Literature Collection

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Grey Literature

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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 9,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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169 Results
1
"Did I Do as Best as the System Would Let Me?" Healthcare Professional Views on Hospital to Home Care Transitions
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Melinda M. Davis, Meg Devoe, Devan Kansagara, Christina Nicolaidis, Honora Englander
Year: 2012
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
3
A collaborative care lexicon for asking practice and research development questions: A national agenda for research in collaborative care
Type: Government Report
Authors: C. J. Peek
Year: 2011
Publication Place: Rockville, M.D.
Abstract: The Collaborative Care Research Network (CCRN), a sub-network of the American Academy of Family Physicians National Research Network and a practice-based research network, was formed to develop and implement a national, practice-based research agenda to evaluate the effectiveness of collaboration between behavioral health/substance abuse clinicians and primary medical care clinicians. Although research to date generally confirms positive outcomes from collaborative care, it is not clear just what components or methods account for those positive outcomes. Funding agencies and policymakers would like to know that so they can make focused investments in this area, particularly in context of the patient-centered medical home. The CCRN is designed to pose and answer such research questions in a way that can be understood consistently across geographically diverse practices. But experiences framing such research questions led to confusion about the meanings of terms in common use, especially regarding the components or dimensions of collaborative care that are the subject of research questions. Funding agencies and policymakers need consistently articulated concepts for this new scientific field rather than the highly variable language for these concepts presently in use. This lexicon or conceptual system for the field was created and used to formulate research questions as a product for Agency for Healthcare Researchand Quality (AHRQ). Such conceptual clarity, or pre-empirical work, has preceded the empirical triumphs we associate with mature scientific fields and is expected to release much more focused energy for empirical investigation in this field as well.
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
,
Grey Literature See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

4
A collaborative model for integrated mental and physical health care for the individual who is seriously and persistently mentally ill: The Washtenaw Community Health Organization
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Kathleen M. Reynolds, Barbara K. Chesney, Jeff Capobianco
Year: 2006
Topic(s):
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
,
Key & Foundational See topic collection
5
A Consensus Operational Definition of Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH): Also known as Health Care Home
Type: Report
Authors: C. J. Peek, G. Oftedahl
Year: 2010
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
,
Grey Literature See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

6
A look to the past, directions for the future
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. P. Quirk, G. Simon, J. Todd, T. Horst, M. Crosier, B. Ekorenrud, R. Goepfert, N. Baker, B. Steinfeld, M. Rosenberg, K. Strosahl
Year: 2000
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
7
A multifaceted intervention to improve treatment of depression in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: W. Katon, P. Robinson, M. Von Korff, E. Lin, T. Bush, E. Ludman, G. Simon, E. Walker
Year: 1996
Publication Place: UNITED STATES
Abstract: BACKGROUND: This research study evaluates the effectiveness of a multifaceted intervention program to improve the management of depression in primary care. METHODS: One hundred fifty-three primary care patients with current depression were entered into a randomized controlled trial. Intervention patients received a structured depression treatment program in the primary care setting that included both behavioral treatment to increase use of adaptive coping strategies and counseling to improve medication adherence. Control patients received "usual" care by their primary care physicians. Outcome measures included adherence to antidepressant medication, satisfaction with care of depression and with antidepressant treatment, and reduction of depressive symptoms over time. RESULTS: At 4-month follow-up, significantly more intervention patients with major and minor depression than usual care patients adhered to antidepressant medication and rated the quality of care they received for depression as good to excellent. Intervention patients with major depression demonstrated a significantly greater decrease in depression severity over time compared with usual care patients on all 4 outcome analyses. Intervention patients with minor depression were found to have a significant decrease over time in depression severity on only 1 of 4 study outcome analyses compared with usual care patients. CONCLUSION: A multifaceted primary care intervention improved adherence to antidepressant regimens and satisfaction with care in patients with major and minor depression. The intervention consistently resulted in more favorable depression outcomes among patients with major depression, while outcome effects were ambiguous among patients with minor depression.
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
8
A new resolution for global mental health
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. S. Hock, F. Or, K. Kolappa, M. D. Burkey, P. J. Surkan, W. W. Eaton
Year: 2012
Publication Place: England
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
9
A response to "Joint principles: Integrating behavioral health care into the patient-centered medical home".
Type: Journal Article
Authors: William J. Doherty, Jennifer L. Hodgson, Angela L. Lamson, Tai J. Mendenhall, Tracy Todd
Year: 2014
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
10
A standard framework for levels of integrated healthcare
Type: Government Report
Authors: B. Heath, Wise Romero, K. Reynolds
Year: 2013
Publication Place: Washington, DC
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Key & Foundational See topic collection
,
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

11
A typology of prescription drug monitoring programs: A latent transition analysis of the evolution of programs from 1999 to 2016
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Nathan Smith, Silvia S. Martins, June Kim, Ariadne Rivera‐Aguirre, David S. Fink, Alvaro Castillo‐Carniglia, Stephen G. Henry, Stephen J. Mooney, Brandon D. L. Marshall, Corey Davis, Magdalena Cerdá
Year: 2018
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
,
Key & Foundational See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
12
Addressing the workforce crisis in integrated primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: F. A. Blount, B. F. Miller
Year: 2009
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Training and education in integrated primary care is limited. We see a need for addressing the looming workforce shortage as behavioral health services in primary care become more widely implemented. Bringing mental health clinicians straight from specialty mental health settings into primary care often results in program failure due to poor skills fit, assumptions about services needed, and routines of practice these clinicians bring from their specialty settings. Health psychology graduate programs tend to prepare graduates for specialty research and practice in medical settings rather than preparing them for the pace, culture and broad spectrum of needs in primary care. Family medicine residency programs provide an underutilized resource for training primary care psychologists and family physicians together. Even if comprehensive graduate training programs in integrated primary care were developed, they could not begin to meet the need for behavioral health clinicians in primary care that the present expansion will require. In response to the demand for mental health providers in primary care, new initiatives have emerged which attempt to provide training for the preexisting mental health workforce to enable their successful integration into primary care settings.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Key & Foundational See topic collection
13
An Intervention special issue: Integrating mental health care into existing systems of health care: during and after complex humanitarian emergencies
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Peter Ventevogel, Pau Perez-Sales, Alberto Fernandez Liria, Florence K. Baingana
Year: 2011
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
14
Barriers to physical and mental condition integrated service delivery
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. G. Kathol, M. Butler, D. D. McAlpine, R. L. Kane
Year: 2010
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To assess pragmatic challenges faced when implementing, delivering, and sustaining models of integrated mental health intervention in primary care settings. Thirty percent of primary care patients with chronic medical conditions and up to 80% of those with health complexity have mental health comorbidity, yet primary care clinics rarely include onsite mental health professionals and only one in eight patients receive evidence-based mental health treatment. Integrating specialty mental health into primary care improves outcomes for patients with common disorders, such as depression. METHODS: We used key informant interviews documenting barriers to implementation and components that inhibited or enhanced operational success at 11 nationally established integrated physical and mental condition primary care programs. RESULTS: All but one key informant indicated that the greatest barrier to the creation and sustainability of integrated mental condition care in primary care settings was financial challenges introduced by segregated physical and mental health reimbursement practices. For integrated physical and mental health program initiation and outcome changing care to be successful, key components included a clinical and administrative champion-led culture shift, which valued an outcome orientation; cross-disciplinary training and accountability; use of care managers; consolidated clinical record systems; a multidisease, total population focus; and active, respectful coordination of colocated interdisciplinary clinical services. CONCLUSIONS: Correction of disparate physical and mental health reimbursement practices is an important activity in the development of sustainable integrated physical and mental condition care in primary care settings, such as a medical home. Multiple clinical, administrative, and economic factors contribute to operational success.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Key & Foundational See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
15
Behavioral health integration: A critical component of primary care and the patient-centered medical home.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Marci Nielsen
Year: 2014
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
16
Behavioral health outreach: Integrating medical and behavioral health care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Francisca Azocar, Elizabeth Ciemins, Dolores Kelleher
Year: 2006
Publication Place: US: American Psychiatric Assn
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
17
Better integration of mental health care improves depression screening and treatment in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. L. Phillips Jr, B. F. Miller, S. M. Petterson, B. Teevan
Year: 2011
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
18
Better practices in collaborative mental health care: an analysis of the evidence base
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. A. Craven, R. Bland
Year: 2006
Publication Place: Canada
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To conduct a systematic review of the experimental literature in order to identify better practices in collaborative mental health care in the primary care setting. METHODS: A review of Canadian and international literature using Medline, PsycInfo, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and other databases yielded over 900 related reports, of which, 38 studies met the inclusion criteria. A systematic review and descriptive analysis is presented, with key conclusions and best practices. RESULTS: Successful collaboration requires preparation, time, and supportive structures, building on preexisting clinical relationships. Collaborative practice is likely to be most developed when clinicians are colocated and most effective when the location is familiar and nonstigmatizing for patients. Degree of collaboration does not appear to predict clinical outcome. Enhanced collaboration paired with treatment guidelines or protocols offers important benefits over either intervention alone in major depression. Systematic follow-up was a powerful predictor of positive outcome in collaborative care for depression. A clear relation between collaborative efforts to increase medication adherence and clinical outcomes was not evident. Collaboration alone has not been shown to produce skill transfer in PCP knowledge or behaviours in the treatment of depression. Service restructuring designed to support changes in practice patterns of primary health care providers is also required. Enhanced patient education was part of many studies with good outcomes. Education was generally provided by someone other than the PCP. Collaborative interventions that are part of a research protocol may be difficult to sustain long-term without ongoing funding. Consumer choice about treatment modality may be important in treatment engagement in collaborative care (for example, having the option to choose psychotherapy vs medication). CONCLUSIONS: A body of experimental literature evaluating the impact of enhanced collaboration on patient outcomes-primarily in depressive disorders-now exists. Better practices in collaborative mental health care are beginning to emerge.
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
19
Can quality improvement programs for depression in primary care address patient preferences for treatment?
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. Dwight-Johnson, J. Unutzer, C. Sherbourne, L. Tang, K. B. Wells
Year: 2001
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Depression is common in primary care, but rates of adequate care are low. Little is known about the role of patient treatment preferences in encouraging entry into care. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether a primary care based depression quality improvement (QI) intervention designed to accommodate patient and provider treatment choice increases the likelihood that patients enter depression treatment and receive preferred treatment. METHODS: In 46 primary care clinics, patients with current depressive symptoms and either lifetime or current depressive disorder were identified through screening. Treatment preferences, patient characteristics, and use of depression treatments were assessed at baseline and 6 months by patient self-report. Matched clinics were randomized to usual care (UC) or 1 of 2 QI interventions. Data were analyzed using logistic regression models. RESULTS: For patients not in care at baseline, the QI interventions increased rates of entry into depression treatment compared with usual care (adjusted percentage: 50.0% +/- 5.3 and 33.0% +/- 4.9 for interventions vs. 15.9% +/- 3.6 for usual care; F = 12.973, P <0.0001). Patients in intervention clinics were more likely to get treatments they preferred compared with those in usual care (adjusted percentage: 54.2% +/- 3.3 and 50.7% +/- 3.1 for interventions vs. 40.5% +/- 3.1 for usual care; F = 6.034, P <0.003); however, in all clinics less than half of patients preferring counseling reported receiving it. CONCLUSIONS: QI interventions that support patient choice can improve the likelihood of patients receiving preferred treatments. Patient treatment preference appears to be related to likelihood of entering depression treatment, and patients preferring counseling may require additional interventions to enhance entry into treatment.
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
20
Challenges and solutions to integrating mental and physical health care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: B. G. Druss, J. W. Newcomer
Year: 2007
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection