly present to their physicians with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS), and there is no consensus about how physicians should interpret or treat such symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To examine how variations in physicians' interpretations of MUS are associated with physicians' religious characteristics and with physician specialty (primary care vs. psychiatry). DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A national survey of a stratified random sample of 1,504 primary care physicians and 512 psychiatrists in 2009-2010. MAIN MEASURES: The extent to which physicians believe MUS reflect a root problem that is spiritual in nature or result from conditions that scientific research will eventually explain, and whether such patients would benefit from attention to their relationships, attention to their spiritual life, taking medications, and/or treatment by physicians. KEY RESULTS: Response rate was 63 % (1,208/1,909). More religious/spiritual physicians were more likely to believe that MUS reflect a spiritual problem (55 % for high vs. 24 % for low spirituality; OR = 2.8, 1.7-4.5) and that these patients would benefit from paying attention to their spiritual life (79 % for high vs. 55 % for low spirituality; OR = 3.1, 1.8-5.3). Psychiatrists were more likely to believe that scientific research will one day explain MUS (66 % vs. 52 %; OR = 1.9, 1.4-2.5) and that these symptoms will improve with treatment by a physician (54 % vs. 35 %; OR = 2.4, 1.8-3.3). They were less likely to believe that MUS reflect a spiritual problem (23 % vs. 38 %; OR = 0.5, 0.4-0.8). CONCLUSIONS: Physicians' interpretations of MUS vary widely, depending in part on physicians' religious characteristics and specialty. One in three physicians believes that patients with MUS have root problems that are spiritual in nature. Physicians who are more religious or spiritual are more likely to think of MUS as stemming from spiritual concerns. Psychiatrists are more optimistic that these patients will get better with treatment by physicians.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
11
A study of somatization among primary care patients in Nigeria
Type: Journal Article
Authors: O. A. Abiodun
Year: 1995
Source:
Abiodun OA. A study of somatization among primary care patients in Nigeria. International Journal Of Mental Health 1995;23:81-89+.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
12
Accounting for the uncounted: Physical and affective distress in individuals dropping out of oral naltrexone treatment for opioid use disorder
Type: Journal Article
Authors: K. M. Carroll, C. Nich, T. L. Frankforter, S. W. Yip, B. D. Kiluk, E. E. DeVito, M. Sofuoglu
Year: 2018
Source:
Carroll KM, Nich C, Frankforter TL, Yip SW, Kiluk BD, DeVito EE, et al. Accounting for the uncounted: Physical and affective distress in individuals dropping out of oral naltrexone treatment for opioid use disorder. Drug And Alcohol Dependence 2018;192:264-270, .
Publication Place: Ireland
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
13
Accuracy of diagnosing depression in primary care: the impact of chronic somatic and psychiatric co-morbidity
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. Nuyen, A. C. Volkers, P. F. Verhaak, F. G. Schellevis, P. P. Groenewegen, G. A. Van den Bos
Year: 2005
Source:
Nuyen J, Volkers AC, Verhaak PF, Schellevis FG, Groenewegen PP, Van den Bos GA. Accuracy of diagnosing depression in primary care: the impact of chronic somatic and psychiatric co-morbidity. Psychological Medicine 2005;35:1185-1195, .
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Depression is highly co-morbid with both psychiatric and chronic somatic disease. These types of co-morbidity have been shown to exert opposite effects on underdiagnosis of depression by general practitioners (GPs). However, past research has not addressed their combined effect on underdiagnosis of depression. METHOD: Co-morbidity data on 191 depressed primary-care patients selected by a two-stage sampling procedure were analysed. Diagnoses of major depression and/or dysthymia in the last 12 months were assessed using a standardized psychiatric interview (CIDI) and compared with depression diagnoses registered by GPs in patient contacts during the same period. Presence of psychiatric and chronic somatic co-morbidity was determined using the CIDI and contact registration, respectively. RESULTS: Regression analysis showed a significant interaction effect between psychiatric and chronic somatic co-morbidity on GPs' diagnosis of depression, while taking into account the effects of sociodemographic variables, depression severity and number of GP contacts. Subsequent stratified analysis revealed that in patients without chronic somatic co-morbidity, a lower educational level, a less severe depression, and fewer GP contacts all significantly increased the likelihood of not being diagnosed as depressed. In contrast, in patients with chronic somatic co-morbidity, only having no psychiatric co-morbidity significantly decreased the likelihood of receiving a depression diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the effects of psychiatric co-morbidity and other factors on underdiagnosis of depression by GPs differ between depressed patients with and without chronic somatic co-morbidity. Efforts to improve depression diagnosis by GPs seem to require different strategies for depressed patients with and without chronic somatic co-morbidity.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
14
Accuracy of referring psychiatric diagnosis on a consultation-liaison service
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. L. Dilts Jr, N. Mann, J. G. Dilts
Year: 2003
Source:
Dilts SL, Mann N, Dilts JG. Accuracy of referring psychiatric diagnosis on a consultation-liaison service. Psychosomatics 2003;44:407-411, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: The authors determined the accuracy of the initial psychiatric diagnosis of primary medical providers requesting psychiatric consultation in a general medical inpatient setting. A retrospective review of 346 consecutive psychiatric consultations was conducted in which the initial diagnostic impression of primary medical providers was compared with the final psychiatric diagnosis. Accuracy rates for cognitive disorders, substance use disorders, and depressive disorders were 100%, 88.9%, and 53.6%, respectively. Thus, initial diagnoses of a cognitive or substance use disorder by primary medical providers are likely to be accurate, whereas an initial diagnosis of a depressive disorder will be inaccurate in approximately half of the cases.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
15
Adult post-traumatic stress disorder: screening and treating in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Linda Nakell
Year: 2007
Source:
Nakell L. Adult post-traumatic stress disorder: screening and treating in primary care. Primary Care: Clinics In Office Practice 2007;34:593-610, . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pop.2007.05.010.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
16
Alcohol use, comorbidities, and receptivity to treatment in Hispanic farmworkers in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: D. J. Cherry, K. Rost
Year: 2009
Source:
Cherry DJ, Rost K. Alcohol use, comorbidities, and receptivity to treatment in Hispanic farmworkers in primary care. Journal Of Health Care For The Poor & Underserved 2009;20:1095-1110, . https://doi.org/10.1353/hpu.0.0215.
Publication Place: URL
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
17
An evidence-based approach to managing suicidal patients in the patient-centered medical home.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Craig J. Bryan, Kent A. Corso, Jennifer Macalanda
Year: 2014
Source:
Bryan CJ, Corso KA, Macalanda J. An evidence-based approach to managing suicidal patients in the patient-centered medical home. Cognitive And Behavioral Practice 2014;21:269-281, .
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
,
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
18
An integrated approach to the formulation and psychotherapy of medically unexplained symptoms: meaning- and attachment-based intervention
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. Maunder, J. Hunter
Year: 2004
Source:
Maunder R, Hunter J. An integrated approach to the formulation and psychotherapy of medically unexplained symptoms: meaning- and attachment-based intervention. American Journal Of Psychotherapy 2004;58:17-33, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Persistent medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are a serious problem because they are common, difficult to treat effectively, and have a significant impact on both functional outcomes and health-care utilization costs. An attachment-existential formulation of psychological factors that are associated with persistent MUS is presented, based on the interaction of death anxiety and preoccupied (anxious) attachment. Psychotherapeutic treatment recommendations that follow from this formulation are described in the form of a brief psychotherapy, involving semi-structured weekly sessions and narrative-writing homework that explores attachment and existential themes. This is the first description of a brief psychotherapy that integrates attachment theory and existential psychology.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
19
An international study comparing the effect of medically explained and unexplained somatic symptoms on psychosocial outcome
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Stephen Kisely, Gregory Simon
Year: 2006
Source:
Kisely S, Simon G. An international study comparing the effect of medically explained and unexplained somatic symptoms on psychosocial outcome. Journal Of Psychosomatic Research 2006;60:125-130, . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2005.06.064.
Publication Place: Netherlands: Elsevier Science
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
20
Approaches to somatoform disorders in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. R. Chamberlain
Year: 2003
Source:
Chamberlain JR. Approaches to somatoform disorders in primary care. Johns Hopkins Advanced Studies In Medicine 2003;3:438-47, 431, 435, .
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection