Literature Collection

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Grey Literature

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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 8,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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8201
Understanding opioids and addiction
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. McCaffery, B. R. Ferrell
Year: 1994
Source:
McCaffery M, Ferrell BR. Understanding opioids and addiction. Nursing 1994;24:56-59, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
8202
Understanding opportunities and challenges with telemedicine-delivered buprenorphine during the COVID-19 pandemic
Type: Journal Article
Authors: K. M. Mattocks, D. T. Moore, D. L. Wischik, C. M. Lazar, M. I. Rosen
Year: 2022
Source:
Mattocks KM, Moore DT, Wischik DL, Lazar CM, Rosen MI. Understanding opportunities and challenges with telemedicine-delivered buprenorphine during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment 2022:108777+. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2022.108777.
Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a debilitating illness that remains a serious public health issue in the United States. Use of telemedicine to deliver medications for the treatment of OUD (MOUD) was limited until the confluence of the COVID-19 and opioid addiction epidemics in spring 2020. Starting in spring 2020, the Department of Veterans Health Affairs (VHA) transitioned from in-person to mostly telemedicine-delivered OUD care to reduce COVID-19 transmission among veterans and providers. To gain a nuanced understanding of provider perspectives on MOUD care delivery using telemedicine, we conducted semi-structured interviews with VHA providers who were using telehealth to deliver MOUD care. METHODS: We conducted semi-structed Zoom interviews with VA clinicians at nine VA Medical Centers (VAMCs) in eight states. Potential study participants were identified as providers who were involved in referrals and provision of buprenorphine treatment for chronic pain and opioid addiction. Audio-recordings of all interviews were transcribed and entered into Atlas. Ti qualitative analysis software. The study team analyzed the transcripts for major themes related to tele-prescribing practices for buprenorphine. RESULTS: Twenty-three VA providers participated in the study, representing 32% of all providers invited to participate in the study. The research team identified the following four themes: (1) COVID-19 spurred a seismic shift in OUD treatment; (2) Video calls provided a rare window into veterans' lives; (3) Providers experienced numerous challenges to virtual visits; and (4) Providers wrestled with paternalism and trust. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic accelerated the movement toward harm reduction approaches. Prior to the pandemic, stringent requirements existed for patients receiving MOUD care. Providers in this study reflected on the need for these requirements (e.g., in-person visits, toxicology screens) and how reducing this monitoring implied more trust in patients' autonomous decisions. Providers' observation that videoconferencing offered them a window into patients' lives may offer some ways to improve rapport, and research should explore how best to incorporate the additional information conveyed in virtual visits.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
8203
Understanding persons with psychological distress in primary health care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Tina Arvidsdotter, Bertil Marklund, Sven Kylen, Charles Taft, Inger Ekman
Year: 2016
Source:
Arvidsdotter T, Marklund B, Kylen S, Taft C, Ekman I. Understanding persons with psychological distress in primary health care. Scandinavian Journal Of Caring Sciences 2016;30:687-694, .
Topic(s):
General Literature See topic collection
8204
Understanding Primary and Behavioral Healthcare Integration
Type: Web Resource
Authors: L. Alexander, K. Wilson
Year: 2010
Source:
Alexander L, Wilson K. Understanding Primary and Behavioral Healthcare Integration 2010.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Grey Literature See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

8205
Understanding Primary Care Behavioral Health Across Military Settings: A Preliminary Comparison Between Deployed and In-Garrison Care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. R. Landoll, M. K. Nielsen, K. K. Waggoner
Year: 2017
Source:
Landoll RR, Nielsen MK, Waggoner KK. Understanding Primary Care Behavioral Health Across Military Settings: A Preliminary Comparison Between Deployed and In-Garrison Care. Military Medicine 2017;182:e1575-e1579, . https://doi.org/10.7205/MILMED-D-16-00272.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
8206
Understanding primary care physicians' propensity to assess elderly patients for depression using interaction and survey data
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. Tai-Seale, R. Bramson, D. Drukker, M. L. Hurwicz, M. Ory, T. Tai-Seale, R. Street, M. A. Cook
Year: 2005
Source:
Tai-Seale M, Bramson R, Drukker D, Hurwicz ML, Ory M, Tai-Seale T, et al. Understanding primary care physicians' propensity to assess elderly patients for depression using interaction and survey data. Medical Care 2005;43:1217-1224, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine primary care physicians' propensity to assess their elderly patients for depression using data from videotapes and patient and physician surveys. STUDY DESIGN: An observational study was informed by surveys of 389 patients and 33 physicians, and 389 videotapes of their clinical interactions. Secondary quantitative analyses used video data scored by the Assessment of Doctor-Elderly Patient Transactions system regarding depression assessment. A random-effects logit model was used to analyze the effects of patient health, competing demands, and racial and gender concordance on physicians' propensity to assess elderly patients for depression. RESULTS: Physicians assessed depression in only 14% of the visits. The use of formal depression assessment tools occurred only 3 times. White patients were almost 7 times more likely than nonwhite patients to be assessed for depression (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; P < 0.01). Depression assessment was less likely if the patient functioned better emotionally (OR, 0.95; P < 0.01). The propensity of depression assessment was higher in visits that covered multiple topics (OR, 1.3; P < 0.01) contrary to the notion of competing demands crowding out mental health services. Unexpectedly, depression assessment was less likely to occur in gender and racially concordant patient-physician dyads. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care physicians assessed their elderly patients for depression infrequently. Reducing the number of topics covered in visits and matching patients and physicians based on race and gender may be counterproductive to depression detection. Informed by videotapes and surveys, our findings offer new insights on the actual care process and present conclusions that are different from studies based on administrative or survey data alone.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
8207
Understanding Supporting and Hindering Factors in Community-Based Psychotherapy for Refugees: A Realist-Informed Systematic Review
Type: Journal Article
Authors: D. Gruner, O. Magwood, L. Bair, L. Duff, S. Adel, K. Pottie
Year: 2020
Source:
Gruner D, Magwood O, Bair L, Duff L, Adel S, Pottie K. Understanding Supporting and Hindering Factors in Community-Based Psychotherapy for Refugees: A Realist-Informed Systematic Review. International Journal Of Environmental Research And Public Health 2020;17:4618+. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134618.
Abstract:

Culture, tradition, structural violence, and mental health-related stigma play a major role in global mental health for refugees. Our aim was to understand what factors determine the success or failure of community-based psychotherapy for trauma-affected refugees and discuss implications for primary health care programs. Using a systematic realist-informed approach, we searched five databases from 2000 to 2018. Two reviewers independently selected RCTs for inclusion, and we contacted authors to obtain therapy training manuals. Fifteen articles and 11 training manuals met our inclusion criteria. Factors that improved symptoms of depression, anxiety, and PTSD included providing culturally adapted care in a migrant-sensitive setting, giving a role to other clinical staff (task-shifting), and intervention intensity. Precarious asylum status, constraining program monitoring requirements, and diverse socio-cultural and gender needs within a setting may reduce the effectiveness of the program. Primary care programs may enable community based mental health care and may reduce mental health-related stigma for refugees and other migrants. More research is needed on the cultural constructs of distress, programs delivered in primary care, and the role of cultural and language interpretation services in mental health care.

Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
8208
Understanding the behavioral healthcare crisis: The promise of integrated care and diagnostic reform
Type: Book
Authors: Nicholas A. Cummings, William T. O'Donohue
Year: 2011
Source:
Cummings NA, O'Donohue WT. Understanding the behavioral healthcare crisis: The promise of integrated care and diagnostic reform. New York: Routledge; 2011.
Publication Place: New York
Abstract: Where we are, how we got there, and where we need to go: the promise of integrated care / Nicholas A. Cummings and William T. O'Donohue -- Our 50-minute hour in the nanosecond era. The need for a third "e" in behavioral healthcare: efficiency / Nicholas A. Cummings -- The financial dimension of integrated behavioral/primary care / Nicholas A. Cummings, William T. O'Donohue, and Janet L. Cummings -- Mental health informatics / Bruce Lubotsky Levin and Ardis Hanson -- E-health and telehealth / Anthony Papa and Crissa Draper -- Can prescribing psychologists assist in providing more cost-effective, quality mental healthcare? / Morgan T. Sammons -- Diagnostic system innovations / Thomas A. Widiger -- Evidence-based treatment / E. David Klonsky -- The quality improvement agenda in behavioral healthcare reform: using science to reduce error / William O'Donohue, Rachel Ammirati, and Scott O. Lilienfeld -- The behavioral health medical home / Dennis Freeman -- Reforms in professional education / Ronald R. O'Donnell -- Pay for performance and other innovations in reimbursement for behavioral care services / Nicholas A. Cummings and Janet L. Cummings -- Trends in behavioral healthcare for an aging America / Christina Garrison-Diehn ... [et al.] -- Failure to serve: the use of medications as a first-line treatment and misuse in behavioral interventions / John L. Caccavale with the collaboration of Joseph Casciani ... [et al.] -- Reforms in treating children and families / James H. Bray -- Reforms for ethnic minorities and women / Lorraine Benuto and Brian D. Leany -- Wellness and prevention: key elements in the next generation of behavioral health service delivery systems / Monica E. Oss -- Reforms in veteran and military behavioral health / R. Blake Chaffee -- Biofeedback / James Lawrence Thomas.; "The Promise of Integrated Healthcare is a necessary book, edited and contributed to by a great variety of authors from academia, government, and industry. The book takes a bold look at what reforms are needed in healthcare and provides reforms and specific recommendations. Some of the serious concerns about the healthcare system that Cummings, O'Donohue, and contributors address include access problems, safety problems, costs problems, the uninsured, and problems with efficacy. When students, practitioners, researchers, and policy makers finish reading this book they will have not just a greater idea of what problems still exist in healthcare, but, more importantly, a clearer idea of how to tackle them and provide much-needed reform"--
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

8209
Understanding the dynamics of sustainable change: A 20-year case study of integrated health and social care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: C. Klinga, H. Hasson, Andreen Sachs, J. Hansson
Year: 2018
Source:
Klinga C, Hasson H, Sachs A, Hansson J. Understanding the dynamics of sustainable change: A 20-year case study of integrated health and social care. Bmc Health Services Research 2018;18:400+. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-3061-6.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Change initiatives face many challenges, and only a few lead to long-term sustainability. One area in which the challenge of achieving long-term sustainability is particularly noticeable is integrated health and social care. Service integration is crucial for a wide range of patients including people with complex mental health and social care needs. However, previous research has focused on the initiation, resistance and implementation of change, while longitudinal studies remain sparse. The objective of this study was therefore to gain insight into the dynamics of sustainable changes in integrated health and social care through an analysis of local actions that were triggered by a national policy. METHODS: A retrospective and qualitative case-study research design was used, and data from the model organisation's steering-committee minutes covering 1995-2015 were gathered and analysed. The analysis generated a narrative case description, which was mirrored to the key elements of the Dynamic Sustainability Framework (DSF). RESULTS: The development of inter-sectoral cooperation was characterized by a participatory approach in which a shared structure was created to support cooperation and on-going quality improvement and learning based on the needs of the service user. A key management principle was cooperation, not only on all organisational levels, but also with service users, stakeholder associations and other partner organisations. It was shown that all these parts were interrelated and collectively contributed to the creation of a structure and a culture which supported the development of a dynamic sustainable health and social care. CONCLUSION: This study provides valuable insights into the dynamics of organizational sustainability and understanding of key managerial actions taken to establish, develop and support integration of health and social care for people with complex mental health needs. The service user involvement and regular reviews of service users' needs were essential in order to tailor services to the needs. Another major finding was the importance of continuously adapting the content of the change to suit its context. Hence, continuous refinement of the change content was found to be more important than designing the change at the pre-implementation stage.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
8210
Understanding the scope and practice of behavioral medicine in family medicine
Type: Journal Article
Authors: O. Oyama, S. G. Kosch, M. A. Burg, T. E. Spruill
Year: 2009
Source:
Oyama O, Kosch SG, Burg MA, Spruill TE. Understanding the scope and practice of behavioral medicine in family medicine. Family Medicine 2009;41:578-584, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Family medicine integrates psychosocial factors (behavioral, psychological, cognitive, social, and cultural) into the comprehensive medical care of patients. Behavioral medicine is the discipline representing the contribution of the behavioral sciences to medicine and encompasses a broad field of knowledge and practice. This research explores the understanding of the scope and practice of behavioral medicine among academic family physicians. METHODS: Surveys were administered to physicians at nine family medicine residency programs in Florida. RESULTS: Study participants reported being trained in and using behavioral medicine techniques and consultants with patients. Behavioral medicine was valued as a collection of techniques for the prevention and treatment of physical and psychiatric illness. Physicians emphasized the utility of behavioral specialists' skills in conditions with strong psychological components compared to other chronic medical conditions. Behavioral medicine techniques were associated with traditional psychotherapeutic interventions and often provided by nonpsychiatric physicians. Many physicians categorized behavioral medicine as a type of complementary and alternative medicine. CONCLUSIONS: Behavioral medicine is valued but not strongly identified as a distinct discipline, which might affect its use. This may explain why behavioral medicine skills were differentially valued for the prevention and treatment of psychiatric illness compared to medical illness.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
8211
Understanding the service needs of youth with opioid use: A descriptive study of demographics and co-occurring substance use and mental health concerns
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Irina Sverdlichenko, Lisa D. Hawke, Joanna Henderson
Year: 2021
Source:
Sverdlichenko I, Hawke LD, Henderson J. Understanding the service needs of youth with opioid use: A descriptive study of demographics and co-occurring substance use and mental health concerns. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment 2021. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2021.108592.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
8212
Understanding the use of diverted buprenorphine
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. J. Cicero, M. S. Ellis, H. D. Chilcoat
Year: 2018
Source:
Cicero TJ, Ellis MS, Chilcoat HD. Understanding the use of diverted buprenorphine. Drug And Alcohol Dependence 2018;193:117-123, .
Publication Place: Ireland
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
8213
Underused Weapon In the War on Addiction
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. Kelley
Year: 2018
Source:
Kelley T. Underused Weapon In the War on Addiction. Managed Care (Langhorne, Pa.) 2018;27:15-17, .
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
8214
Underutilization of the current clinical capacity to provide buprenorphine treatment for opioid use disorders within the Veterans Health Administration
Type: Journal Article
Authors: H. Valenstein-Mah, H. Hagedorn, C. L. Kay, M. L. Christopher, A. J. Gordon
Year: 2018
Source:
Valenstein-Mah H, Hagedorn H, Kay CL, Christopher ML, Gordon AJ. Underutilization of the current clinical capacity to provide buprenorphine treatment for opioid use disorders within the Veterans Health Administration. Substance Abuse 2018;39:286-288, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2018.1509251.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a critical concern among US veterans. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) recommends buprenorphine as a first-line treatment for OUD; however, only 35% of veterans with an OUD currently receive medication treatment. Practical barriers, including the capacity of providers to prescribe, may affect delivery of buprenorphine. We examined the current state of buprenorphine treatment within the VHA. METHODS: National VHA administrative databases were queried to identify all providers credentialed to prescribe buprenorphine as of January 2018. Data were extracted on providers' prescribing capacity (30, 100, or 275 patients concurrently) and number of patients who received buprenorphine in the prior 180 days. RESULTS: A total of 1458 VHA providers were credentialed to prescribe buprenorphine. Forty-three percent of providers had not prescribed buprenorphine to any VHA patients in the past 180 days. Of those that prescribed to at least 1 patient, providers still prescribed to fewer patients than their capacity, regardless of their patient panel size (30, 100, or 275), prescribing to 18.5 patients on average. CONCLUSIONS: VHA providers are prescribing buprenorphine below their capacity. A multipronged approach to increase the number of credentialed providers and address barriers to prescribing is needed to ensure that veterans get effective treatment for OUD.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
8215
Unemployment and emergency room visits predict poor treatment outcome in primary care panic disorder
Type: Journal Article
Authors: P. Roy-Byrne, J. Russo, D. S. Cowley, W. J. Katon
Year: 2003
Source:
Roy-Byrne P, Russo J, Cowley DS, Katon WJ. Unemployment and emergency room visits predict poor treatment outcome in primary care panic disorder. J Clin Psychiatry 2003;64:383-389, .
Topic(s):
General Literature See topic collection
8216
Unhealthy drug use: how to screen, when to intervene
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. Zgierska, I. P. Amaza, R. L. Brown, M. Mundt, M. F. Fleming
Year: 2014
Source:
Zgierska A, Amaza IP, Brown RL, Mundt M, Fleming MF. Unhealthy drug use: how to screen, when to intervene. The Journal Of Family Practice 2014;63:524-530, .
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
8217
Unintended pregnancy in opioid-abusing women
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Sarah H. Heil, Hendree E. Jones, Amelia Arria, Karol Kaltenbach, Mara Coyle, Gabriele Fischer, Susan Stine, Peter Selby, Peter R. Martin
Year: 2011
Source:
Heil SH, Jones HE, Arria A, Kaltenbach K, Coyle M, Fischer G, et al. Unintended pregnancy in opioid-abusing women. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment 2011;40:199-202, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
8218
Unintentional drug overdose: Is more frequent use of non-prescribed buprenorphine associated with lower risk of overdose?
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. G. Carlson, R. Daniulaityte, S. M. Silverstein, R. W. Nahhas, S. S. Martins
Year: 2020
Source:
Carlson RG, Daniulaityte R, Silverstein SM, Nahhas RW, Martins SS. Unintentional drug overdose: Is more frequent use of non-prescribed buprenorphine associated with lower risk of overdose?. The International Journal On Drug Policy 2020;79:102722+. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2020.102722.
Publication Place: Netherlands
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
8219
United States For Non-Dependence: An Analysis of the Impact of Opioid Overprescribing in America
Type: Report
Authors: Inc Pacira Pharmaceuticals
Year: 2017
Source:
Pharmaceuticals IP. United States For Non-Dependence: An Analysis of the Impact of Opioid Overprescribing in America. Parsippany, Nj: Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; 2017.
Publication Place: Parsippany, NJ
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy�s Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

8220
Universal Depression Screening to Improve Depression Outcomes in Primary Care: Sounds Good, But Where Is the Evidence?
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. Mojtabai
Year: 2017
Source:
Mojtabai R. Universal Depression Screening to Improve Depression Outcomes in Primary Care: Sounds Good, But Where Is the Evidence?. Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.c.) 2017. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201600320.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: The 2016 recommendation statement by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) endorsed screening for depression in the general adult population. The recommendation was mainly based on studies that compared enhanced depression care that included depression screening with usual care. In contrast to the USPSTF recommendation, the 2013 guidelines from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC) recommended against routine depression screening. The CTFPHC could not identify any studies comparing depression outcomes of usual care with and without the addition of routine depression screening. In the absence of evidence of clinical benefit, there are concerns that wide adoption of the USPSTF recommendation for universal depression screening would lead to overdiagnosis of depression and an increase in inappropriate prescription of antidepressant medications.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Policy See topic collection