Literature Collection

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Grey Literature

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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 6,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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531 Results
1
"Hub and Spoke:" Vermont's Framework for Medication Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction
Type: Web Resource
Authors: Beth Tanzman, Anthony Folland
Year: 2016
Source:
Tanzman B, Folland A. "Hub and Spoke:" Vermont's Framework for Medication Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction 2016.
Abstract: Webinar - Faced with increasing rates of opioid addiction and insufficient treatment capacity to meet demand for care, Vermont developed a novel framework to expand medication assisted treatment in both Opioid Treatment Programs (OTPs) and Office-Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) settings. Although this initiative initially focuses on medication assisted treatment for individuals with opioid use disorders, it creates a framework for integrating treatment services for other substance abuse issues and co-occurring mental health disorders into the medical home through a managed approach to care. In addition, this treatment approach will help reduce recidivism in corrections and enhance outcomes for families where addiction is an identified problem for child welfare. Note: Viewing of the webinar requires free registration.
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

2
"It goes beyond good camaraderie": A qualitative study of the process of becoming an interprofessional healthcare "teamlet"
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Molly Harrod, Lauren E. Weston, Claire Robinson, Adam Tremblay, Clinton L. Greenstone, Jane Forman
Year: 2016
Source:
Harrod M, Weston LE, Robinson C, Tremblay A, Greenstone CL, Forman J. "It goes beyond good camaraderie": A qualitative study of the process of becoming an interprofessional healthcare "teamlet". Journal Of Interprofessional Care 2016;30.
Publication Place: Abingdon
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
3
"That's why they call it practice".
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Colleen T. Fogarty, Larry B. Mauksch
Year: 2014
Source:
Fogarty CT, Mauksch LB. "That's why they call it practice". Families, Systems, & Health - Vol 32, Iss 4 2014.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
4
A case series of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in a primary care practice
Type: Journal Article
Authors: B. Doolittle, W. Becker
Year: 2011
Source:
Doolittle B, Becker W. A case series of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in a primary care practice. Substance Abuse 2011;32:262-265, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2011.599256.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Physicians' adoption of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment is hindered by concerns over feasibility, cost, and lack of comfort treating patients with addiction. We examined the use of buprenorphine/naloxone in a community practice by two generalist physicians without addiction training, employing a retrospective chart review. From 2006-2010, 228 patients with opiate abuse/dependence were treated with buprenorphine/naloxone using a home-induction protocol. Multiple co-morbidities including diabetes (23% of patients), hypertension (36%), Hepatitis C (43%), and depression (74%) were concurrently managed. In this diverse sample, 1/228 experienced precipitated withdrawal during induction. Of the convenience subsample analyzed (n = 28), 82% (+/-10%) had negative urine drug tests for opioids; 92% (+/-11%) were negative for cocaine; 88% (+/-12%) were positive for buprenorphine. This case series demonstrated feasibility and safety of a low-cost buprenorphine/naloxone home induction protocol employed by generalists. Concurrent treatment of multiple comorbidities conforms with the patient-centered medical home ideal. Randomized trials of this promising approach are needed.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
5
A clustered controlled trial of the implementation and effectiveness of a medical home to improve health care of people with serious mental illness: study protocol
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. S. Young, A. N. Cohen, E. T. Chang, A. W. P. Flynn, A. B. Hamilton, R. Oberman, M. Vinzon
Year: 2018
Source:
Young AS, Cohen AN, Chang ET, Flynn AWP, Hamilton AB, Oberman R, et al. A clustered controlled trial of the implementation and effectiveness of a medical home to improve health care of people with serious mental illness: study protocol. Bmc Health Services Research 2018;18:428+. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-3237-0.
Publication Place: England
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
6
A comparison of assertive community treatment fidelity measures and patient-centered medical home standards
Type: Journal Article
Authors: E. R. Vanderlip, J. M. Cerimele, M. Monroe-Devita
Year: 2013
Source:
Vanderlip ER, Cerimele JM, Monroe-Devita M. A comparison of assertive community treatment fidelity measures and patient-centered medical home standards. Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.c.) 2013;64:1127-1133, . https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201200469.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE This study compared program measures of assertive community treatment (ACT) with standards of accreditation for the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) to determine whether there were similarities in the infrastructure of the two methods of service delivery and whether high-fidelity ACT teams would qualify for medical home accreditation. METHODS The authors compared National Committee for Quality Assurance PCMH standards with two ACT fidelity measures (the Dartmouth Assertive Community Treatment Scale and the Tool for Measurement of Assertive Community Treatment [TMACT]) and with national ACT program standards. RESULTS PCMH standards pertaining to enhanced access and continuity, management of care, and self-care support demonstrated strong overlap across ACT measures. Standards for identification and management of populations, care coordination and follow-up, and quality improvement demonstrated less overlap. The TMACT and the program standards had sufficient overlap to score in the range of a level 1 PCMH, but no ACT measure sufficiently detailed methods of population-based screening and tracking of referrals to satisfy "must-pass" elements of the standards. CONCLUSIONS ACT measures and medical home standards had significant overlap in innate infrastructure. ACT teams following the program standards or undergoing TMACT fidelity review could have the necessary infrastructure to serve as medical homes if they were properly equipped to supervise general medical care and administer activities to improve management of chronic diseases.
Topic(s):
Measures See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
7
A comparison of buprenorphine induction strategies: Patient-centered home-based inductions versus standard-of-care office-based inductions.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Chinazo O. Cunningham, Angela Giovanniello, Xuan Li, Hillary V. Kunins, Robert J. Roose, Nancy L. Sohler
Year: 2011
Source:
Cunningham CO, Giovanniello A, Li X, Kunins HV, Roose RJ, Sohler NL. A comparison of buprenorphine induction strategies: Patient-centered home-based inductions versus standard-of-care office-based inductions. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment 2011;40:349-356, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
8
A comparison of Tier 1 and Tier 3 medical homes under Oklahoma Medicaid program
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. I. Kumar, M. Anthony, S. A. Crawford, R. A. Arky, A. Bitton, G. L. Splinter
Year: 2014
Source:
Kumar JI, Anthony M, Crawford SA, Arky RA, Bitton A, Splinter GL. A comparison of Tier 1 and Tier 3 medical homes under Oklahoma Medicaid program. The Journal Of The Oklahoma State Medical Association 2014;107:157-161, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a team-based model of care that seeks to improve quality of care and control costs. The Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) directs Oklahoma's Medicaid program and contracts with 861 medical home practices across the state in one of three tiers of operational capacity: Tier 1 (Basic), Tier 2 (Advanced) and Tier 3 (Optimal). Only 13.5% (n = 116) homes are at the optimal level; the majority (59%, n = 508) at the basic level. In this study, we sought to determine the barriers that prevented Tier 1 homes from advancing to Tier 3 level and the incentives that would motivate providers to advance from Tier 1 to 3. Our hypotheses were that Tier 1 medical homes were located in smaller practices with limited resources and the providers are not convinced that the expense of advancing from Tier 1 status to Tier 3 status was worth the added value. METHODS: We analyzed OHCA records to compare the 508 Tier 1 (entry-level) with 116 Tier 3 (optimal) medical homes for demographic differences with regards to location: urban or rural, duration as medical home, percentage of contracts that were group contracts, number of providers per group contract, panel age range, panel size, and member-provider ratio. We surveyed all 508 Tier 1 homes with a mail-in survey, and with focused follow up visits to identify the barriers to, and incentives for, upgrading from Tier 1 to Tier 2 or 3. RESULTS: We found that Tier 1 homes were more likely to be in rural areas, run by solo practitioners, serve exclusively adult panels, have smaller panel sizes, and have higher member-to-provider ratios in comparison with Tier 3 homes. Our survey had a 35% response rate. Results showed that the most difficult changes for Tier 1 homes to implement were providing 4 hours of after-hours care and a dedicated program for mental illness and substance abuse. The results also showed that the most compelling incentives for encouraging Tier 1 homes to upgrade their tier status were less"red tape"with prior authorizations, higher pay, and help with panel member follow-up. DISCUSSION: Multiple interventions may help medical homes in Oklahoma advance from the basic to the optimal level such as sharing of resources among nearby practices, expansion of OHCA online resources to help with preauthorizations and patient follow up, and the generation and transmission of data on the benefits of medical homes.
Topic(s):
Medical Home See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
9
A Consensus Operational Definition of Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH): Also known as Health Care Home
Type: Report
Authors: C. J. Peek, G. Oftedahl
Year: 2010
Source:
Peek CJ, Oftedahl G. A Consensus Operational Definition of Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH): Also known as Health Care Home. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI); 2010.
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
,
Grey Literature See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

10
A Difference-in-Difference Analysis of Changes in Quality, Utilization and Cost Following the Colorado Multi-Payer Patient-Centered Medical Home Pilot
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. B. Rosenthal, S. Alidina, M. W. Friedberg, S. J. Singer, D. Eastman, Z. Li, E. C. Schneider
Year: 2016
Source:
Rosenthal MB, Alidina S, Friedberg MW, Singer SJ, Eastman D, Li Z, et al. A Difference-in-Difference Analysis of Changes in Quality, Utilization and Cost Following the Colorado Multi-Payer Patient-Centered Medical Home Pilot. Journal Of General Internal Medicine 2016;31:289-296, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-015-3521-1.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Research on the effects of patient-centered medical homes on quality and cost of care is mixed, so further study is needed to understand how and in what contexts they are effective. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate effects of a multi-payer pilot promoting patient-centered medical home implementation in 15 small and medium-sized primary care groups in Colorado. DESIGN: We conducted difference-in-difference analyses, comparing changes in utilization, costs, and quality between patients attributed to pilot and non-pilot practices. PARTICIPANTS: Approximately 98,000 patients attributed to 15 pilot and 66 comparison practices 2 years before and 3 years after the pilot launch. MAIN MEASURES: Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) derived measures of diabetes care, cancer screening, utilization, and costs to payers. KEY RESULTS: At the end of two years, we found a statistically significant reduction in emergency department use by 1.4 visits per 1000 member months, or approximately 7.9 % (p = 0.02). At the end of three years, pilot practices sustained this difference with 1.6 fewer emergency department visits per 1000 member months, or a 9.3 % reduction from baseline (p = 0.01). Emergency department costs were lower in the pilot practices after two (13.9 % reduction, p < 0.001) and three years (11.8 % reduction, p = 0.001). After three years, compared to control practices, primary care visits in the pilot practices decreased significantly (1.5 % reduction, p = 0.02). The pilot was associated with increased cervical cancer screening after two (12.5 % increase, p < 0.001) and three years (9.0 % increase, p < 0.001), but lower rates of HbA1c testing in patients with diabetes (0.7 % reduction at three years, p = 0.03) and colon cancer screening (21.1 % and 18.1 % at two and three years, respectively, p < 0.001). For patients with two or more comorbidities, similar patterns of association were found, except that there was also a reduction in ambulatory care sensitive inpatient admissions (10.3 %; p = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that a multi-payer, patient-centered medical home initiative that provides financial and technical support to participating practices can produce sustained reductions in utilization with mixed results on process measures of quality.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
11
A logic framework for evaluating social determinants of health interventions in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. S. Coughlin, P. Mann, M. Vernon, L. Young, D. Ayyala, R. Sams, C. Hatzigeorgiou
Year: 2019
Source:
Coughlin SS, Mann P, Vernon M, Young L, Ayyala D, Sams R, et al. A logic framework for evaluating social determinants of health interventions in primary care. Journal Of Hospital Management And Health Policy 2019;3:10.21037/jhmhp.2019.09.03. Epub 2019 Sep 18+.
Publication Place: China
Abstract: Background: Increasing efforts have been made in primary care settings to screen for a broad array of social determinants of health including inadequate food and nutrition, lack of education, unemployment, and inadequate housing, and to refer patients to community resources. Core tenets of primary care include integration with community resources. Methods: In the course of designing a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of a social determinants of health intervention aimed at adult, at-risk, African American primary care clinic patients, our research team developed a logic model to assist with the evaluation of the intervention. Results: In this article, we describe the logic model including elements of the intervention, mediator variables, and outcome variables. Conclusions: The proposed logic framework is likely to be helpful for planning, conducting, and evaluating social determinants of health interventions in primary care settings.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
12
A logic framework for evaluating social determinants of health interventions in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. S. Coughlin, P. Mann, M. Vernon, L. Young, D. Ayyala, R. Sams, C. Hatzigeorgiou
Year: 2019
Source:
Coughlin SS, Mann P, Vernon M, Young L, Ayyala D, Sams R, et al. A logic framework for evaluating social determinants of health interventions in primary care. Journal Of Hospital Management And Health Policy 2019;3:10.21037/jhmhp.2019.09.03. Epub 2019 Sep 18+.
Publication Place: China
Abstract: Background: Increasing efforts have been made in primary care settings to screen for a broad array of social determinants of health including inadequate food and nutrition, lack of education, unemployment, and inadequate housing, and to refer patients to community resources. Core tenets of primary care include integration with community resources. Methods: In the course of designing a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of a social determinants of health intervention aimed at adult, at-risk, African American primary care clinic patients, our research team developed a logic model to assist with the evaluation of the intervention. Results: In this article, we describe the logic model including elements of the intervention, mediator variables, and outcome variables. Conclusions: The proposed logic framework is likely to be helpful for planning, conducting, and evaluating social determinants of health interventions in primary care settings.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
13
A medical home: Changing the way patients and teams relate through patient-centered care plans.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Lora Schwartz Council, Dominic Geffken, Aimee Burke Valeras, John Orzano, Amanda Rechisky, Suzanne Anderson
Year: 2012
Source:
Council LS, Geffken D, Valeras AB, Orzano J, Rechisky A, Anderson S. A medical home: Changing the way patients and teams relate through patient-centered care plans. Families, Systems, & Health 2012;30. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0029832.
Topic(s):
Medical Home See topic collection
14
A meta-analysis of the efficacy of nonphysician brief interventions for unhealthy alcohol use: Implications for the Patient-Centered Medical Home
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. E. Sullivan, J. M. Tetrault, R. S. Braithwaite, B. J. Turner, D. A. Fiellin
Year: 2011
Source:
Sullivan LE, Tetrault JM, Braithwaite RS, Turner BJ, Fiellin DA. A meta-analysis of the efficacy of nonphysician brief interventions for unhealthy alcohol use: Implications for the Patient-Centered Medical Home. The American Journal On Addictions / American Academy Of Psychiatrists In Alcoholism And Addictions 2011;20:343-356, . https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1521-0391.2011.00143.x.
Publication Place: England
Topic(s):
Medical Home See topic collection
15
A national and state profile of leading health problems and health care quality for US children: Key insurance disparities and across-state variations
Type: Journal Article
Authors: C. D. Bethell, M. D. Kogan, B. B. Strickland, E. L. Schor, J. Robertson, P. W. Newacheck
Year: 2011
Source:
Bethell CD, Kogan MD, Strickland BB, Schor EL, Robertson J, Newacheck PW. A national and state profile of leading health problems and health care quality for US children: Key insurance disparities and across-state variations. Academic Pediatrics 2011;11(3) Suppl:33, S22+.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Medical Home See topic collection
16
A new kind of homelessness for individuals with serious mental illness? The need for a "mental health home"
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Thomas E. Smith, Lloyd I. Sederer
Year: 2009
Source:
Smith TE, Sederer LI. A new kind of homelessness for individuals with serious mental illness? The need for a "mental health home". Psychiatric Services 2009;60. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.60.4.528.
Publication Place: US: American Psychiatric Assn
Topic(s):
Medical Home See topic collection
17
A Payer-Guided Approach To Widespread Diffusion Of Behavioral Health Homes In Real-World Settings
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. Schuster, C. Nikolajski, J. Kogan, C. Kang, P. Schake, T. Carney, S. C. Morton, C. F. Reynolds III
Year: 2018
Source:
Schuster J, Nikolajski C, Kogan J, Kang C, Schake P, Carney T, et al. A Payer-Guided Approach To Widespread Diffusion Of Behavioral Health Homes In Real-World Settings. Health Affairs (Project Hope) 2018;37:248-256, . https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2017.1115.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
18
A pharmacy's journey toward the patient-centered medical home
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. Erickson, J. Hambleton
Year: 2011
Source:
Erickson S, Hambleton J. A pharmacy's journey toward the patient-centered medical home. Journal Of The American Pharmacists Association : Japha 2011;51:156-160, . https://doi.org/10.1331/JAPhA.2011.10181.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To describe the integration of a clinic pharmacy with a patient-centered medical home (PCMH). SETTING: Primary care clinic in Monroe, WA, from 1981 to January 2011. PRACTICE DESCRIPTION: Pharmacists and physicians with a previous working relationship in a family practice residency program established colocated practices in 1981. In addition to traditional pharmacy services, collaborative practice agreements were developed and clinical pharmacy services expanded over time. Reimbursement challenges for clinical pharmacy services existed in the fee-for-service environment. The acquisition of the clinic and pharmacy by Providence Health and Services created a new financial alignment with additional opportunities for collaboration. PRACTICE INNOVATION: An internally funded grant established a PCMH pilot that included pharmacist participation. PCMH pharmacists and the care provider team identified areas to improve physician and clinic efficiencies and to enhance patient care. RESULTS: Clinical pharmacy services expanded under the PCMH model. Pharmacist activities included value-added refill authorization services, coordinated patient visits with the PCMH pharmacist and physicians, medication therapy management, diabetes and anticoagulation services, hospital discharge medication reconciliation, and participation in the shared medical appointment. CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacy services are woven into the PCMH fabric of this clinic. New pharmacists will be challenged and rewarded in this evolving health care model.
Topic(s):
Medical Home See topic collection
19
A primary care-public health partnership addressing homelessness, serious mental illness, and health disparities
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. C. Weinstein, M. D. Lanoue, J. D. Plumb, H. King, B. Stein, S. Tsemberis
Year: 2013
Source:
Weinstein LC, Lanoue MD, Plumb JD, King H, Stein B, Tsemberis S. A primary care-public health partnership addressing homelessness, serious mental illness, and health disparities. Journal Of The American Board Of Family Medicine : Jabfm 2013;26:279-287, . https://doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2013.03.120239.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: People with histories of homelessness and serious mental illness experience profound health disparities. Housing First is an evidenced-based practice that is working to end homelessness for these individuals through a combination of permanent housing and community-based supports. METHODS: The Jefferson Department of Family and Community Medicine and a Housing First agency, Pathways to Housing-PA, has formed a partnership to address multiple levels of health care needs for this group. We present a preliminary program evaluation of this partnership using the framework of the patient-centered medical home and the "10 Essential Public Health Services." RESULTS: Preliminary program evaluation results suggest that this partnership is evolving to function as an integrated person-centered health home and an effective local public health monitoring system. CONCLUSION: The Pathways to Housing-PA/Jefferson Department of Family and Community Medicine partnership represents a community of solution, and multiple measures provide preliminary evidence that this model is feasible and can address the "grand challenges" of integrated community health services.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
20
A randomized, controlled trial of implementing the patient-centered medical home model in solo and small practices.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Judith Fifield, Deborah Dauser Forrest, Melanie Martin-Peele, Joseph A. Burleson, Jeanette Goyzueta, Marco Fujimoto, William Gillespie
Year: 2013
Source:
Fifield J, Forrest DD, Martin-Peele M, Burleson JA, Goyzueta J, Fujimoto M, et al. A randomized, controlled trial of implementing the patient-centered medical home model in solo and small practices. Journal Of General Internal Medicine 2013;28:770-777, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-012-2197-z.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection