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The Literature Collection contains over 6,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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1
A Clinical Care Monitoring and Data Collection Tool (H3 Tracker) to Assess Uptake and Engagement in Mental Health Care Services in a Community-Based Pediatric Integrated Care Model: Longitudinal Cohort Study
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. McCreary, A. C. Arevian, M. Brady, A. E. Mosqueda Chichits, L. Zhang, L. Tang, B. Zima
Year: 2019
Source:
McCreary M, Arevian AC, Brady M, Chichits AEM, Zhang L, Tang L, et al. A Clinical Care Monitoring and Data Collection Tool (H3 Tracker) to Assess Uptake and Engagement in Mental Health Care Services in a Community-Based Pediatric Integrated Care Model: Longitudinal Cohort Study. Jmir Mental Health 2019;6. https://doi.org/10.2196/12358.
Publication Place: Canada
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
2
A cognitive behavioral therapy-based text messaging intervention for methamphetamine dependence
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Victoria Keoleian, Alex Stalcup, Douglas L. Polcin, Michelle Brown, Gantt Galloway
Year: 2013
Source:
Keoleian V, Stalcup A, Polcin DL, Brown M, Galloway G. A cognitive behavioral therapy-based text messaging intervention for methamphetamine dependence. Journal Of Psychoactive Drugs 2013;45:434-442, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
3
A cohort study of the long-term impact of a fire disaster on the physical and mental health of adolescents
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. Dorn, J. C. Yzermans, P. M. Spreeuwenberg, A. Schilder, J. van der Zee
Year: 2008
Source:
Dorn T, Yzermans JC, Spreeuwenberg PM, Schilder A, van der Zee J. A cohort study of the long-term impact of a fire disaster on the physical and mental health of adolescents. Journal Of Traumatic Stress 2008;21:239-242, . https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.20328.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: The literature on adult trauma survivors demonstrates that those exposed to traumatic stress have a poorer physical health status than nonexposed individuals. Studies on physical health effects in adolescent trauma survivors, in contrast, are scarce. In the current study, it was hypothesized that adolescents who have been involved in a mass burn incident (N = 124) will demonstrate more physical and mental health problems than an unaffected cohort from the same community (N = 1,487). Health data were extracted from electronic medical records, covering 1-year prefire and 4-years postfire. When compared to the prefire baseline, survivors showed significantly larger increases in mental, respiratory, and musculoskeletal problems than community controls during the first year after the fire, but not during the later years.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
4
A comparison of patient recall of smoking cessation advice with advice recorded in electronic medical records
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. Szatkowski, A. McNeill, S. Lewis, T. Coleman
Year: 2011
Source:
Szatkowski L, McNeill A, Lewis S, Coleman T. A comparison of patient recall of smoking cessation advice with advice recorded in electronic medical records. Bmc Public Health 2011;11:291+. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-11-291.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Brief cessation advice delivered to smokers during routine primary care consultations increases smoking cessation rates. However, in previous studies investigating recall of smoking cessation advice, smokers have reported more advice being received than is actually documented in their medical records. Recording of smoking cessation advice in UK primary care medical records has increased since the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) in 2004, and so we compare recall and recording of cessation advice since this time to assess whether or not agreement between these two data sources has improved. METHODS: For each year from 2000 to 2009, the proportion of patients in The Health Improvement Network Database (THIN) with a recording of cessation advice in their notes in the last 12 months was calculated. In 2004, 2005 and 2008, these figures were compared to rates of patients recalling having received cessation advice in the last 12 months in the Primary Care Trust (PCT) Patient Surveys, with adjustment for age, sex and regional differences between the populations. RESULTS: In 2004 there was good agreement between the proportion of THIN patients who had cessation advice recorded in their medical records and the proportion recalling advice in the Patient Survey. However, in both 2005 and 2008, more patients had cessation advice recorded in their medical records than recalled receiving advice. CONCLUSIONS: Since the introduction of the QOF, the rate of recording of cessation advice in primary care medical records has exceeded that of patient recall. Whilst both data sources have limitations, our study suggests that, in recent years, the proportion of smokers being advised to quit by primary care health professionals may not have improved as much as the improved recording rates imply.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
5
A computer-assisted depression intervention in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: W. Levin, D. R. Campbell, K. B. McGovern, J. M. Gau, D. B. Kosty, J. R. Seeley, P. M. Lewinsohn
Year: 2011
Source:
Levin W, Campbell DR, McGovern KB, Gau JM, Kosty DB, Seeley JR, et al. A computer-assisted depression intervention in primary care. Psychological Medicine 2011;41:1373-1383, . https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291710001935.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: The clinical benefit for depression of an interactive computer-assisted cognitive-behavioral program on CD-ROM, the Wellness Workshop (WW), was evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. METHOD: A total of 191 individuals referred by primary-care physicians were randomly assigned to a control group, where physician-directed treatment as usual (TAU) was provided, or to a treatment group, where TAU was supplemented with the WW CD-ROM, delivered by mail (WW+TAU). Data were collected at baseline, at 6 weeks' post-intervention, and at a 6-month follow-up assessment. Participants were given a strong incentive by a reimbursement of $75 for completion of each assessment. Measures included symptom ratings obtained via structured clinical diagnostic interviews, as well as a battery of self-report questionnaires on symptoms specifically targeted by the intervention. RESULTS: Analysis of results demonstrated evidence for skill acquisition for improving dysfunctional thinking and reducing anxiety. Among those who met diagnostic criteria for depression, WW+TAU participants were three times more likely to remit at 6 weeks' post-test than TAU participants. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence supports the conclusion that the WW intervention added benefit to traditional care for depression. No placebo comparison group was included and the WW+TAU participants received slightly more attention (a supportive telephone contact, </= 5 min from a psychologist 2 weeks after receiving the program). Overall, the findings add support to the accumulating evidence for the potential clinical benefit of computer-assisted behavioral health interventions.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
6
A decade-long path to integration
Type: Journal Article
Authors: D. Grantham
Year: 2011
Source:
Grantham D. A decade-long path to integration. Behavioral Healthcare 2011;31:24-25, .
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
7
A demonstration project for using the electronic health record to identify and treat tobacco users
Type: Journal Article
Authors: C. Lindholm, R. Adsit, P. Bain, P. M. Reber, T. Brein, L. Redmond, S. S. Smith, M. C. Fiore
Year: 2010
Source:
Lindholm C, Adsit R, Bain P, Reber PM, Brein T, Redmond L, et al. A demonstration project for using the electronic health record to identify and treat tobacco users. Wmj : Official Publication Of The State Medical Society Of Wisconsin 2010;109:335-340, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: While the majority of smokers visit a primary care physician each year, only a small proportion of them receive evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment. The electronic health record (EHR) provides an opportunity to prompt clinicians to deliver tobacco dependence treatment in primary care. METHODS: Over 1 year, Dean Health Systems worked with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health to modify the existing Dean EHR system (Epic Systems Corp, Verona, Wisconsin) to improve identification and treatment of adult smokers visiting primary care clinics. Modifications included evidence-based prompts that helped guide medical assistants to identify smokers and clinicians to deliver a brief tobacco cessation intervention (medication and Wisconsin Tobacco Quit Line referral). Eighteen primary care clinics provided data 1 year before and 1 year after implementing the EHR modifications. RESULTS: A higher percentage of adult patients had their tobacco use status identified after EHR modification compared to pre-implementation (71.6% versus 78.4%, P < .001). During the post-implementation year, 6.3% of adult smokers were prescribed tobacco cessation medication, 2.5% of adult smokers had documentation of counseling, and 1.5% of adult smokers had counseling billed (pre-implementation data not available). CONCLUSIONS: This demonstration project showed that a large health care system can increase the delivery of tobacco dependence treatment interventions (increased identification of smokers and relatively high rates of delivering specific tobacco dependence clinical interventions) building on an existing EHR platform. The project demonstrated that brief, evidence-based tobacco dependence interventions can be incorporated into primary care, especially when the EHR is used to improve clinic workflow.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
8
A Framework for Defining Telehealth
Type: Report
Authors: Telehealth Resource Centers
Year: 2021
Source:
Centers TR. A Framework for Defining Telehealth. Center for Connected Health Policy; 2021.
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

9
A method to provide integrated care for complex medically ill patients: the INTERMED
Type: Journal Article
Authors: C. H. Latour, F. J. Huyse, R. de Vos, W. A. Stalman
Year: 2007
Source:
Latour CH, Huyse FJ, de Vos R, Stalman WA. A method to provide integrated care for complex medically ill patients: the INTERMED. Nursing & Health Sciences 2007;9:150-157, . https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-2018.2007.00292.x.
Publication Place: Australia
Abstract: A growing number of nursing subspecializations have been developed in recent decades. Topics of concern are that care is not tailored to cope with the growing number of patients with more than one chronic disease, there is an increase in co-ordination problems in the care that is provided for this group of complex patients, and the care for these complex patients is extremely fragmented. The assessment of health risks resulting in co-ordinated care with effective communication is vital for multimorbid patients. Our aim is to describe a systematic approach (the INTERMED [IM] method) to identify complex patients who are in need of integrated care and its applicability to the nursing process. We demonstrate the ability of the IM method to quantify, weigh, and classify the complexity of problems. The method is applied in Europe and will be started in the USA in a pharmacy program. The IM is presented as a decision-support system for multidisciplinary teams with nurse co-ordinators.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
10
A mixed-methods evaluation of the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a mobile intervention for methadone maintenance clients
Type: Journal Article
Authors: H. Guarino, M. Acosta, L. A. Marsch, H. Xie, Y. Aponte-Melendez
Year: 2016
Source:
Guarino H, Acosta M, Marsch LA, Xie H, Aponte-Melendez Y. A mixed-methods evaluation of the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a mobile intervention for methadone maintenance clients. Psychology Of Addictive Behaviors : Journal Of The Society Of Psychologists In Addictive Behaviors 2016;30:1-11, . https://doi.org/10.1037/adb0000128.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
11
A mobile phone application for the assessment and management of youth mental health problems in primary care: a randomised controlled trial
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. C. Reid, S. D. Kauer, S. J. Hearps, A. H. Crooke, A. S. Khor, L. A. Sanci, G. C. Patton
Year: 2011
Source:
Reid SC, Kauer SD, Hearps SJ, Crooke AH, Khor AS, Sanci LA, et al. A mobile phone application for the assessment and management of youth mental health problems in primary care: a randomised controlled trial. Bmc Family Practice 2011;12:131+. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-12-131.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Over 75% of mental health problems begin in adolescence and primary care has been identified as the target setting for mental health intervention by the World Health Organisation. The mobiletype program is a mental health assessment and management mobile phone application which monitors mood, stress, coping strategies, activities, eating, sleeping, exercise patterns, and alcohol and cannabis use at least daily, and transmits this information to general practitioners (GPs) via a secure website in summary format for medical review. METHODS: We conducted a randomised controlled trial in primary care to examine the mental health benefits of the mobiletype program. Patients aged 14 to 24 years were recruited from rural and metropolitan general practices. GPs identified and referred eligible participants (those with mild or more mental health concerns) who were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (where mood, stress, and daily activities were monitored) or the attention comparison group (where only daily activities were monitored). Both groups self-monitored for 2 to 4 weeks and reviewed the monitoring data with their GP. GPs, participants, and researchers were blind to group allocation at randomisation. Participants completed pre-, post-, and 6-week post-test measures of the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale and an Emotional Self Awareness (ESA) Scale. RESULTS: Of the 163 participants assessed for eligibility, 118 were randomised and 114 participants were included in analyses (intervention group n = 68, comparison group n = 46). Mixed model analyses revealed a significant group by time interaction on ESA with a medium size of effect suggesting that the mobiletype program significantly increases ESA compared to an attention comparison. There was no significant group by time interaction for depression, anxiety, or stress, but a medium to large significant main effect for time for each of these mental health measures. Post-hoc analyses suggested that participation in the RCT lead to enhanced GP mental health care at pre-test and improved mental health outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring mental health symptoms appears to increase ESA and implementing a mental health program in primary care and providing frequent reminders, clinical resources, and support to GPs substantially improved mental health outcomes for the sample as a whole. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00794222.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
12
A mobile phone application for the assessment and management of youth mental health problems in primary care: health service outcomes from a randomised controlled trial of mobiletype
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. C. Reid, S. D. Kauer, S. J. Hearps, A. H. Crooke, A. S. Khor, L. A. Sanci, G. C. Patton
Year: 2013
Source:
Reid SC, Kauer SD, Hearps SJ, Crooke AH, Khor AS, Sanci LA, et al. A mobile phone application for the assessment and management of youth mental health problems in primary care: health service outcomes from a randomised controlled trial of mobiletype. Bmc Family Practice 2013;14:84+. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-14-84.
Abstract: BACKGROUND: GPs detect at best 50c of mental health problems in young people. Barriers to detecting mental health problems include lack of screening tools, limited appointment times and young people's reluctance to report mental health symptoms to GPs. The mobiletype program is a mobile phone mental health assessment and management application which monitors mood, stress and everyday activities then transmits this information to general practitioners (GPs) via a secure website in summary format for medical review. The current aims were to examine: (i) mobiletype as a clinical assistance tool, ii) doctor-patient rapport and, iii) pathways to care. METHODS: We conducted a randomised controlled trial in primary care with patients aged 14 to 24 years recruited from rural and metropolitan general practices. GPs identified and referred eligible participants (those with mild or more mental health concerns) who were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (where mood, stress and daily activities were monitored) or the attention-comparison group (where only daily activities were monitored). Both groups self-monitored for 2 to 4 weeks and reviewed the monitoring data with their GP. GPs, participants and researchers were blind to group allocation at randomisation. GPs assessed the mobiletype program as a clinical assistant tool. Doctor-patient rapport was assessed using the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire Communication and Enablement subscales, and the Trust in Physician Scale (TPS). Pathways to care was measured using The Party Project's Exit Interview. RESULTS: Of the 163 participants assessed for eligibility, 118 were randomised and 114 participants were included in analyses (intervention n = 68, attention-comparison n = 46). T-tests showed that the intervention program increased understanding of patient mental health, assisted in decisions about medication/referral and helped in diagnosis when compared to the attention-comparison program. Mixed model analysis showed no differences in GP-patient rapport nor in pathways to care. CONCLUSIONS: We conducted the first RCT of a mobile phone application in the mental health assessment and management of youth mental health in primary care. This study suggests that mobiletype has much to offer GPs in the often difficult and time-consuming task of assessment and management of youth mental health problems in primary care.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00794222.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
13
A National Action Plan To Support Consumer Engagement Via E-Health
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. Ricciardi, F. Mostashari, J. Murphy, J. G. Daniel, E. P. Siminerio
Year: 2013
Source:
Ricciardi L, Mostashari F, Murphy J, Daniel JG, Siminerio EP. A National Action Plan To Support Consumer Engagement Via E-Health. Health Affairs 2013;32:376-384, . https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1216.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
14
A national study of a telephone support service for patients receiving office-based buprenorphine medication-assisted treatment: study feasibility and sample description
Type: Journal Article
Authors: C. Ruetsch, J. Cacciola, J. Tkacz
Year: 2010
Source:
Ruetsch C, Cacciola J, Tkacz J. A national study of a telephone support service for patients receiving office-based buprenorphine medication-assisted treatment: study feasibility and sample description. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment 2010;39:307-317, .
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
15
A patient centered care plan in the EHR: Improving collaboration and engagement.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Kavitha Chunchu, Larry Mauksch, Carol Charles, Valerie Ross, Judith Pauwels
Year: 2012
Source:
Chunchu K, Mauksch L, Charles C, Ross V, Pauwels J. A patient centered care plan in the EHR: Improving collaboration and engagement. Families, Systems, & Health 2012;30. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0029100.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
16
A pharmacist-led information technology intervention for medication errors (PINCER): A multicentre, cluster randomised, controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Anthony J. Avery, Sarah Rodgers, Judith A. Cantrill, Sarah Armstrong, Kathrin Cresswell, Martin Eden, Rachel A. Elliott, Rachel Howard, Denise Kendrick, Caroline J. Morris, Robin J. Prescott, Glen Swanwick, Matthew Franklin, Koen Putman, Matthew Boyd, Aziz Sheikh
Year: 2012
Source:
Avery AJ, Rodgers S, Cantrill JA, Armstrong S, Cresswell K, Eden M, et al. A pharmacist-led information technology intervention for medication errors (PINCER): A multicentre, cluster randomised, controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis. The Lancet 2012;379:1310-1319, . https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)61817-5.
Publication Place: United Kingdom
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
17
A Pilot Study of the DBT coach: An interactive mobile phone application for individuals with borderline personality disorder and substance use disorder
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Shireen L. Rizvi, Linda A. Dimeff, Julie Skutch, David Carroll, Marsha M. Linehan
Year: 2011
Source:
Rizvi SL, Dimeff LA, Skutch J, Carroll D, Linehan MM. A Pilot Study of the DBT coach: An interactive mobile phone application for individuals with borderline personality disorder and substance use disorder. Behavior Therapy 2011;42:589-600, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
18
A Pilot Trial of Telephone-Based Collaborative Care Management for PTSD Among Iraq/Afghanistan War Veterans
Type: Journal Article
Authors: K. D. Hoerster, M. Jakupcak, K. R. Stephenson, J. J. Fickel, C. E. Simons, A. Hedeen, M. Dwight-Johnson, J. M. Whealin, E. Chaney, B. L. Felker
Year: 2015
Source:
Hoerster KD, Jakupcak M, Stephenson KR, Fickel JJ, Simons CE, Hedeen A, et al. A Pilot Trial of Telephone-Based Collaborative Care Management for PTSD Among Iraq/Afghanistan War Veterans. Telemedicine Journal And E-Health : The Official Journal Of The American Telemedicine Association 2015;21:42-47, . https://doi.org/10.1089/tmj.2013.0337.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Collaborative care and care management are cornerstones of Primary Care-Mental Health Integration (PC-MHI) and have been shown to reduce depressive symptoms. Historically, the standard of Veterans Affairs (VA) collaborative care was referring patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to specialty care. Although referral to evidence-based specialty care is ideal, many veterans with PTSD do not receive such care. To address this issue and reduce barriers to care, VA currently recommends veterans with PTSD be offered treatment within PC-MHI as an alternative. The current project outlines a pilot implementation of an established telephone-based collaborative care model-Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (TIDES)-adapted for Iraq/Afghanistan War veterans with PTSD symptoms (TIDES/PTSD) seen in a postdeployment primary care clinic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Structured medical record extraction and qualitative data collection procedures were used to evaluate acceptability, feasibility, and outcomes. RESULTS: Most participants (n=17) were male (94.1%) and white (70.6%). Average age was 31.2 (standard deviation=6.4) years. TIDES/PTSD was successfully implemented within PC-MHI and was acceptable to patients and staff. Additionally, the total number of care manager calls was positively correlated with number of psychiatry visits (r=0.63, p<0.05) and amount of reduction in PTSD symptoms (r=0.66, p<0.05). Overall, participants in the pilot reported a significant reduction in PTSD symptoms over the course of the treatment (t=2.87, p=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: TIDES can be successfully adapted and implemented for use among Iraq/Afghanistan veterans with PTSD. Further work is needed to test the effectiveness and implementation of this model in other sites and among veterans of other eras.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
19
A randomized feasibility trial of brief telephone counseling to increase fruit and vegetable intakes
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Z. Djuric, J. S. Ellsworth, J. Ren, A. Sen, M. T. Ruffin IV
Year: 2010
Source:
Djuric Z, Ellsworth JS, Ren J, Sen A, Ruffin MT. A randomized feasibility trial of brief telephone counseling to increase fruit and vegetable intakes. Preventive Medicine 2010;50:265-271, . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2010.03.003.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
20
A randomized trial of a depression self-care toolkit with or without lay telephone coaching for primary care patients with chronic physical conditions
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. McCusker, M. G. Cole, M. Yaffe, E. Strumpf, M. Sewitch, T. Sussman, A. Ciampi, K. Lavoie, R. W. Platt, E. Belzile
Year: 2016
Source:
McCusker J, Cole MG, Yaffe M, Strumpf E, Sewitch M, Sussman T, et al. A randomized trial of a depression self-care toolkit with or without lay telephone coaching for primary care patients with chronic physical conditions. General Hospital Psychiatry 2016;40:75-83, . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2016.02.004.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection