Literature Collection

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Grey Literature

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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 6,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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1
"Conversational Advice": A mixed-methods analysis of medical residents' experiences co-managing primary care patients with behavioral health providers
Type: Journal Article
Authors: P. Hemming, R. B. Levine, J. J. Gallo
Year: 2018
Source:
Hemming P, Levine RB, Gallo JJ. "Conversational Advice": A mixed-methods analysis of medical residents' experiences co-managing primary care patients with behavioral health providers. Patient Education And Counseling 2018;101.
Publication Place: Ireland
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
2
"I'm not abusing or anything": Patient-physician communication about opioid treatment in chronic pain
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Marianne S. Matthias, Erin E. Krebs, Linda A. Collins, Alicia A. Bergman, Jessica Coffing, Matthew J. Bair
Year: 2013
Source:
Matthias MS, Krebs EE, Collins LA, Bergman AA, Coffing J, Bair MJ. "I'm not abusing or anything": Patient-physician communication about opioid treatment in chronic pain. Patient Education And Counseling 2013;93.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
3
"It goes beyond good camaraderie": A qualitative study of the process of becoming an interprofessional healthcare "teamlet"
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Molly Harrod, Lauren E. Weston, Claire Robinson, Adam Tremblay, Clinton L. Greenstone, Jane Forman
Year: 2016
Source:
Harrod M, Weston LE, Robinson C, Tremblay A, Greenstone CL, Forman J. "It goes beyond good camaraderie": A qualitative study of the process of becoming an interprofessional healthcare "teamlet". Journal Of Interprofessional Care 2016;30.
Publication Place: Abingdon
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
4
"Painting a picture of the client": implementing the Addiction Severity Index in community treatment programs
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. E. Spear, A. H. Brown, R. A. Rawson
Year: 2005
Source:
Spear SE, Brown AH, Rawson RA. "Painting a picture of the client": implementing the Addiction Severity Index in community treatment programs. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment 2005;29.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: This article discusses the implementation of the Drug Evaluation Network System (DENS) version of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) among substance abuse treatment providers in Los Angeles County. Thirty-two trained and certified treatment professionals from 14 programs participated in focus group interviews about their use of and experiences with the ASI. All 14 programs were currently administering the ASI at the time of the study. Qualitative interviews revealed variation among the programs in terms of when staff administered the ASI and how they used it in clinical care. Although the ASI creates a comprehensive picture of substance-abusing patients and their functioning, the timing of its administration seems to significantly affect the usefulness of the information. The findings illustrate the importance of practicality, flexibility, and ongoing training for the successful implementation of evidence-based practices.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
5
"Progress and Promise" Podcast Series
Type: Web Resource
Authors: National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education
Year: 2017
Source:
Education NC for IP and. "Progress and Promise" Podcast Series 2017.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Grey Literature See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

6
"That's why they call it practice".
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Colleen T. Fogarty, Larry B. Mauksch
Year: 2014
Source:
Fogarty CT, Mauksch LB. "That's why they call it practice". Families, Systems, & Health - Vol 32, Iss 4 2014.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
7
"When Grief Breaks Your Heart": A Case Study of Interpersonal Psychotherapy Delivered in a Primary Care Setting
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. F. Gomes, N. Chowdhary, E. Vousoura, H. Verdeli
Year: 2016
Source:
Gomes MF, Chowdhary N, Vousoura E, Verdeli H. "When Grief Breaks Your Heart": A Case Study of Interpersonal Psychotherapy Delivered in a Primary Care Setting. Journal Of Clinical Psychology 2016;72. https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.22362.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
8
188. Long-term Effects of Primary Care Provider Training in Screening, Assessment, and Treatment of Adolescent Depression
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Elise M. Fallucco, Carolina M. Bejarano, Chelsea B. Kozikowski, Ali Talwar, Tim Wysocki
Year: 2015
Source:
Fallucco EM, Bejarano CM, Kozikowski CB, Talwar A, Wysocki T. 188. Long-term Effects of Primary Care Provider Training in Screening, Assessment, and Treatment of Adolescent Depression. Journal Of Adolescent Health 2015;56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.10.193.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
9
2009 Clinical Guidelines from the American Pain Society and the American Academy of Pain Medicine on the use of chronic opioid therapy in chronic noncancer pain: what are the key messages for clinical practice?
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. Chou
Year: 2009
Source:
Chou R. 2009 Clinical Guidelines from the American Pain Society and the American Academy of Pain Medicine on the use of chronic opioid therapy in chronic noncancer pain: what are the key messages for clinical practice?. Polskie Archiwum Medycyny Wewnetrznej 2009;119:469-477, .
Publication Place: Poland
Abstract: Safe and effective chronic opioid therapy (COT) for chronic noncancer pain requires clinical skills and knowledge in both the principles of opioid prescribing and in the assessment and management of risks associated with opioid abuse, addiction, and diversion. The American Pain Society and the American Academy of Pain Medicine commissioned a systematic review of the evidence on COT for chronic noncancer pain and convened a multidisciplinary expert panel to review the evidence and formulate recommendations based on the best available evidence. This article summarizes key clinical messages from this guideline regarding patient selection and risk stratification, informed consent and opioid management plans, initiation and titration of COT, use of methadone, monitoring of patients, use of opioids in high-risk patients, assessment of aberrant drug-related behaviors, dose escalations and high-dose opioid therapy, opioid rotation, indications for discontinuation of therapy, prevention and management of opioid-related adverse effects, driving and work safety, identifying a medical home and when to obtain consultation, and management of breakthrough pain.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
10
2013 Update in addiction medicine for the generalist
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. J. Gordon, N. Bertholet, J. McNeely, J. L. Starrels, J. M. Tetrault, A . Y. Walley
Year: 2013
Source:
Gordon AJ, Bertholet N, McNeely J, Starrels JL, Tetrault JM, . Y. Walley A. 2013 Update in addiction medicine for the generalist. Addiction Science & Clinical Practice 2013;8:0640-8-18, 18+. https://doi.org/10.1186/1940-0640-8-18.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: Increasingly, patients with unhealthy alcohol and other drug use are being seen in primary care and other non-specialty addiction settings. Primary care providers are well positioned to screen, assess, and treat patients with alcohol and other drug use because this use, and substance use disorders, may contribute to a host of medical and mental health harms. We sought to identify and examine important recent advances in addiction medicine in the medical literature that have implications for the care of patients in primary care or other generalist settings. To accomplish this aim, we selected articles in the field of addiction medicine, critically appraised and summarized the manuscripts, and highlighted their implications for generalist practice. During an initial review, we identified articles through an electronic Medline search (limited to human studies and in English) using search terms for alcohol and other drugs of abuse published from January 2010 to January 2012. After this initial review, we searched for other literature in web-based or journal resources for potential articles of interest. From the list of articles identified in these initial reviews, each of the six authors independently selected articles for more intensive review and identified the ones they found to have a potential impact on generalist practice. The identified articles were then ranked by the number of authors who selected each article. Through a consensus process over 4 meetings, the authors reached agreement on the articles with implications for practice for generalist clinicians that warranted inclusion for discussion. The authors then grouped the articles into five categories: 1) screening and brief interventions in outpatient settings, 2) identification and management of substance use among inpatients, 3) medical complications of substance use, 4) use of pharmacotherapy for addiction treatment in primary care and its complications, and 5) integration of addiction treatment and medical care. The authors discuss each selected articles' merits, limitations, conclusions, and implication to advancing addiction screening, assessment, and treatment of addiction in generalist physician practice environments.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
11
2016 Systems of Care Special Program: Meeting the Needs of Children and Youth with Complex Behavioral Health Problems in an Integrated Healthcare World
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Justine Larson, Mark Chenven, Gregory K. Fritz, Paige Pierce, Gary Blau, Ruth Stein, Robert J. Hill, Lisa R. Fortuna, Joyce N. Harrison, Kaye L. McGinty, Lisa Amaya-Jackson, Richard Martini, Terry G. Lee, William Arroyo, Sheryl H. Kataoka
Year: 2016
Source:
Larson J, Chenven M, Fritz GK, Pierce P, Blau G, Stein R, et al. 2016 Systems of Care Special Program: Meeting the Needs of Children and Youth with Complex Behavioral Health Problems in an Integrated Healthcare World. Journal Of The American Academy Of Child And Adolescent Psychiatry 2016;55.
Publication Place: Baltimore
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
12
2021 State of Mental Health in America
Type: Report
Authors: Mental Health America
Year: 2020
Source:
America MH. 2021 State of Mental Health in America. 2020.
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

13
6 Steps to Creating a Culture of Persons and Family Engagement in Health Care
Type: Report
Authors: PCPCC Support and Alignment Network
Year: 2017
Source:
Network PCPCCS and A. 6 Steps to Creating a Culture of Persons and Family Engagement in Health Care. Washington, Dc: Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative; 2017.
Publication Place: Washington, DC
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

14
A "middle way": Introducing a flexible year-long program to prepare for certification in addiction medicine
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Petros Levounis, Erin Zerbo, Rashi Aggarwal
Year: 2016
Source:
Levounis P, Zerbo E, Aggarwal R. A "middle way": Introducing a flexible year-long program to prepare for certification in addiction medicine. Academic Psychiatry 2016;40.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
15
A buprenorphine education and training program for primary care residents: Implementation and evaluation
Type: Journal Article
Authors: H. V. Kunins, N. L. Sohler, A. Giovanniello, D. Thompson, C. O. Cunningham
Year: 2013
Source:
Kunins HV, Sohler NL, Giovanniello A, Thompson D, Cunningham CO. A buprenorphine education and training program for primary care residents: Implementation and evaluation. Substance Abuse 2013;34:242-247, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2012.752777.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Although substance use disorders are highly prevalent, resident preparation to care for patients with these disorders is frequently insufficient. With increasing rates of opioid abuse and dependence, and the availability of medication-assisted treatment, one strategy to improve resident skills is to incorporate buprenorphine treatment into training settings. METHODS: In this study, esidency faculty delivered the BupEd education and training program to 71 primary care residents. BupEd included (1) a didactic session on buprenorphine, (2) an interactive motivational interviewing session, (3) monthly case conferences, and (4) supervised clinical experience providing buprenorphine treatment. To evaluate BupEd, the authors assessed (1) residents' provision of buprenorphine treatment during residency, (2) residents' provision of buprenorphine treatment after residency, and (3) treatment retention among patients treated by resident versus attending physicians. RESULTS: Of 71 residents, most served as a covering or primary provider to at least 1 buprenorphine-treated patient (84.5 and 66.2%, respectively). Of 40 graduates, 27.5% obtained a buprenorphine waiver and 17.5% prescribed buprenorphine. Treatment retention was similar between patients cared for by resident PCPs versus attending PCPs (90-day retention: 63.6% [n = 35] vs. 67.9% [n = 152]; P = .55). CONCLUSION: These results show that BupEd is feasible, provides residents with supervised clinical experience in treating opioid-dependent patients, and can serve as a model to prepare primary care physicians to care for patients with opioid dependence.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
16
A care management model for enhancing physician practice for Alzheimer Disease in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Mary Guerriero Austrom, Cora Hartwell, Patricia S. Moore, Malaz Boustani, Hugh C. Hendrie, Christopher M. Callahan
Year: 2005
Source:
Austrom MG, Hartwell C, Moore PS, Boustani M, Hendrie HC, Callahan CM. A care management model for enhancing physician practice for Alzheimer Disease in primary care. Clinical Gerontologist: The Journal Of Aging And Mental Health 2005;29:35-43, . https://doi.org/10.1300/J018v29n02_05.
Publication Place: US: Haworth Press
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
17
A case report: Implementing a nurse telecare program for treating depression in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. F. Meresman, E. M. Hunkeler, W. A. Hargreaves, A. J. Kirsch, P. Robinson, A. Green, E. Z. Mann, M. Getzell, P. Feigenbaum
Year: 2003
Source:
Meresman JF, Hunkeler EM, Hargreaves WA, Kirsch AJ, Robinson P, Green A, et al. A case report: Implementing a nurse telecare program for treating depression in primary care. The Psychiatric Quarterly 2003;74:61-73, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: The treatment of depression in primary care needs improvement. Previously, we reported that a nurse telecare intervention for treating depression in primary care clinics significantly improved treatment outcomes. The usefulness of nurse telecare, however, depends upon the feasibility of dissemination. In this report we describe nurse telecare and the steps required for implementation, and describe its dissemination in various settings. In addition to medication, which is managed by a primary care physician, the key elements of nurse telecare are focused behavioral activation, emotional support, patient education, promotion of treatment adherence, and monitoring of progress, delivered in ten brief telephone appointments over four months by primary care nurses. Support from key administrators and clinical champions is crucial to success. Nurses need "dedicated" scheduled time for telecare activities. Nurse telecare has been piloted and disseminated in diverse settings. The model required only small modifications for dissemination, and was implemented with minimal investment of resources and no negative impact on clinic operations.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
18
A chronic opioid therapy dose reduction policy in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. B. Weimer, D. M. Hartung, S. Ahmed, C. Nicolaidis
Year: 2016
Source:
Weimer MB, Hartung DM, Ahmed S, Nicolaidis C. A chronic opioid therapy dose reduction policy in primary care. Substance Abuse 2016;37:141-147, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2015.1129526.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: High-dose opioids prescribed for the treatment of chronic pain have been associated with increased risk of opioid overdose. Health systems and states have responded by developing opioid dose limitation policies. Little is known about how these policies affect prescribing practices or characteristics of patients who respond best to opioid tapers from high-dose opioids. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate change in total opioid dose after the implementation of a provider education intervention and a 120 mg morphine equivalents per day (MED) opioid dose limitation policy in one academic primary care clinic. We compared opioid prescriptions 1 year before and 1 year after the intervention. We used univariate and multivariate logistic regression to assess which patient characteristics predicted opioid dose reduction from high opioid dose. RESULTS: Out of a total of 516 patients prescribed chronic opioid therapy, 116 patients (22%) were prescribed high-dose opioid therapy (>120 mg MED). After policy adoption, the average daily dose of opioids declined by 64 mg MED (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-96; P < .001) and 41 patients (37%) on high-dose opioids tapered their doses below 120 mg MED (Tapered to Safer Dose group). In multivariate analyses, female sex was the only significant association with dose taper; female patients were less likely to taper to a safer dose (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.28, 95% CI: 0.11-0.70). CONCLUSIONS: A combined intervention of education and a practice policy that limits opioid doses for patients prescribed chronic opioid therapy may be an important component of system-level strategies to reduce opioid misuse and overdose; it may also help identify patients suitable for medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder. Specific strategies may be needed to assist women with opioid dose tapers.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
19
A Clinical Care Algorithmic Toolkit for Promoting Screening and Next-Level Assessment of Pediatric Depression and Anxiety in Primary Care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. Honigfeld, S. J. Macary, D. J. Grasso
Year: 2017
Source:
Honigfeld L, Macary SJ, Grasso DJ. A Clinical Care Algorithmic Toolkit for Promoting Screening and Next-Level Assessment of Pediatric Depression and Anxiety in Primary Care. Journal Of Pediatric Health Care : Official Publication Of National Association Of Pediatric Nurse Associates & Practitioners 2017;31:e15-e23, .
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
20
A clinically integrated curriculum in evidence-based medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: The EU-EBM project
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. F. Coppus, J. I. Emparanza, J. Hadley, R. Kulier, S. Weinbrenner, T. N. Arvanitis, A. Burls, J. B. Cabello, T. Decsi, A. R. Horvath, M. Kaczor, G. Zanrei, K. Pierer, K. Stawiarz, R. Kunz, B. W. Mol, K. S. Khan
Year: 2007
Source:
Coppus SF, Emparanza JI, Hadley J, Kulier R, Weinbrenner S, Arvanitis TN, et al. A clinically integrated curriculum in evidence-based medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: The EU-EBM project. Bmc Medical Education 2007;7:46+. https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6920-7-46.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Over the last years key stake holders in the healthcare sector have increasingly recognised evidence based medicine (EBM) as a means to improving the quality of healthcare. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the best way to disseminate basic knowledge of EBM. As a result, huge variation in EBM educational provision, setting, duration, intensity, content, and teaching methodology exists across Europe and worldwide. Most courses for health care professionals are delivered outside the work context ('stand alone') and lack adaptation to the specific needs for EBM at the learners' workplace. Courses with modern 'adaptive' EBM teaching that employ principles of effective continuing education might fill that gap. We aimed to develop a course for post-graduate education which is clinically integrated and allows maximum flexibility for teachers and learners. METHODS: A group of experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions from eight European countries participated. We used an established methodology of curriculum development to design a clinically integrated EBM course with substantial components of e-learning. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. RESULTS: We defined explicit learning objectives about knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour for the five steps of EBM. A handbook guides facilitator and learner through five modules with clinical and e-learning components. Focussed activities and targeted assignments round off the learning process, after which each module is formally assessed. CONCLUSION: The course is learner-centred, problem-based, integrated with activities in the workplace and flexible. When successfully implemented, the course is designed to provide just-in-time learning through on-the-job-training, with the potential for teaching and learning to directly impact on practice.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection