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The Literature Collection contains over 6,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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1
"Big Eight" Recommendations for Improving the Effectiveness of the U.S. Behavioral Health Care System
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. Karakus, S. S. Ghose, H. H. Goldman, G. Moran, M. F. Hogan
Year: 2017
Source:
Karakus M, Ghose SS, Goldman HH, Moran G, Hogan MF. "Big Eight" Recommendations for Improving the Effectiveness of the U.S. Behavioral Health Care System. Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.c.) 2017;68. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201500532.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: The purpose of this Open Forum is to highlight strategies that can be implemented by federal health care policy makers to improve the delivery of effective behavioral health care services in the public and private sectors. The recommendations can be accomplished by using existing funds or authorities allocated to federal agencies dealing with the behavioral health system. These recommendations do not require new or additional funding and focus on strategies with a track record for success. The strategies described require relatively small changes but have the potential for big impacts.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
2
"Cost-effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy for treatment-resistant depression in primary care: economic evaluation of the CoBalT Trial": Correction.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Sandra Hollinghurst, Fran E. Carroll, Anna Abel, John Campbell, Anne Garland, Bill Jerrom, David Kessler, Willem Kuyken, Jill Morrison, Nicola Ridgway, Laura Thomas, Katrina Turner, Chris Williams, Tim J. Peters, Nicola Wiles, Glyn Lewis
Year: 2014
Source:
Hollinghurst S, Carroll FE, Abel A, Campbell J, Garland A, Jerrom B, et al. "Cost-effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy for treatment-resistant depression in primary care: economic evaluation of the CoBalT Trial": Correction. The British Journal Of Psychiatry 2014;204.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
3
A budget impact analysis of telemedicine-based collaborative care for depression
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. C. Fortney, M. L. Maciejewski, S. P. Tripathi, T. L. Deen, J. M. Pyne
Year: 2011
Source:
Fortney JC, Maciejewski ML, Tripathi SP, Deen TL, Pyne JM. A budget impact analysis of telemedicine-based collaborative care for depression. Medical Care 2011;49:872-880, . https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0b013e31821d2b35.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Patients with depression use more health services than patients without depression. However, when depression symptoms respond to treatment, use of health services declines. Most depression quality improvement studies increase total cost in the short run, which if unevenly distributed across stakeholders, could compromise buy-in and sustainability. The objective of this budget impact analysis was to examine patterns of utilization and cost associated with telemedicine-based collaborative care, an intervention that targets patients treated in small rural primary care clinics. METHODS: Patients with depression were recruited from VA Community-based Outpatient Clinics, and 395 patients were enrolled and randomized to telemedicine-based collaborative care or usual care. Dependent variables representing utilization and cost were collected from administrative data. Independent variables representing clinical casemix were collected from self-report at baseline. RESULTS: There were no significant group differences in the total number or cost of primary care encounters. However, as intended, patients in the intervention group had significantly greater depression-related primary care encounters (marginal effect=0.34, P=0.004) and cost (marginal effect=$61.4, P=0.013) to adjust antidepressant therapy for nonresponders. There were no significant group differences in total mental health encounters or cost. However, as intended, the intervention group had significantly higher depression-related mental health costs (marginal effect=$107.55, P=0.03) due to referrals of treatment-resistant patients. Unexpectedly, patients in the intervention group had significantly greater specialty physical health encounters (marginal effect =0.42, P=0.001) and cost (marginal effect =$490.6, P=0.003), but not depression-related encounters or cost. Overall, intervention patients had a significantly greater total outpatient cost compared with usual care (marginal effect=$599.28, P=0.012). CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that telemedicine-based collaborative care does not increase total workload for primary care or mental health providers. Thus, there is no disincentive for mental health providers to offer telemedicine-based collaborative care or for primary care providers to refer patients to telemedicine-based collaborative care.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
4
A collaborative approach for the care management of geropsychiatric services
Type: Journal Article
Authors: E. Aliberti, C. Basso, E. Schramm
Year: 2011
Source:
Aliberti E, Basso C, Schramm E. A collaborative approach for the care management of geropsychiatric services. Professional Case Management 2011;16:62-68; quiz 69-70, . https://doi.org/10.1097/NCM.0b013e318206a27b.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To share a successful collaborative approach between the medical and behavioral health departments of a managed care organization that improved both utilization rates and management for health plan members with dementia. PRIMARY PRACTICE SETTING: Acute care hospitals FINDINGS/CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant reduction in subsequent hospital admits, beddays, and emergency department visits for this population resulting in a substantial financial savings. Patient outcomes, as well as patient and caregiver satisfaction, was improved. IMPLICATIONS FOR CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: Prior to the implementation of this pilot, there was a gap in services for health plan members experiencing dangerous behavioral issues associated with their dementia diagnosis. Case management of this population was difficult because of the limited options available in our market area. This innovative program afforded a nontraditional approach to inpatient care that maximized case management possibilities for this population.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
5
A Danish cost-effectiveness model of escitalopram in comparison with citalopram and venlafaxine as first-line treatments for major depressive disorder in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. Sorensen, K. B. Stage, N. Damsbo, A. Le Lay, M. E. Hemels
Year: 2007
Source:
Sorensen J, Stage KB, Damsbo N, Le Lay A, Hemels ME. A Danish cost-effectiveness model of escitalopram in comparison with citalopram and venlafaxine as first-line treatments for major depressive disorder in primary care. Nordic Journal Of Psychiatry 2007;61:100-108, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08039480701226070.
Publication Place: Norway
Abstract: The objective of this study was to model the cost-effectiveness of escitalopram in comparison with generic citalopram and venlafaxine in primary care treatment of major depressive disorder (baseline scores 22-40 on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, MADRS) in Denmark. A three-path decision analytic model with a 6-month horizon was used. All patients started at the primary care path and were referred to outpatient or inpatient secondary care in the case of insufficient response to treatment. Model inputs included drug-specific probabilities derived from systematic literature review, ad-hoc survey and expert opinion. Main outcome measures were remission defined as MADRS < or = 12 and treatment costs. Analyses were conducted from healthcare system and societal perspectives. The human capital approach was used to estimate societal cost of lost productivity. Costs were reported in 2004 DDK. The expected overall 6-month remission rate was higher for escitalopram (64.1%) than citalopram (58.9%). From both perspectives, the total expected cost per successfully treated patient was lower for escitalopram (DKK 22,323 healthcare, DKK 72,399 societal) than for citalopram (DKK 25,778 healthcare, DKK 87,786 societal). Remission rates and costs were similar for escitalopram and venlafaxine. Robustness of the findings was verified in multivariate sensitivity analyses. For patients in primary care, escitalopram appears to be a cost-effective alternative to (generic) citalopram, with greater clinical benefit and cost-savings, and similar in cost-effectiveness to venlafaxine.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
6
A Difference-in-Difference Analysis of Changes in Quality, Utilization and Cost Following the Colorado Multi-Payer Patient-Centered Medical Home Pilot
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. B. Rosenthal, S. Alidina, M. W. Friedberg, S. J. Singer, D. Eastman, Z. Li, E. C. Schneider
Year: 2016
Source:
Rosenthal MB, Alidina S, Friedberg MW, Singer SJ, Eastman D, Li Z, et al. A Difference-in-Difference Analysis of Changes in Quality, Utilization and Cost Following the Colorado Multi-Payer Patient-Centered Medical Home Pilot. Journal Of General Internal Medicine 2016;31:289-296, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-015-3521-1.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Research on the effects of patient-centered medical homes on quality and cost of care is mixed, so further study is needed to understand how and in what contexts they are effective. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate effects of a multi-payer pilot promoting patient-centered medical home implementation in 15 small and medium-sized primary care groups in Colorado. DESIGN: We conducted difference-in-difference analyses, comparing changes in utilization, costs, and quality between patients attributed to pilot and non-pilot practices. PARTICIPANTS: Approximately 98,000 patients attributed to 15 pilot and 66 comparison practices 2 years before and 3 years after the pilot launch. MAIN MEASURES: Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) derived measures of diabetes care, cancer screening, utilization, and costs to payers. KEY RESULTS: At the end of two years, we found a statistically significant reduction in emergency department use by 1.4 visits per 1000 member months, or approximately 7.9 % (p = 0.02). At the end of three years, pilot practices sustained this difference with 1.6 fewer emergency department visits per 1000 member months, or a 9.3 % reduction from baseline (p = 0.01). Emergency department costs were lower in the pilot practices after two (13.9 % reduction, p < 0.001) and three years (11.8 % reduction, p = 0.001). After three years, compared to control practices, primary care visits in the pilot practices decreased significantly (1.5 % reduction, p = 0.02). The pilot was associated with increased cervical cancer screening after two (12.5 % increase, p < 0.001) and three years (9.0 % increase, p < 0.001), but lower rates of HbA1c testing in patients with diabetes (0.7 % reduction at three years, p = 0.03) and colon cancer screening (21.1 % and 18.1 % at two and three years, respectively, p < 0.001). For patients with two or more comorbidities, similar patterns of association were found, except that there was also a reduction in ambulatory care sensitive inpatient admissions (10.3 %; p = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that a multi-payer, patient-centered medical home initiative that provides financial and technical support to participating practices can produce sustained reductions in utilization with mixed results on process measures of quality.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
7
A model for managed behavioral health care in an academic department of psychiatry.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: P. J. Fagan, C. W. J. Schmidt, B. Cook
Year: 2002
Source:
Fagan PJ, Schmidt CWJ, Cook B. A model for managed behavioral health care in an academic department of psychiatry. Psychiatr Serv 2002;53:431-436, .
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
8
A model of the economic impact of a bipolar disorder screening program in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. Menzin, M. Sussman, E. Tafesse, C. Duczakowski, P. Neumann, M. Friedman
Year: 2009
Source:
Menzin J, Sussman M, Tafesse E, Duczakowski C, Neumann P, Friedman M. A model of the economic impact of a bipolar disorder screening program in primary care. The Journal Of Clinical Psychiatry 2009;70:1230-1236, . https://doi.org/10.4088/JCP.08m04939.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Unrecognized bipolar disorder in patients presenting with a major depressive episode may lead to delayed diagnosis, inappropriate treatment, and excessive costs. This study models the cost effectiveness of screening for bipolar disorder among adults presenting for the first time with symptoms of major depressive disorder. METHOD: A decision-analysis model was used to evaluate the outcomes and cost over 5 years of screening versus not screening for bipolar disorder. Screening was defined as a 1-time administration of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire at the initial visit followed by referral to a psychiatrist for patients screening positive for bipolar disorder. Health states included correctly diagnosed bipolar disorder, unrecognized bipolar disorder, and correctly diagnosed major depressive episodes. Model outcomes included rates of correct diagnosis of bipolar disorder and discounted costs (2006 US dollars) of screening and treating major depressive episodes. Literature was the primary source of data and was collected from September 2007 through March 2009. RESULTS: According to the model, 1,000 adults in a health plan with 1 million adult members annually present with symptoms of major depressive disorder. An additional 38 patients were correctly diagnosed with depression (unipolar or a major depressive episode) or bipolar disorder (440 with screening vs 402 without screening) through a 1-time screening for bipolar disorder. Estimated 5-year discounted costs per patient were $36,044 without screening and $34,107 with screening (savings of $1,937). Accordingly, total 5-year budgetary savings were estimated at $1.94 million. Results were most sensitive to difference in treatment costs for patients with recognized versus unrecognized bipolar disorder. CONCLUSION: A 1-time screening program for bipolar disorder, when patients first present with a major depressive episode, can reduce health care costs to managed-care plans.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
9
A nationwide survey of patient centered medical home demonstration projects
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Asaf Bitton, Carina Martin, Bruce E. Landon
Year: 2010
Source:
Bitton A, Martin C, Landon BE. A nationwide survey of patient centered medical home demonstration projects. Journal Of General Internal Medicine 2010;25:584-592, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1262-8.
Publication Place: Germany: Springer
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
10
A pilot study of an integrated mental health, social and medical model for diabetes care in an inner-city setting: Three Dimensions for Diabetes (3DFD)
Type: Journal Article
Authors: K. Ismail, K. Stewart, K. Ridge, E. Britneff, R. Freudenthal, D. Stahl, P. McCrone, C. Gayle, A. M. Doherty
Year: 2019
Source:
Ismail K, Stewart K, Ridge K, Britneff E, Freudenthal R, Stahl D, et al. A pilot study of an integrated mental health, social and medical model for diabetes care in an inner-city setting: Three Dimensions for Diabetes (3DFD). Diabetic Medicine : A Journal Of The British Diabetic Association 2019. https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.13918.
Publication Place: England
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
11
A Primary Care Prevention System for Behavioral Health: The Behavioral Health Annual Wellness Checkup
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. Zimmermann, W. O'Donohue, C. Vechiu
Year: 2019
Source:
Zimmermann M, O'Donohue W, Vechiu C. A Primary Care Prevention System for Behavioral Health: The Behavioral Health Annual Wellness Checkup. Journal Of Clinical Psychology In Medical Settings 2019. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10880-019-09658-8.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Behavioral health problems are involved in the majority of primary care visits. These behavior disorders (e.g., depression, anxiety, smoking, insomnia, etc.) are costly, burdensome to both the patient and the healthcare system, and result in greater medical utilization/cost and poorer future health outcomes. Integrated behavioral healthcare has been proposed as a model for more efficiently addressing the burden of behavioral health problems. While this model has demonstrated some promise in the treatment of behavioral health problems, as well as in the reduction in costs and improvement in healthcare outcomes, the primary prevention of behavioral health problems in this delivery model has been relatively neglected. The present paper discusses the potential value of incorporating the prevention of behavioral health problems into the annual physical/wellness checkup and proposes a detailed system for how this might be accomplished. Limitations, future research, and costs associated with increased prevention in a primary care context are discussed.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
12
A Primary Care Prevention System for Behavioral Health: The Behavioral Health Annual Wellness Checkup
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. Zimmermann, W. O'Donohue, C. Vechiu
Year: 2019
Source:
Zimmermann M, O'Donohue W, Vechiu C. A Primary Care Prevention System for Behavioral Health: The Behavioral Health Annual Wellness Checkup. Journal Of Clinical Psychology In Medical Settings 2019. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10880-019-09658-8.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Behavioral health problems are involved in the majority of primary care visits. These behavior disorders (e.g., depression, anxiety, smoking, insomnia, etc.) are costly, burdensome to both the patient and the healthcare system, and result in greater medical utilization/cost and poorer future health outcomes. Integrated behavioral healthcare has been proposed as a model for more efficiently addressing the burden of behavioral health problems. While this model has demonstrated some promise in the treatment of behavioral health problems, as well as in the reduction in costs and improvement in healthcare outcomes, the primary prevention of behavioral health problems in this delivery model has been relatively neglected. The present paper discusses the potential value of incorporating the prevention of behavioral health problems into the annual physical/wellness checkup and proposes a detailed system for how this might be accomplished. Limitations, future research, and costs associated with increased prevention in a primary care context are discussed.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
13
A qualitative study: Barriers and facilitators to health care access for individuals with psychiatric disabilities
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. Mesidor, V. Gidugu, E. S. Rogers, V. M. Kash-Macdonald, J. B. Boardman
Year: 2011
Source:
Mesidor M, Gidugu V, Rogers ES, Kash-Macdonald VM, Boardman JB. A qualitative study: Barriers and facilitators to health care access for individuals with psychiatric disabilities. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal 2011;34:285-294, . https://doi.org/10.2975/34.4.2011.285.294.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: This qualitative study was conducted as part of a larger randomized trial to examine barriers and facilitators to accessing and providing comprehensive primary health care for individuals with serious mental illnesses. We examined the perspectives of administrators and providers in a behavioral health organization surrounding the use of a nurse practitioner model of delivering primary healthcare. METHODS: Ten key informant interviews were conducted and analyzed using qualitative data analysis software. Concepts and themes regarding access to and delivery of primary healthcare were inductively derived from the data. RESULTS: Results confirmed significant issues related to chronic physical health problems among individuals with psychiatric disabilities and detailed a host of barriers to receiving health care as well as the perceived benefits of the nurse practitioner intervention. Financial challenges played a significant role in the organization's ability to make primary and mental health care integration a sustainable endeavor. In addition, staff faced increased burdens on their time due to adding a focus on physical health to their existing job duties. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: A nurse practitioner stationed in a behavioral healthcare setting is viewed by administrators and providers as extremely beneficial in addressing issues of access to comprehensive and integrated primary healthcare for individuals with severe psychiatric disabilities but sustaining such a model of care is not without organizational challenges.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
14
A randomised trial of the cost effectiveness of buprenorphine as an alternative to methadone maintenance treatment for heroin dependence in a primary care setting
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. H. Harris, E. Gospodarevskaya, A. J. Ritter
Year: 2005
Source:
Harris AH, Gospodarevskaya E, Ritter AJ. A randomised trial of the cost effectiveness of buprenorphine as an alternative to methadone maintenance treatment for heroin dependence in a primary care setting. Pharmacoeconomics 2005;23:77-91, .
Publication Place: New Zealand
Abstract: BACKGROUND AND AIM: Buprenorphine offers an alternative to methadone in the treatment of heroin dependence, and has the advantage of allowing alternate-day dosing. This study is the first to examine the cost effectiveness of buprenorphine as maintenance treatment for heroin dependence in a primary care setting using economic and clinical data collected within a randomised trial. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The study was a randomised, open-label, 12-month trial of 139 heroin-dependent patients in a community setting receiving individualised treatment regimens of buprenorphine or methadone. Those who were currently on a methadone program (n = 57; continuing therapy subgroup) were analysed separately from new treatment recipients (n = 82; initial therapy subgroup). The study took a broad societal perspective and included health, crime and personal costs. Data on resource use and outcomes were a combination of clinical records and self report at interview. The main outcomes were incremental cost per additional day free of heroin use and per QALY. An analysis of uncertainty calculated the likelihood of net benefits for a range of acceptable money values of outcomes. All costs were in 1999 Australian dollars (DollarA). RESULTS: The estimated mean number of heroin-free days did not differ significantly between those randomised to methadone (225 [95% CI 91, 266]), or buprenorphine (222 [95% CI 194, 250]) over the year of the trial. Buprenorphine was associated with an average 0.03 greater QALYs over 52 weeks (not significant). The total cost was DollarA 17,736 (95% CI -DollarA 2981, DollarA 38,364) with methadone and DollarA 11,916 (95% CI DollarA 7697, DollarA 16,135) with buprenorphine; costs excluding crime were DollarA 4513 (95% CI DollarA 3495, DollarA 5531) and DollarA 5651 (95% CI DollarA 4202, DollarA 7100). With additional heroin-free days as the outcome, and crime costs included buprenorphine has a lower cost but less heroin-free days. If crime costs are excluded buprenorphine has a higher cost and worse outcome than methadone. With additional QALYs as the outcome, the cost effectiveness of buprenorphine is DollarA 39,404 if crime is excluded, but buprenorphine is dominant if crime is included. CONCLUSIONS: The trial found no significant differences in costs or outcomes between methadone and buprenorphine maintenance in this particular setting. Although some of the results suggest that methadone may have a cost advantage, it is difficult to infer from the trial data that offering buprenorphine as an alternative would have a significant effect on total costs or outcomes. The point estimates of costs and outcomes suggest that buprenorphine may have an advantage in those initiating therapy. The confidence intervals were wide, however, and the likelihood of net benefits from substituting one treatment for another was close to 50%.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
15
A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of psychodynamic counselling for general practice patients with chronic depression
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. Simpson, R. Corney, P. Fitzgerald, J. Beecham
Year: 2003
Source:
Simpson S, Corney R, Fitzgerald P, Beecham J. A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of psychodynamic counselling for general practice patients with chronic depression. Psychological Medicine: A Journal Of Research In Psychiatry And The Allied Sciences 2003;33:229-239, . https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291702006517.
Publication Place: United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
16
A randomized trial of collaborative depression care in obstetrics and gynecology clinics: socioeconomic disadvantage and treatment response
Type: Journal Article
Authors: W. Katon, J. Russo, S. D. Reed, C. A. Croicu, E. Ludman, A. LaRocco, J. L. Melville
Year: 2015
Source:
Katon W, Russo J, Reed SD, Croicu CA, Ludman E, LaRocco A, et al. A randomized trial of collaborative depression care in obstetrics and gynecology clinics: socioeconomic disadvantage and treatment response. The American Journal Of Psychiatry 2015;172:32-40, . https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2014.14020258.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The authors evaluated whether an obstetrics-gynecology clinic-based collaborative depression care intervention is differentially effective compared with usual care for socially disadvantaged women with either no health insurance or with public coverage compared with those with commercial insurance. METHOD: The study was a two-site randomized controlled trial with an 18-month follow-up. Women were recruited who screened positive (a score of at least 10 on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9) and met criteria for major depression or dysthymia. The authors tested whether insurance status had a differential effect on continuous depression outcomes between the intervention and usual care over 18 months. They also assessed differences between the intervention and usual care in quality of depression care and dichotomous clinical outcomes (a decrease of at least 50% in depressive symptom severity and patient-rated improvement on the Patient Global Improvement Scale). RESULTS: The treatment effect was significantly associated with insurance status. Compared with patients with commercial insurance, those with no insurance or with public coverage had greater recovery from depression symptoms with collaborative care than with usual care over the 18-month follow-up period. At the 12-month follow-up, the effect size for depression improvement compared with usual care among women with no insurance or with public coverage was 0.81 (95% CI=0.41, 0.95), whereas it was 0.39 (95% CI=-0.08, 0.84) for women with commercial insurance. CONCLUSIONS: Collaborative depression care adapted to obstetrics-gynecology settings had a greater impact on depression outcomes for socially disadvantaged women with no insurance or with public coverage compared with women with commercial insurance.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
17
A randomized trial of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of observed versus unobserved administration of buprenorphine-naloxone for heroin dependence.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: James Bell, Marian Shanahan, Carolyn Mutch, Felicity Rea, Anni Ryan, Robert Batey, Adrian Dunlop, Adam Winstock
Year: 2007
Source:
Bell J, Shanahan M, Mutch C, Rea F, Ryan A, Batey R, et al. A randomized trial of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of observed versus unobserved administration of buprenorphine-naloxone for heroin dependence. Addiction 2007;102:1899-1907, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
18
A randomized trial of psychiatric consultation with distressed high utilizers
Type: Journal Article
Authors: W. Katon, M. Von Korff, E. Lin, T. Bush, J. Russo, P. Lipscomb, E. Wagner
Year: 1992
Source:
Katon W, Von Korff M, Lin E, Bush T, Russo J, Lipscomb P, et al. A randomized trial of psychiatric consultation with distressed high utilizers. Gen Hosp Psychiatry 1992;14:86-98, .
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
19
A Remote Collaborative Care Program for Patients with Depression Living in Rural Areas: Open-Label Trial
Type: Journal Article
Authors: G. Rojas, V. Guajardo, P. Martinez, A. Castro, R. Fritsch, M. Moessner, S. Bauer
Year: 2018
Source:
Rojas G, Guajardo V, Martinez P, Castro A, Fritsch R, Moessner M, et al. A Remote Collaborative Care Program for Patients with Depression Living in Rural Areas: Open-Label Trial. Journal Of Medical Internet Research 2018;20. https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.8803.
Publication Place: Canada
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
20
A research agenda for adolescent-centered primary care in the United States
Type: Journal Article
Authors: H. B. Fox, M. A. McManus, C. E. Irwin Jr, K. J. Kelleher, K. Peake
Year: 2013
Source:
Fox HB, McManus MA, Irwin CE, Kelleher KJ, Peake K. A research agenda for adolescent-centered primary care in the United States. The Journal Of Adolescent Health : Official Publication Of The Society For Adolescent Medicine 2013;53:307-310, . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.06.025.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection