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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 9,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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14 Results
2
A Seeking Safety Mobile App for Recovery from PTSD and Substance Use Disorder: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. M. Najavits, E. Cha, M. G. Demce, M. Gupta, A. M. Haney, G. Logounov, A. Miket, M. Morency, A. E. Schulhof
Year: 2024
Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) co-occur frequently and have deleterious impact. Seeking Safety (SS) - an evidence-based, present-focused, coping skills model - lends itself to mobile app delivery. OBJECTIVES: A novel SS mobile app is compared to a control app that lacks the interactivity, social engagement, and feature-richness of the SS app. We hypothesized that the SS app would outperform the control on primary outcome variables (substance use, trauma symptoms) and at least two secondary variables. METHODS: Outpatients with current PTSD and SUD (n = 116) were randomized to the apps; assessed were pre, post (12 weeks), and 3-month follow-up in this online study. RESULTS: The SS app outperformed the control on the primary outcomes, but not on secondary outcomes. Also both conditions evidenced significant change over time from pre to post, with gains sustained at follow-up. External medication and supports during the trial did not differ by condition. CONCLUSION: This first RCT on a SS mobile app had positive results for reduction in substance use and trauma symptoms compared to a control app. This is noteworthy as mental health mobile apps, in general, evidence few positive outcomes. Our substance use finding is also notable as psychosocial interventions in PTSD/SUD populations find it harder to achieve reduction in SUD than trauma symptoms. Our control app may have represented too strong a comparison and weakened our ability to find results on secondary outcomes by condition.

Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
3
Applying User-Centered Design in the Development of a Supportive mHealth App for Women in Substance Use Recovery
Type: Journal Article
Authors: E. R. Eaves, E. Doerry, S. A. Lanzetta, K. M. Kruithoff, K. Negron, K. Dykman, O. Thoney, C. C. Harper
Year: 2023
Abstract:

PURPOSE AND APPROACH: Women in recovery describe stigma, negative treatment, and limited support as barriers to achieving their health and parenting goals. Mobile health technologies carefully tailored to support the unique needs of recovery communities can provide less burdensome alternatives to in-person services for women transitioning out of substance use treatment. An iterative design process integrated women's interests into the structure, content, and interaction flow of a mobile health (mHealth) app. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Participants included women in recovery from opioid, alcohol, and polysubstance use disorders in a comprehensive housing program in urban Arizona. METHODS: Five focus groups with 3-7 participants each (n = 27 total) informed creation of the mHealth app. Informed by theoretical models of usability and person-centered design, development involved an iterative series of focus groups in which we asked women to comment on interest in using each feature. This provided a qualitative priority framework for feature development. We then modified the app and repeated the process to gauge consensus and continually refine our prototype. RESULTS: Women were interested in access to resources, such as housing, counseling, and parenting advice in settings known to treat women in recovery with respect. They also asked for positive messages, chatting with peers, and access to expert answers. They were less interested in points-based learning modules and "scored" activities, leading us to develop a "daily challenges" concept that builds good habits, but does not feel like "classwork". Women's recommendations shaped an mHealth app tailored to maximize utility, access, and safety for this at-risk population. CONCLUSION: Integration of user-centered design with applied ethnographic techniques guided the development of a custom-tailored mHealth app responsive to lived experiences and needs of women in recovery. Future research should evaluate the potential for user-centered apps to increase self-efficacy, perceived social support, and to reduce risk of relapse.

Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
5
Behavior change techniques in popular alcohol reduction apps: Content analysis
Type: Journal Article
Authors: David Crane, Claire Garnett, James Brown, Robert West, Susan Michie
Year: 2015
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
6
Evaluation of CDC Opioid Prescribing and Medisafe Apps
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Biller Krauskopf Patricia
Year: 2017
Publication Place: Philadelphia
Topic(s):
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
7
m-Health applications for responding to drug use and associated harms
Type: Government Report
Authors: Alessandro Pirona, Michael P. Schaub, Jenny Yi-Chen Lee
Year: 2018
Abstract:

The fast developmental pace and widespread use of mobile technology and the internet mean that smartphone-based m-health (mobile health) applications (apps) have huge potential to further expand the reach of and access to drug-related health services towards a common goal of ensuring a healthier Europe. However, m-health for drug users and for health professionals in the field of drugs is still in its infancy and poorly documented at European Union (EU) level. The aim of this scoping study was therefore to carry out a first exploration of available smartphone applications in the drugs field within a European and global context. It explored the range of m-health applications available to users and professionals seeking information, support and advice in a wide range of EU languages. The systematic search of drug-related smartphone applications identified a total of 67 applications across the three main app stores. The identified m-health applications apply various technologies ranging from simple text-based content display to more advanced interactive functions such as video transmission, geo-tagging functions and automated personalised feedback. Based on the main objectives, content and target end-users of the 67 identified apps, three main groups of drug-related m-health applications emerged: apps that aim to disseminate drug-related information and advice, apps that provide interventions and support for drug users and apps for capacity building among health professionals. Most m-health apps address risk behaviour associated with drugs in general or drug use in specific settings (e.g. nightlife settings). Some drug-specific apps are available for more commonly used drugs such as cannabis and cocaine. A number of challenges for users, app developers and policymakers were identified in this scoping study. The lack of scientific evaluations of drug-related m-health interventions is concerning considering the increasing interest in and availability of such apps. Additionally, the lack of quality control of the content of these apps available to EU citizens, with no age limits, remains to be addressed. Global differences in therapeutic approaches used in the identified apps were apparent, especially between the United States and Europe, and this raises questions about the cross-cultural relevance of m-health applications. At the same time, the impact of the new EU General Data Protection Regulation may be of particular relevance in a context of fast global development of drug-related m-health apps available to EU citizens.

Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

9
Perspectives of Canadian Healthcare and Harm Reduction Workers on Mobile Overdose Response Services: A Qualitative Study
Type: Journal Article
Authors: N. Sedaghat, B. Seo, N. Rider, W. Rioux, S. M. Ghosh
Year: 2024
Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Supervised consumption sites (SCS) are an evidence-based intervention proven effective for preventing drug overdose deaths. Obstacles to accessing SCS include stigma, limited hours of operation, concerns about policing, and limited geographic availability. Mobile overdose response services (MORS) are novel technologies that provide virtual supervised consumption to help reduce the risk of fatal overdoses, especially for those who use alone. MORS can take various forms, such as phone-based hotlines and mobile apps. The aim of this article is to assess the perceptions of MORS among healthcare and harm reduction staff to determine if they would be comfortable educating clients about these services. METHODS: Twenty-two healthcare and harm reduction staff were recruited from Canada using convenience, snowball, and purposive sampling techniques to complete semistructured interviews. Inductive thematic analysis informed by grounded theory was used to identify main themes and subthemes. RESULTS: Four themes were identified: (1) increasing MORS awareness among healthcare providers was seen as useful; (2) MORS might lessen the burden of drug overdoses on the healthcare system but could also increase ambulance callouts; (3) MORS would benefit from certain improvements such as providing harm reduction resources and other supports; and (4) MORS are viewed as supplements for harm reduction, but SCS were preferred. CONCLUSIONS: This research provides valuable perspectives from healthcare and harm reduction workers to understand their perception of MORS and identifies key areas of potential improvement. Practical initiatives to improve MORS implementation outcomes exist.

Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
10
Potential Usefulness of Apps and Other Digital Technologies for Improving Access to Behavioral Health in Primary Care
Type: Report
Authors: The Academy for Integrating Behavioral Health & Primary Care
Year: 2023
Publication Place: Rockville, MD
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

11
The patient's voice in the emerging era of participatory medicine
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Dave deBronkart
Year: 2018
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

Professionalism in any field requires keeping pace with change, and nowhere is it more true than medicine. Knowledge flow has changed dramatically since today's accreditation standards were developed, and change continues more rapidly than ever. It's time for a fresh look at how best to achieve care in this altered environment, where valid knowledge may come from the patient as well as from clinician resources: a sociological change driven by technological change. The power structure of the clinical relationship is inevitably altered as constraints on patient knowledge are loosened by the internet, apps, and devices, undermining a paradigm of patients as uninformed recipients of care based on a one-way flow of wisdom from providers. Case after case is presented showing that patients today have generated undeniable value, violating the expectations and assumed best practices of the old model. To understand this sociological (yet scientific) change, this article reviews the role of paradigms in the history of sciences as described in Thomas Kuhn's landmark book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions and describes how these anomalous patient stories force the conclusion that the traditional paradigm of patients is no longer supportable and a new paradigm is needed. This in turn means our standards of professionalism and appropriate care must be updated, lest we fail to achieve best possible care in our increasingly overburdened system. Our new standard must be to teach clinicians to recognize, welcome, and work with empowered "e-patients" in the new model of participatory medicine.

12
Training health providers to address unhealthy alcohol use in primary care: a cross-sectional, multicenter study
Type: Journal Article
Authors: E. Romero-Rodríguez, L. Á. Pérula de Torres, Ruiz Moral, J. Á. Fernández García, J. M. Parras Rejano, Roldán Villalobos, Camarelles Guillem, Collaborative Group Alco-AP
Year: 2020
Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Health professionals' training is a key element to address unhealthy alcohol use in Primary Care (PC). Education about alcohol use can be effective in improving PC provider's knowledge and skills addressing alcohol-related problems. The aim of the study was to evaluate the training of health professionals to address unhealthy alcohol use in PC. METHODS: An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional, multicenter study was performed. LOCATION: PC centres of the Spanish National Health System (SNHS). PARTICIPANTS: Family physicians, residents and nurses completed an online questionnaire that inquired about their training (none, basic, medium or advanced), knowledge and preventive practices aimed at reducing unhealthy alcohol use. The study population was recruited via random sampling, stratified by the regions of the SNHS's PC centre, and by email invitation to members of two Spanish scientific societies of Family Medicine. RESULTS: A total of 1760 professionals participated in the study. Sixty-seven percent (95% CI: 67.5-71.8) reported not having received specific training to address unhealthy alcohol use, 30% (95% CI: 27.4-31.7) reported having received basic training, and 3% (95% CI: 2.3-4.0) medium/advanced training. The training received was greater in younger providers (p < 0.001) who participated in the PAPPS (Preventive Activities and Health Promotion Programme) (p < 0.001). Higher percentages of providers with intermediate or advanced training reported performing screening for unhealthy alcohol use (p < 0.001), clinical assessment of alcohol consumption (p < 0.001), counselling of patients to reduce their alcohol intake (p < 0.001) or to abstain, in the cases of pregnant women and drivers (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Our study reveals a low level of training among Spanish PC providers to address unhealthy alcohol use. A higher percentage of screening, clinical assessment and counselling interventions aimed at reducing unhealthy alcohol use was reported by health professionals with an intermediate or advanced level of training.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
13
Use and perceptions of mobile apps for patients among VA primary care mental and behavioral health providers
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Katherine E. Miller, Eric Kuhn, Jessica Yu, Jason E. Owen, Beth K. Jaworski, Katherine Taylor, Daniel M. Blonigen, Kyle Possemato
Year: 2019
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
14
Use of Mobile Apps & Stepped-Care Model for Treating Depression in Primary Care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: K. L. Herbert, J. M. M. Brennan
Year: 2023
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection