Literature Collection

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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 6,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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81
A comparison of various risk screening methods in predicting discharge from opioid treatment
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. Jones, T. Moore, J. L. Levy, S. Daffron, J. H. Browder, L. Allen, S. D. Passik
Year: 2012
Source:
Jones T, Moore T, Levy JL, Daffron S, Browder JH, Allen L, et al. A comparison of various risk screening methods in predicting discharge from opioid treatment. The Clinical Journal Of Pain 2012;28:93-100, . https://doi.org/10.1097/AJP.0b013e318225da9e.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: Risk assessment and stratification has become an important aspect of the prescribing of opioids to patients with chronic pain. There is little empirical data available on the sensitivity and specificity of commonly used risk assessment tools. This paper describes 2 studies that compare the prediction capabilities of various risk assessment tools. METHODS: The first study presents data on patients at a pain practice whose treatment with opioids was stopped due to their engaging in aberrant drug-related behavior. Patients were assessed with the Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain-Revised (SOAPP-R), the Pain Medication Questionnaire, the Opioid Risk Tool, and a clinical interview. A second study compared the risk assessment measures, SOAPP-R, Pain Medication Questionnaire, Opioid Risk Tool, and a clinical interview. Data were gathered on whether patients had engaged in aberrant drug-related behavior at 6-month follow-up. RESULTS: Significant differences in the measures were found. Accuracy did not appear to be a function of the type of aberrant drug-related behavior that the patient engaged in for any of the measures. The clinical interview showed the best sensitivity of the 4 risk measures in predicting risk. The SOAPP-R showed the best sensitivity of the self-report measures. However, the SOAPP-R appears to overrate risk. DISCUSSION: Overall, these studies indicate that not all risk assessment tools are equal in their ability to accurately predict future aberrant drug-related behavior. It may be that written risk assessment tools that use more subtle items are better suited to certain patient populations.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
82
A comprehensive review of a cross-disciplinary, case-based peer supervision model
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Michael Thomasgard, Vincent Collins
Year: 2003
Source:
Thomasgard M, Collins V. A comprehensive review of a cross-disciplinary, case-based peer supervision model. Families 2003;21:305-319, . https://doi.org/10.1037/1091-7527.21.3.305.
Publication Place: Inc.; Systems, & Health
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
83
A computer-assisted depression intervention in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: W. Levin, D. R. Campbell, K. B. McGovern, J. M. Gau, D. B. Kosty, J. R. Seeley, P. M. Lewinsohn
Year: 2011
Source:
Levin W, Campbell DR, McGovern KB, Gau JM, Kosty DB, Seeley JR, et al. A computer-assisted depression intervention in primary care. Psychological Medicine 2011;41:1373-1383, . https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291710001935.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: The clinical benefit for depression of an interactive computer-assisted cognitive-behavioral program on CD-ROM, the Wellness Workshop (WW), was evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. METHOD: A total of 191 individuals referred by primary-care physicians were randomly assigned to a control group, where physician-directed treatment as usual (TAU) was provided, or to a treatment group, where TAU was supplemented with the WW CD-ROM, delivered by mail (WW+TAU). Data were collected at baseline, at 6 weeks' post-intervention, and at a 6-month follow-up assessment. Participants were given a strong incentive by a reimbursement of $75 for completion of each assessment. Measures included symptom ratings obtained via structured clinical diagnostic interviews, as well as a battery of self-report questionnaires on symptoms specifically targeted by the intervention. RESULTS: Analysis of results demonstrated evidence for skill acquisition for improving dysfunctional thinking and reducing anxiety. Among those who met diagnostic criteria for depression, WW+TAU participants were three times more likely to remit at 6 weeks' post-test than TAU participants. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence supports the conclusion that the WW intervention added benefit to traditional care for depression. No placebo comparison group was included and the WW+TAU participants received slightly more attention (a supportive telephone contact, </= 5 min from a psychologist 2 weeks after receiving the program). Overall, the findings add support to the accumulating evidence for the potential clinical benefit of computer-assisted behavioral health interventions.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
84
A conceptual framework for interprofessional and co-managed care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. M. Retchin
Year: 2008
Source:
Retchin SM. A conceptual framework for interprofessional and co-managed care. Academic Medicine : Journal Of The Association Of American Medical Colleges 2008;83:929-933, . https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181850b4b.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Interprofessional care has been promoted by some policy makers and health professionals as a response to rising health care costs and threats to patient safety. Proponents suggest that interprofessional models of care can reduce fragmentation and lower costs through improved coordination between different health professionals. These models encourage the collaboration of supplementary skills between different health care professionals. Effective collaborative models of interprofessional care may be influenced by several variables germane to the interaction and structure of the team of health professionals--temporality, urgency, and degree of structured authority--and the author examines the importance of each variable in delivering interprofessional care. Co-managed models of care have also been proposed. Recent state health reform efforts have catalyzed the adoption of co-managed care models by expanding the autonomy of alternative providers through the broadening of scope of practice. These scope-of-practice changes are intended to permit greater diagnostic and therapeutic authority of nonphysician providers. This effort seems aimed at enhancing the competition between provider groups in the market and expanding consumer choices. Herein, the author presents a conceptual framework to describe different models of interprofessional and co-managed care. The author also considers interprofessional and co-managed care models in the context of the health reform movement. Some of the challenges are considered, as policy makers consider the options for facilitating further development of interprofessional models of practice and the implications for curricular modifications at academic health centers.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
85
A Consensus Operational Definition of Palliative Care In Action
Type: Report
Authors: C. J. Peek, ICSI Palliative Care Steering Committee
Year: 2012
Source:
Peek CJ, Committee ICSIPCS. A Consensus Operational Definition of Palliative Care In Action. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI); University of Minnesota; 2012.
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

86
A Consensus Operational Definition of Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH): Also known as Health Care Home
Type: Report
Authors: C. J. Peek, G. Oftedahl
Year: 2010
Source:
Peek CJ, Oftedahl G. A Consensus Operational Definition of Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH): Also known as Health Care Home. Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI); 2010.
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
,
Grey Literature See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

87
A contemporary protocol to assist primary care physicians in the treatment of panic and generalized anxiety disorders
Type: Journal Article
Authors: B. L. Rollman, Herbeck Belnap, C. F. Reynolds, H. C. Schulberg, M. K. Shear
Year: 2003
Source:
Rollman BL, Belnap H, Reynolds CF, Schulberg HC, Shear MK. A contemporary protocol to assist primary care physicians in the treatment of panic and generalized anxiety disorders. Gen Hosp Psychiatry 2003;25:74-82, .
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
88
A continuing educational initiative to develop nurses' mental health knowledge and skills in rural and remote areas
Type: Journal Article
Authors: E. Chang, J. Daly, P. Bell, T. Brown, J. Allan, K. Hancock
Year: 2002
Source:
Chang E, Daly J, Bell P, Brown T, Allan J, Hancock K. A continuing educational initiative to develop nurses' mental health knowledge and skills in rural and remote areas. Nurse Education Today 2002;22:542-551, . https://doi.org/Test 3.
Publication Place: Scotland
Abstract: At a time of ever increasing mental health problems in Australian society, the nursing profession is beset by problems of an insufficient workforce specialising in this area. Not only is there a shortage of suitable trained specialist mental health nurses, but undergraduate nursing programs inadequately prepare students for practical mental health nursing. Fewer students are enrolling in mental health nursing, and many nurses are leaving the workforce. A particular problem in rural Australia is that there is a lack of specialist mental health services, and nurses are being increasingly relied upon to perform the role of mental health nurse despite lacking the necessary qualifications and experience.This paper aims to describe the development, implementation and evaluation of a mental health continuing education program for nurses employed in rural and remote areas of New South Wales (NSW), Australia. This was a collaborative educational initiative mounted by the NSW Health Department (who funded the project), a rural university and a number of regional health service partners. The paper includes information on how this program was conceived, developed and conducted through distance education mode. It also evaluates the efficacy of this program as perceived by 202 out of 303 participants. Overall the project was rated very favourably, and represents a cost-effective, convenient method of enabling rural and regional nurses to update and improve their skills in mental health nursing.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
89
A controlled trial of inpatient and outpatient geriatric evaluation and management
Type: Journal Article
Authors: H. J. Cohen, J. R. Feussner, M. Weinberger, M. Carnes, R. C. Hamdy, F. Hsieh, C. Phibbs, P. Lavori
Year: 2002
Source:
Cohen HJ, Feussner JR, Weinberger M, Carnes M, Hamdy RC, Hsieh F, et al. A controlled trial of inpatient and outpatient geriatric evaluation and management. New England Journal Of Medicine 2002;346:905-912, .
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
90
A cultural change in the management of mental illness.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Mohammed Ahmed Rashid
Year: 2013
Source:
Rashid MA. A cultural change in the management of mental illness. Addiction 2013;108:1517-1518, .
Topic(s):
General Literature See topic collection
91
A Curriculum for an Interprofessional Seminar on Integrated Primary Care: Developing Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice
Type: Journal Article
Authors: R. H. Rozensky, C. L. Grus, J. L. Goodie, L. Bonin, B. D. Carpenter, B. F. Miller, K. M. Ross, B. D. Rybarczyk, A. Stewart, S. H. McDaniel
Year: 2018
Source:
Rozensky RH, Grus CL, Goodie JL, Bonin L, Carpenter BD, Miller BF, et al. A Curriculum for an Interprofessional Seminar on Integrated Primary Care: Developing Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice. Journal Of Allied Health 2018;47:e61-e66, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Health care is increasingly delivered through team-based, collaborative strategies with interprofessional education as an important mechanism for building interprofessional practice competencies. This paper describes an Interprofessional Seminar on Integrated Primary Care (IS-IPC) designed to meet this educational need with interprofessional team-based learning as the foundation of an iterative process such that education and practice inform one another. The IS-IPC can be used to educate an interprofessional group of learners about key topics relevant to working together in integrated primary care. The IS-IPC describes steps in developing an interprofessional seminar, common challenges, and their solutions in creating interprofessional learning experiences, and eight foundational content modules containing an outline and curricular resources. The IS-IPC facilitates interprofessional educator partnerships at the local level and can be customized to fit the local environment, pedagogical philosophy, and learning objectives.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
92
A Danish cost-effectiveness model of escitalopram in comparison with citalopram and venlafaxine as first-line treatments for major depressive disorder in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. Sorensen, K. B. Stage, N. Damsbo, A. Le Lay, M. E. Hemels
Year: 2007
Source:
Sorensen J, Stage KB, Damsbo N, Le Lay A, Hemels ME. A Danish cost-effectiveness model of escitalopram in comparison with citalopram and venlafaxine as first-line treatments for major depressive disorder in primary care. Nordic Journal Of Psychiatry 2007;61:100-108, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08039480701226070.
Publication Place: Norway
Abstract: The objective of this study was to model the cost-effectiveness of escitalopram in comparison with generic citalopram and venlafaxine in primary care treatment of major depressive disorder (baseline scores 22-40 on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, MADRS) in Denmark. A three-path decision analytic model with a 6-month horizon was used. All patients started at the primary care path and were referred to outpatient or inpatient secondary care in the case of insufficient response to treatment. Model inputs included drug-specific probabilities derived from systematic literature review, ad-hoc survey and expert opinion. Main outcome measures were remission defined as MADRS < or = 12 and treatment costs. Analyses were conducted from healthcare system and societal perspectives. The human capital approach was used to estimate societal cost of lost productivity. Costs were reported in 2004 DDK. The expected overall 6-month remission rate was higher for escitalopram (64.1%) than citalopram (58.9%). From both perspectives, the total expected cost per successfully treated patient was lower for escitalopram (DKK 22,323 healthcare, DKK 72,399 societal) than for citalopram (DKK 25,778 healthcare, DKK 87,786 societal). Remission rates and costs were similar for escitalopram and venlafaxine. Robustness of the findings was verified in multivariate sensitivity analyses. For patients in primary care, escitalopram appears to be a cost-effective alternative to (generic) citalopram, with greater clinical benefit and cost-savings, and similar in cost-effectiveness to venlafaxine.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
93
A day in the life of older adults: substance use facts
Type: Government Report
Authors: M. Mattson, R. N. Lipari, C. Hays, S. L. Van Horn
Year: 2017
Source:
Mattson M, Lipari RN, Hays C, Van Horn SL. A day in the life of older adults: substance use facts 2017.
Publication Place: Rockville, MD
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

94
A decade-long path to integration
Type: Journal Article
Authors: D. Grantham
Year: 2011
Source:
Grantham D. A decade-long path to integration. Behavioral Healthcare 2011;31:24-25, .
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
95
A Demonstration Of Shared Decision Making In Primary Care Highlights Barriers To Adoption And Potential Remedies
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. W. Friedberg, K. Van Busum, R. Wexler, M. Bowen, E. C. Schneider
Year: 2013
Source:
Friedberg MW, Van Busum K, Wexler R, Bowen M, Schneider EC. A Demonstration Of Shared Decision Making In Primary Care Highlights Barriers To Adoption And Potential Remedies. Health Affairs 2013;32:268-275, . https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1084.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
96
A demonstration project for using the electronic health record to identify and treat tobacco users
Type: Journal Article
Authors: C. Lindholm, R. Adsit, P. Bain, P. M. Reber, T. Brein, L. Redmond, S. S. Smith, M. C. Fiore
Year: 2010
Source:
Lindholm C, Adsit R, Bain P, Reber PM, Brein T, Redmond L, et al. A demonstration project for using the electronic health record to identify and treat tobacco users. Wmj : Official Publication Of The State Medical Society Of Wisconsin 2010;109:335-340, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: While the majority of smokers visit a primary care physician each year, only a small proportion of them receive evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment. The electronic health record (EHR) provides an opportunity to prompt clinicians to deliver tobacco dependence treatment in primary care. METHODS: Over 1 year, Dean Health Systems worked with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health to modify the existing Dean EHR system (Epic Systems Corp, Verona, Wisconsin) to improve identification and treatment of adult smokers visiting primary care clinics. Modifications included evidence-based prompts that helped guide medical assistants to identify smokers and clinicians to deliver a brief tobacco cessation intervention (medication and Wisconsin Tobacco Quit Line referral). Eighteen primary care clinics provided data 1 year before and 1 year after implementing the EHR modifications. RESULTS: A higher percentage of adult patients had their tobacco use status identified after EHR modification compared to pre-implementation (71.6% versus 78.4%, P < .001). During the post-implementation year, 6.3% of adult smokers were prescribed tobacco cessation medication, 2.5% of adult smokers had documentation of counseling, and 1.5% of adult smokers had counseling billed (pre-implementation data not available). CONCLUSIONS: This demonstration project showed that a large health care system can increase the delivery of tobacco dependence treatment interventions (increased identification of smokers and relatively high rates of delivering specific tobacco dependence clinical interventions) building on an existing EHR platform. The project demonstrated that brief, evidence-based tobacco dependence interventions can be incorporated into primary care, especially when the EHR is used to improve clinic workflow.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
97
A demonstration project implementing extended-release naltrexone in Los Angeles County
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Sarah J. Cousins, Loretta Denering, Desiree Crevecoeur-MacPhail, John Viernes, Wayne Sugita, James Barger, Tina Kim, Stefanie Weimann, Richard A. Rawson
Year: 2016
Source:
Cousins SJ, Denering L, Crevecoeur-MacPhail D, Viernes J, Sugita W, Barger J, et al. A demonstration project implementing extended-release naltrexone in Los Angeles County. Substance Abuse 2016;37:54-62, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2015.1052868.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
98
A descriptive qualitative study of the roles of family members in older men's depression treatment from the perspectives of older men and primary care providers
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. Hinton, E. C. Apesoa-Varano, J. Unutzer, M. Dwight-Johnson, M. Park, J. C. Barker
Year: 2014
Source:
Hinton L, Apesoa-Varano EC, Unutzer J, Dwight-Johnson M, Park M, Barker JC. A descriptive qualitative study of the roles of family members in older men's depression treatment from the perspectives of older men and primary care providers. International Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry 2014. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.4175.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
99
A Difference-in-Difference Analysis of Changes in Quality, Utilization and Cost Following the Colorado Multi-Payer Patient-Centered Medical Home Pilot
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. B. Rosenthal, S. Alidina, M. W. Friedberg, S. J. Singer, D. Eastman, Z. Li, E. C. Schneider
Year: 2016
Source:
Rosenthal MB, Alidina S, Friedberg MW, Singer SJ, Eastman D, Li Z, et al. A Difference-in-Difference Analysis of Changes in Quality, Utilization and Cost Following the Colorado Multi-Payer Patient-Centered Medical Home Pilot. Journal Of General Internal Medicine 2016;31:289-296, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-015-3521-1.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Research on the effects of patient-centered medical homes on quality and cost of care is mixed, so further study is needed to understand how and in what contexts they are effective. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate effects of a multi-payer pilot promoting patient-centered medical home implementation in 15 small and medium-sized primary care groups in Colorado. DESIGN: We conducted difference-in-difference analyses, comparing changes in utilization, costs, and quality between patients attributed to pilot and non-pilot practices. PARTICIPANTS: Approximately 98,000 patients attributed to 15 pilot and 66 comparison practices 2 years before and 3 years after the pilot launch. MAIN MEASURES: Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) derived measures of diabetes care, cancer screening, utilization, and costs to payers. KEY RESULTS: At the end of two years, we found a statistically significant reduction in emergency department use by 1.4 visits per 1000 member months, or approximately 7.9 % (p = 0.02). At the end of three years, pilot practices sustained this difference with 1.6 fewer emergency department visits per 1000 member months, or a 9.3 % reduction from baseline (p = 0.01). Emergency department costs were lower in the pilot practices after two (13.9 % reduction, p < 0.001) and three years (11.8 % reduction, p = 0.001). After three years, compared to control practices, primary care visits in the pilot practices decreased significantly (1.5 % reduction, p = 0.02). The pilot was associated with increased cervical cancer screening after two (12.5 % increase, p < 0.001) and three years (9.0 % increase, p < 0.001), but lower rates of HbA1c testing in patients with diabetes (0.7 % reduction at three years, p = 0.03) and colon cancer screening (21.1 % and 18.1 % at two and three years, respectively, p < 0.001). For patients with two or more comorbidities, similar patterns of association were found, except that there was also a reduction in ambulatory care sensitive inpatient admissions (10.3 %; p = 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that a multi-payer, patient-centered medical home initiative that provides financial and technical support to participating practices can produce sustained reductions in utilization with mixed results on process measures of quality.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
100
A different ball game altogether: Staff views on a primary mental healthcare service
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. Cook, A. Howe, J. Veal
Year: 2004
Source:
Cook S, Howe A, Veal J. A different ball game altogether: Staff views on a primary mental healthcare service. Primary Care Mental Health 2004;2:77-89, .
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection