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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 8,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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1
"Study protocol for a randomized control trial to investigate the effectiveness of an 8-week mindfulness-integrated cognitive behavior therapy (MiCBT) transdiagnostic group intervention for primary care patients": Correction
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Sarah Francis, Frances Shawyer, Bruno Cayoun, Joanne Enticott, Graham Meadows
Year: 2020
Source:
Francis S, Shawyer F, Cayoun B, Enticott J, Meadows G. "Study protocol for a randomized control trial to investigate the effectiveness of an 8-week mindfulness-integrated cognitive behavior therapy (MiCBT) transdiagnostic group intervention for primary care patients": Correction. Bmc Psychiatry 2020;20:1+. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-019-2411-1.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
2
A case study evaluation of a community multidisciplinary team in South East England using a mixed-method approach
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. W. Muscat
Year: 2020
Source:
Muscat JW. A case study evaluation of a community multidisciplinary team in South East England using a mixed-method approach. The British Journal Of General Practice : The Journal Of The Royal College Of General Practitioners 2020;70. https://doi.org/10.3399/bjgp20X711569.
Publication Place: England
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
3
A comparison of assertive community treatment fidelity measures and patient-centered medical home standards
Type: Journal Article
Authors: E. R. Vanderlip, J. M. Cerimele, M. Monroe-Devita
Year: 2013
Source:
Vanderlip ER, Cerimele JM, Monroe-Devita M. A comparison of assertive community treatment fidelity measures and patient-centered medical home standards. Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.c.) 2013;64:1127-1133, . https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201200469.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE This study compared program measures of assertive community treatment (ACT) with standards of accreditation for the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) to determine whether there were similarities in the infrastructure of the two methods of service delivery and whether high-fidelity ACT teams would qualify for medical home accreditation. METHODS The authors compared National Committee for Quality Assurance PCMH standards with two ACT fidelity measures (the Dartmouth Assertive Community Treatment Scale and the Tool for Measurement of Assertive Community Treatment [TMACT]) and with national ACT program standards. RESULTS PCMH standards pertaining to enhanced access and continuity, management of care, and self-care support demonstrated strong overlap across ACT measures. Standards for identification and management of populations, care coordination and follow-up, and quality improvement demonstrated less overlap. The TMACT and the program standards had sufficient overlap to score in the range of a level 1 PCMH, but no ACT measure sufficiently detailed methods of population-based screening and tracking of referrals to satisfy "must-pass" elements of the standards. CONCLUSIONS ACT measures and medical home standards had significant overlap in innate infrastructure. ACT teams following the program standards or undergoing TMACT fidelity review could have the necessary infrastructure to serve as medical homes if they were properly equipped to supervise general medical care and administer activities to improve management of chronic diseases.
Topic(s):
Measures See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
4
A comparison of common screening methods for predicting aberrant drug-related behavior among patients receiving opioids for chronic pain management
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. M. Moore, T. Jones, J. H. Browder, S. Daffron, S. D. Passik
Year: 2009
Source:
Moore TM, Jones T, Browder JH, Daffron S, Passik SD. A comparison of common screening methods for predicting aberrant drug-related behavior among patients receiving opioids for chronic pain management. Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.) 2009;10:1426-1433, . https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4637.2009.00743.x.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The ability to predict risk for violating opioid medication policies, known as aberrant drug-related behavior, is critical for providing optimal treatment. Many pain management centers measure risk using one of several partially validated measures: the Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain (SOAPP), the Diagnosis, Intractability, Risk, and Efficacy inventory (DIRE), and/or the Opioid Risk Tool (ORT). However, little is known about how these measures compare with each other in predicting aberrant drug-related behavior and discontinuance of opioid pain medications. The current study aimed to address this research question. PATIENTS: Participants were 48 patients who attended a pain management center in Tennessee but were later discontinued from opioids for aberrant drug-related behavior. Patients referred for opioid medication for pain management participated in a semi-structured clinical interview with the staff psychologist and completed the aforementioned measures. Patients generally returned to the pain clinic on a monthly basis for medication management. Results. Analyses compared the sensitivity of each self-report measure and the clinical interview in predicting discontinuance for aberrant drug-related behavior. RESULTS: showed the highest sensitivity for the clinical interview (0.77) and the SOAPP (0.72), followed by the ORT (0.45) and the DIRE (0.17). Combining the clinical interview with the SOAPP increased sensitivity to 0.90. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients who were discontinued from opioids for aberrant drug-related behaviors, the clinical interview and the SOAPP were most effective at predicting risk at baseline. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
5
A comparison of methods of administering the opioid risk tool
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. Jones, S. D. Passik
Year: 2011
Source:
Jones T, Passik SD. A comparison of methods of administering the opioid risk tool. Journal Of Opioid Management 2011;7:347-351, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Risk assessment and stratification have become important aspects for the prescription of opioids to patients with chronic pain. Recent research has shown that the Opioid Risk Tool (ORT), a widely used risk assessment tool, has poor predictive abilities when compared with other risk assessment methods. This study compares two different methods of administration of the ORT to further study this issue. Patients at a pain practice were given an ORT to complete per the usual method of administration. In addition, a separate blinded ORT was completed by a psychologist after conducting a clinical interview with the patient. The results of the patient-completed ORT (PC-ORT) and the clinician-completed ORT (CC-ORT) were compared. There were significant differences found between the two, with the psychologist usually rating the patient higher in risk. The CC-ORT demonstrated better prediction of aberrant drug-taking behavior than the PC-ORT. The items that were discrepant between the two suggest that the differences were primarily due to comprehension issues. A strategy to help maximize the usefulness of the ORT derived from this finding and clinical experience is discussed.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
6
A comparison of various risk screening methods in predicting discharge from opioid treatment
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. Jones, T. Moore, J. L. Levy, S. Daffron, J. H. Browder, L. Allen, S. D. Passik
Year: 2012
Source:
Jones T, Moore T, Levy JL, Daffron S, Browder JH, Allen L, et al. A comparison of various risk screening methods in predicting discharge from opioid treatment. The Clinical Journal Of Pain 2012;28:93-100, . https://doi.org/10.1097/AJP.0b013e318225da9e.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: Risk assessment and stratification has become an important aspect of the prescribing of opioids to patients with chronic pain. There is little empirical data available on the sensitivity and specificity of commonly used risk assessment tools. This paper describes 2 studies that compare the prediction capabilities of various risk assessment tools. METHODS: The first study presents data on patients at a pain practice whose treatment with opioids was stopped due to their engaging in aberrant drug-related behavior. Patients were assessed with the Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain-Revised (SOAPP-R), the Pain Medication Questionnaire, the Opioid Risk Tool, and a clinical interview. A second study compared the risk assessment measures, SOAPP-R, Pain Medication Questionnaire, Opioid Risk Tool, and a clinical interview. Data were gathered on whether patients had engaged in aberrant drug-related behavior at 6-month follow-up. RESULTS: Significant differences in the measures were found. Accuracy did not appear to be a function of the type of aberrant drug-related behavior that the patient engaged in for any of the measures. The clinical interview showed the best sensitivity of the 4 risk measures in predicting risk. The SOAPP-R showed the best sensitivity of the self-report measures. However, the SOAPP-R appears to overrate risk. DISCUSSION: Overall, these studies indicate that not all risk assessment tools are equal in their ability to accurately predict future aberrant drug-related behavior. It may be that written risk assessment tools that use more subtle items are better suited to certain patient populations.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
7
A method for assessing treatment history and cost for substance use disorder
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. Westermeyer, P. Thuras
Year: 2006
Source:
Westermeyer J, Thuras P. A method for assessing treatment history and cost for substance use disorder. Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment 2006;5:67-76, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
8
A mixed-methods study of applied team integration for opioid use disorder treatment in rural settings
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Michael Campbell, Robert Lucio, Suzie T. Cashwell, James Cowser
Year: 2022
Source:
Campbell M, Lucio R, Cashwell ST, Cowser J. A mixed-methods study of applied team integration for opioid use disorder treatment in rural settings. Journal Of Social Work Practice In The Addictions 2022. https://doi.org/10.1080/1533256X.2022.2054155.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
9
A Multi-sourced Data Analytics Approach to Measuring and Assessing Biopsychosocial Complexity: The Vancouver Community Analytics Tool Complexity Module (VCAT-CM)
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. R. Shukor, R. Joe, G. Sincraian, N. Klazinga, D. S. Kringos
Year: 2019
Source:
Shukor AR, Joe R, Sincraian G, Klazinga N, Kringos DS. A Multi-sourced Data Analytics Approach to Measuring and Assessing Biopsychosocial Complexity: The Vancouver Community Analytics Tool Complexity Module (VCAT-CM). Community Mental Health Journal 2019;55:1326-1343, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-019-00417-5.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

Operationalization of the fundamental building blocks of primary care (i.e. empanelment, team-based care and population management) within the context of Community Health Centers requires accurate and real-time measures of biopsychosocial complexity, at both client and population-levels. This article describes the conceptualization, design and development of a novel software tool (the VCAT-Complexity Module) that can calculate and report real-time person-oriented biopsychosocial complexity profiles, using multiple data sources. The tool aligns with a profile approach to conceptualizing health outcomes, and represents a potentially significant advance over disease-oriented complexity assessment tools. The results and face validity of the software's complexity score outputs are discussed, along with their practical implications on functions related to the development of primary care within Vancouver Coastal Health, a Canadian Regional Health Authority.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
10
A Novel Approach to Depression Care: Efficacy of an Adapted Interpersonal Therapy in a Large, Urban Primary Care Setting
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Kenneth M. Fifer, Katherine Small, Samantha Herrera, Yang Doris Liu, Peccoralo Lauren
Year: 2021
Source:
Fifer KM, Small K, Herrera S, Liu YD, Lauren P. A Novel Approach to Depression Care: Efficacy of an Adapted Interpersonal Therapy in a Large, Urban Primary Care Setting. Psychiatric Quarterly 2021;92:63-72, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11126-020-09750-5.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
11
A novel approach to depression care: Efficacy of an adapted interpersonal therapy in a large, urban primary care setting
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Kenneth M. Fifer, Katherine Small, Samantha Herrera, Yang Doris Liu, Lauren Peccoralo
Year: 2020
Source:
Fifer KM, Small K, Herrera S, Liu YD, Peccoralo L. A novel approach to depression care: Efficacy of an adapted interpersonal therapy in a large, urban primary care setting. Psychiatric Quarterly 2020. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11126-020-09750-5.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
12
A pilot study into the problematic use of opioid analgesics in chronic non-cancer pain patients
Type: Journal Article
Authors: D. T. Cowan, L. Allan, P. Griffiths
Year: 2002
Source:
Cowan DT, Allan L, Griffiths P. A pilot study into the problematic use of opioid analgesics in chronic non-cancer pain patients. International Journal Of Nursing Studies 2002;39:59-69, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
13
A pilot study of the functionality and clinician acceptance of a clinical decision support tool to improve primary care of opioid use disorder
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Rebecca C. Rossom, JoAnn Sperl-Hillen, Patrick J. O’Connor, A. L. Crain, Laurel Nightingale, Anne Pylkas, Kristen V. Huntley, Bart Gavin
Year: 2021
Source:
Rossom RC, Sperl-Hillen JA, O’Connor PJ, Crain AL, Nightingale L, Pylkas A, et al. A pilot study of the functionality and clinician acceptance of a clinical decision support tool to improve primary care of opioid use disorder. Addiction Science & Clinical Practice 2021;16:1-11, . https://doi.org/10.1186/s13722-021-00245-7.
Publication Place: London
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
14
A Primary Care-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention for Long-Term Opioid Users With Chronic Pain : A Randomized Pragmatic Trial
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. Debar, M. Mayhew, L. Benes, A. Bonifay, R. A. Deyo, C. R. Elder, F. J. Keefe, M. C. Leo, C. McMullen, A. Owen-Smith, D. H. Smith, C. M. Trinacty, W. M. Vollmer
Year: 2022
Source:
Debar L, Mayhew M, Benes L, Bonifay A, Deyo RA, Elder CR, et al. A Primary Care-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Intervention for Long-Term Opioid Users With Chronic Pain : A Randomized Pragmatic Trial. Annals Of Internal Medicine 2022;175:46-55, . https://doi.org/10.7326/M21-1436.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is common, disabling, and costly. Few clinical trials have examined cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions embedded in primary care settings to improve chronic pain among those receiving long-term opioid therapy. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a group-based CBT intervention for chronic pain. DESIGN: Pragmatic, cluster randomized controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02113592). SETTING: Kaiser Permanente health care systems in Georgia, Hawaii, and the Northwest. PARTICIPANTS: Adults (aged ≥18 years) with mixed chronic pain conditions receiving long-term opioid therapy. INTERVENTION: A CBT intervention teaching pain self-management skills in 12 weekly, 90-minute groups delivered by an interdisciplinary team (behaviorist, nurse, physical therapist, and pharmacist) versus usual care. MEASUREMENTS: Self-reported pain impact (primary outcome, as measured by the PEGS scale [pain intensity and interference with enjoyment of life, general activity, and sleep]) was assessed quarterly over 12 months. Pain-related disability, satisfaction with care, and opioid and benzodiazepine use based on electronic health care data were secondary outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 850 patients participated, representing 106 clusters of primary care providers (mean age, 60.3 years; 67.4% women); 816 (96.0%) completed follow-up assessments. Intervention patients sustained larger reductions on all self-reported outcomes from baseline to 12-month follow-up; the change in PEGS score was -0.434 point (95% CI, -0.690 to -0.178 point) for pain impact, and the change in pain-related disability was -0.060 point (CI, -0.084 to -0.035 point). At 6 months, intervention patients reported higher satisfaction with primary care (difference, 0.230 point [CI, 0.053 to 0.406 point]) and pain services (difference, 0.336 point [CI, 0.129 to 0.543 point]). Benzodiazepine use decreased more in the intervention group (absolute risk difference, -0.055 [CI, -0.099 to -0.011]), but opioid use did not differ significantly between groups. LIMITATION: The inclusion of only patients with insurance in large integrated health care systems limited generalizability, and the clinical effect of change in scores is unclear. CONCLUSION: Primary care-based CBT, using frontline clinicians, produced modest but sustained reductions in measures of pain and pain-related disability compared with usual care but did not reduce use of opioid medication. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: National Institutes of Health.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
15
A Program Evaluation of Behavioral Health Integration in a Freestanding Birth Center
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. Holmquist, A. F. R. Fischl, N. A. Niemczyk
Year: 2021
Source:
Holmquist J, Fischl AFR, Niemczyk NA. A Program Evaluation of Behavioral Health Integration in a Freestanding Birth Center. The Journal Of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing 2021;35:29-36, . https://doi.org/10.1097/JPN.0000000000000533.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
16
A promising screening tool for prescription opioid use disorders in older adults?
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Antoine Douaihy
Year: 2016
Source:
Douaihy A. A promising screening tool for prescription opioid use disorders in older adults?. The American Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry 2016;24:637-638, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
17
A prospective test of the negative affect model of substance abuse: Moderating effects of social support (Substance Abuse Scale)
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. R. Measelle, E. Stice, D. W. Springer
Year: 2006
Source:
Measelle JR, Stice E, Springer DW. A prospective test of the negative affect model of substance abuse: Moderating effects of social support (Substance Abuse Scale). Psychology Of Addictive Behaviors 2006;20:225-233, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
18
A Quality Improvement Project to Reduce Postcesarean Opioid Consumption
Type: Journal Article
Authors: K. M. Kahn, K. Demarco, J. Pavsic, J. Sangillo
Year: 2021
Source:
Kahn KM, Demarco K, Pavsic J, Sangillo J. A Quality Improvement Project to Reduce Postcesarean Opioid Consumption. Mcn.the American Journal Of Maternal Child Nursing 2021;46:190-197, . https://doi.org/10.1097/NMC.0000000000000721.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
19
A randomized clinical trial of a theory-based fentanyl overdose education and fentanyl test strip distribution intervention to reduce rates of opioid overdose: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
Type: Journal Article
Authors: B. P. Jacka, J. E. Goldman, J. L. Yedinak, E. Bernstein, S. E. Hadland, J. A. Buxton, S. G. Sherman, K. B. Biello, B. D. L. Marshall
Year: 2020
Source:
Jacka BP, Goldman JE, Yedinak JL, Bernstein E, Hadland SE, Buxton JA, et al. A randomized clinical trial of a theory-based fentanyl overdose education and fentanyl test strip distribution intervention to reduce rates of opioid overdose: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trials 2020;21:020-04898-8, 976+. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-020-04898-8.
Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Opioid overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids, particularly illicitly manufactured fentanyl, remain a substantial public health concern in North America. Responses to overdose events (e.g., administration of naloxone and rescue breathing) are effective at reducing mortality; however, more interventions are needed to prevent overdoses involving illicitly manufactured fentanyl. This study protocol aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a behavior change intervention that incorporates individual counseling, practical training in fentanyl test strip use, and distribution of fentanyl test strips for take-home use among people who use drugs. METHODS: Residents of Rhode Island aged 18-65 years who report recent substance use (including prescription pills obtained from the street; heroin, powder cocaine, crack cocaine, methamphetamine; or any drug by injection) (n = 500) will be recruited through advertisements and targeted street-based outreach into a two-arm randomized clinical trial with 12 months of post-randomization follow-up. Eligible participants will be randomized (1:1) to receive either the RAPIDS intervention (i.e., fentanyl-specific overdose education, behavior change motivational interviewing (MI) sessions focused on using fentanyl test strips to reduce overdose risk, fentanyl test strip training, and distribution of fentanyl test strips for personal use) or standard overdose education as control. Participants will attend MI booster sessions (intervention) or attention-matched control sessions at 1, 2, and 3 months post-randomization. All participants will be offered naloxone at enrolment. The primary outcome is a composite measure of self-reported overdose in the previous month at 6- and/or 12-month follow-up visit. Secondary outcome measures include administratively linked data regarding fatal (post-mortem investigation) and non-fatal (hospitalization or emergency medical service utilization) overdoses. DISCUSSION: If the RAPIDS intervention is found to be effective, its brief MI and fentanyl test strip training components could be easily incorporated into existing community-based overdose prevention programming to help reduce the rates of fentanyl-related opioid overdose. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04372238 . Registered on 01 May 2020.

Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
20
A randomized controlled trial of a brief intervention for illicit drugs linked to the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in clients recruited from primary health-care settings in four countries
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. Humeniuk, R. Ali, T. Babor, M. L. Souza-Formigoni, R. B. de Lacerda, W. Ling, B. McRee, D. Newcombe, H. Pal, V. Poznyak, S. Simon, J. Vendetti
Year: 2012
Source:
Humeniuk R, Ali R, Babor T, Souza-Formigoni ML, de Lacerda RB, Ling W, et al. A randomized controlled trial of a brief intervention for illicit drugs linked to the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) in clients recruited from primary health-care settings in four countries. Addiction (Abingdon, England) 2012;107:957-966, . https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03740.x.
Publication Place: England
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection