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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 6,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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6455 Results
61
A collaborative care approach to depression treatment for Asian Americans
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. D. Ratzliff, K. Ni, Y. F. Chan, M. Park, J. Unutzer
Year: 2013
Source:
Ratzliff AD, Ni K, Chan YF, Park M, Unutzer J. A collaborative care approach to depression treatment for Asian Americans. Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.c.) 2013;64:487-490, . https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.001742012.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE This study examined effectiveness of collaborative care for depression among Asians treated either at a community health center that focuses on Asians (culturally sensitive clinic) or at general community health centers and among a matched population of whites treated at the same general community clinics. METHODS For 345 participants in a statewide collaborative care program, use of psychotropic medications, primary care visits with depression care managers, and depression severity (as measured with the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire) were tracked at baseline and 16 weeks. RESULTS After adjustment for differences in baseline demographic characteristics, all three groups had similar treatment process and depression outcomes. Asian patients served at the culturally sensitive clinic (N=129) were less likely than Asians (N=72) and whites (N=144) treated in general community health clinics to be prescribed psychotropic medications. CONCLUSIONS Collaborative care for depression showed similar response rates among all three groups.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
62
A collaborative care lexicon for asking practice and research development questions: A national agenda for research in collaborative care
Type: Government Report
Authors: C. J. Peek
Year: 2011
Source:
Peek CJ. A collaborative care lexicon for asking practice and research development questions: A national agenda for research in collaborative care 2011;11-0067.
Publication Place: Rockville, M.D.
Abstract: The Collaborative Care Research Network (CCRN), a sub-network of the American Academy of Family Physicians National Research Network and a practice-based research network, was formed to develop and implement a national, practice-based research agenda to evaluate the effectiveness of collaboration between behavioral health/substance abuse clinicians and primary medical care clinicians. Although research to date generally confirms positive outcomes from collaborative care, it is not clear just what components or methods account for those positive outcomes. Funding agencies and policymakers would like to know that so they can make focused investments in this area, particularly in context of the patient-centered medical home. The CCRN is designed to pose and answer such research questions in a way that can be understood consistently across geographically diverse practices. But experiences framing such research questions led to confusion about the meanings of terms in common use, especially regarding the components or dimensions of collaborative care that are the subject of research questions. Funding agencies and policymakers need consistently articulated concepts for this new scientific field rather than the highly variable language for these concepts presently in use. This lexicon or conceptual system for the field was created and used to formulate research questions as a product for Agency for Healthcare Researchand Quality (AHRQ). Such conceptual clarity, or pre-empirical work, has preceded the empirical triumphs we associate with mature scientific fields and is expected to release much more focused energy for empirical investigation in this field as well.
Topic(s):
Key & Foundational See topic collection
,
Grey Literature See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

63
A Collaborative Care Model to Improve Access to Pediatric Mental Health Services
Type: Journal Article
Authors: O. Aupont, L. Doerfler, D. F. Connor, C. Stille, M. Tisminetzky, T. J. McLaughlin
Year: 2012
Source:
Aupont O, Doerfler L, Connor DF, Stille C, Tisminetzky M, McLaughlin TJ. A Collaborative Care Model to Improve Access to Pediatric Mental Health Services. Administration And Policy In Mental Health And Mental Health Services Research 2012;40:264-273, . https://doi.org/10.1007/s10488-012-0413-0.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
64
A collaborative care team to integrate behavioral health care and treatment of poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes in an urban safety net primary care clinic
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. A. Chwastiak, S. L. Jackson, J. Russo, P. DeKeyser, M. Kiefer, B. Belyeu, K. Mertens, L. Chew, E. Lin
Year: 2017
Source:
Chwastiak LA, Jackson SL, Russo J, DeKeyser P, Kiefer M, Belyeu B, et al. A collaborative care team to integrate behavioral health care and treatment of poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes in an urban safety net primary care clinic. General Hospital Psychiatry 2017;44:10-15, .
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
65
A collaborative model for integrated mental and physical health care for the individual who is seriously and persistently mentally ill: The Washtenaw Community Health Organization
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Kathleen M. Reynolds, Barbara K. Chesney, Jeff Capobianco
Year: 2006
Source:
Reynolds KM, Chesney BK, Capobianco J. A collaborative model for integrated mental and physical health care for the individual who is seriously and persistently mentally ill: The Washtenaw Community Health Organization. Families, Systems, & Health 2006;24:19-27, . https://doi.org/10.1037/1091-7527.24.1.19.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
,
Key & Foundational See topic collection
66
A Collaborative Paradigm for Improving Management of Sleep Disorders in Primary Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. D. Edinger, J. Grubber, C. Ulmer, J. Zervakis, M. Olsen
Year: 2016
Source:
Edinger JD, Grubber J, Ulmer C, Zervakis J, Olsen M. A Collaborative Paradigm for Improving Management of Sleep Disorders in Primary Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Sleep 2016;39:237-247, . https://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.5356.
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
67
A comparison of an opioid abuse screening tool and prescription drug monitoring data in the emergency department
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. G. Weiner, L. C. Horton, T. C. Green, S. F. Butler
Year: 2016
Source:
Weiner SG, Horton LC, Green TC, Butler SF. A comparison of an opioid abuse screening tool and prescription drug monitoring data in the emergency department. Drug And Alcohol Dependence 2016;159:152-157, . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.12.007.
Publication Place: Ireland
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
68
A comparison of assertive community treatment fidelity measures and patient-centered medical home standards
Type: Journal Article
Authors: E. R. Vanderlip, J. M. Cerimele, M. Monroe-Devita
Year: 2013
Source:
Vanderlip ER, Cerimele JM, Monroe-Devita M. A comparison of assertive community treatment fidelity measures and patient-centered medical home standards. Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.c.) 2013;64:1127-1133, . https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201200469.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: OBJECTIVE This study compared program measures of assertive community treatment (ACT) with standards of accreditation for the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) to determine whether there were similarities in the infrastructure of the two methods of service delivery and whether high-fidelity ACT teams would qualify for medical home accreditation. METHODS The authors compared National Committee for Quality Assurance PCMH standards with two ACT fidelity measures (the Dartmouth Assertive Community Treatment Scale and the Tool for Measurement of Assertive Community Treatment [TMACT]) and with national ACT program standards. RESULTS PCMH standards pertaining to enhanced access and continuity, management of care, and self-care support demonstrated strong overlap across ACT measures. Standards for identification and management of populations, care coordination and follow-up, and quality improvement demonstrated less overlap. The TMACT and the program standards had sufficient overlap to score in the range of a level 1 PCMH, but no ACT measure sufficiently detailed methods of population-based screening and tracking of referrals to satisfy "must-pass" elements of the standards. CONCLUSIONS ACT measures and medical home standards had significant overlap in innate infrastructure. ACT teams following the program standards or undergoing TMACT fidelity review could have the necessary infrastructure to serve as medical homes if they were properly equipped to supervise general medical care and administer activities to improve management of chronic diseases.
Topic(s):
Measures See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
69
A comparison of buprenorphine induction strategies: Patient-centered home-based inductions versus standard-of-care office-based inductions.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Chinazo O. Cunningham, Angela Giovanniello, Xuan Li, Hillary V. Kunins, Robert J. Roose, Nancy L. Sohler
Year: 2011
Source:
Cunningham CO, Giovanniello A, Li X, Kunins HV, Roose RJ, Sohler NL. A comparison of buprenorphine induction strategies: Patient-centered home-based inductions versus standard-of-care office-based inductions. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment 2011;40:349-356, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
70
A comparison of buprenorphine taper outcomes between prescription opioid and heroin users.
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Suzanne Nielsen, Maureen Hillhouse, Christie Thomas, Albert Hasson, Walter Ling
Year: 2013
Source:
Nielsen S, Hillhouse M, Thomas C, Hasson A, Ling W. A comparison of buprenorphine taper outcomes between prescription opioid and heroin users. Journal Of Addiction Medicine 2013;7:33-38, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
71
A Comparison of Cognitive Function in Patients under Maintenance Treatment with Heroin, Methadone, or Buprenorphine and Healthy Controls: An Open Pilot Study
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Michael Soyka, Claudia Limmer, Robert Lehnert, Gabriele Koller, Gabriele Martin, Heinrich Kufner, S. Kagerer, Annina Haberthur
Year: 2011
Source:
Soyka M, Limmer C, Lehnert R, Koller G, Martin G, Kufner H, et al. A Comparison of Cognitive Function in Patients under Maintenance Treatment with Heroin, Methadone, or Buprenorphine and Healthy Controls: An Open Pilot Study. The American Journal Of Drug And Alcohol Abuse 2011;37:497+.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
72
A Comparison of Collaborative Care Outcomes in Two Health Care Systems: VA Clinics and Federally Qualified Health Centers
Type: Journal Article
Authors: K. M. Grubbs, J. C. Fortney, J. Pyne, D. Mittal, J. Ray, T. J. Hudson
Year: 2018
Source:
Grubbs KM, Fortney JC, Pyne J, Mittal D, Ray J, Hudson TJ. A Comparison of Collaborative Care Outcomes in Two Health Care Systems: VA Clinics and Federally Qualified Health Centers. Psychiatric Services 2018;69:431-437, . https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201700067.
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Collaborative care for depression results in symptom reduction when compared with usual care. No studies have systematically compared collaborative care outcomes between veterans treated at Veterans Affairs (VA) clinics and civilians treated at publicly funded federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) after controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics. METHODS: Data from two randomized controlled trials that used a similar collaborative care intervention for depression were combined to conduct post hoc analyses (N=759). The Telemedicine-Enhanced Antidepressant Management intervention was delivered in VA community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs), and the Outreach Using Telemedicine for Rural Enhanced Access in Community Health intervention was delivered in FQHCs. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine whether veteran status moderated the effect of the intervention on treatment response (>50% reduction in symptoms). RESULTS: There was a significant main effect for intervention (odds ratio [OR]=5.23, p<.001) and a moderating effect for veteran status, with lower response rates among veterans compared with civilians (OR=.21, p=.01). The addition of variables representing medication dosage and number of mental health and general health appointments did not influence the moderating effect. A sensitivity analysis stratified by gender found a significant moderating effect of veteran status for men but not women. CONCLUSIONS: Veteran status was a significant moderator of collaborative care effectiveness for depression, indicating that veterans receiving collaborative care at a CBOC are at risk of nonresponse. Unmeasured patient- or system-level characteristics may contribute to poorer response among veterans.
Topic(s):
General Literature See topic collection
73
A comparison of common screening methods for predicting aberrant drug-related behavior among patients receiving opioids for chronic pain management
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. M. Moore, T. Jones, J. H. Browder, S. Daffron, S. D. Passik
Year: 2009
Source:
Moore TM, Jones T, Browder JH, Daffron S, Passik SD. A comparison of common screening methods for predicting aberrant drug-related behavior among patients receiving opioids for chronic pain management. Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.) 2009;10:1426-1433, . https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4637.2009.00743.x.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: The ability to predict risk for violating opioid medication policies, known as aberrant drug-related behavior, is critical for providing optimal treatment. Many pain management centers measure risk using one of several partially validated measures: the Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain (SOAPP), the Diagnosis, Intractability, Risk, and Efficacy inventory (DIRE), and/or the Opioid Risk Tool (ORT). However, little is known about how these measures compare with each other in predicting aberrant drug-related behavior and discontinuance of opioid pain medications. The current study aimed to address this research question. PATIENTS: Participants were 48 patients who attended a pain management center in Tennessee but were later discontinued from opioids for aberrant drug-related behavior. Patients referred for opioid medication for pain management participated in a semi-structured clinical interview with the staff psychologist and completed the aforementioned measures. Patients generally returned to the pain clinic on a monthly basis for medication management. Results. Analyses compared the sensitivity of each self-report measure and the clinical interview in predicting discontinuance for aberrant drug-related behavior. RESULTS: showed the highest sensitivity for the clinical interview (0.77) and the SOAPP (0.72), followed by the ORT (0.45) and the DIRE (0.17). Combining the clinical interview with the SOAPP increased sensitivity to 0.90. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients who were discontinued from opioids for aberrant drug-related behaviors, the clinical interview and the SOAPP were most effective at predicting risk at baseline. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
74
A comparison of GP and GDS diagnosis of depression in late life among multimorbid patients - Results of the MultiCare study
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Michaela Schwarzbach, Melanie Luppa, Heike Hansen, Hans-Helmut Konig, Jochen Gensichen, Juliana J. Petersen, Gerhard Schon, Birgitt Wiese, Siegfried Weyerer, Horst Bickel, Angela Fuchs, Wolfgang Maier, Hendrik van den Bussche, Martin Scherer, Steffi G. Riedel-Heller
Year: 2014
Source:
Schwarzbach M, Luppa M, Hansen H, Konig H-H, Gensichen J, Petersen JJ, et al. A comparison of GP and GDS diagnosis of depression in late life among multimorbid patients - Results of the MultiCare study. Journal Of Affective Disorders 2014;168:276-283, .
Publication Place: Amsterdam
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
75
A comparison of methods for capturing patient preferences for delivery of mental health services to low-income Hispanics engaged in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Patricia M. Herman, Maia Ingram, Charles E. Cunningham, Heather Rimas, Lucy Murrieta, Kenneth Schachter, Jill Guernsey de Zapien, Scott C. Carvajal
Year: 2016
Source:
Herman PM, Ingram M, Cunningham CE, Rimas H, Murrieta L, Schachter K, et al. A comparison of methods for capturing patient preferences for delivery of mental health services to low-income Hispanics engaged in primary care. The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research 2016;9:293-301, .
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
76
A comparison of methods of administering the opioid risk tool
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. Jones, S. D. Passik
Year: 2011
Source:
Jones T, Passik SD. A comparison of methods of administering the opioid risk tool. Journal Of Opioid Management 2011;7:347-351, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Risk assessment and stratification have become important aspects for the prescription of opioids to patients with chronic pain. Recent research has shown that the Opioid Risk Tool (ORT), a widely used risk assessment tool, has poor predictive abilities when compared with other risk assessment methods. This study compares two different methods of administration of the ORT to further study this issue. Patients at a pain practice were given an ORT to complete per the usual method of administration. In addition, a separate blinded ORT was completed by a psychologist after conducting a clinical interview with the patient. The results of the patient-completed ORT (PC-ORT) and the clinician-completed ORT (CC-ORT) were compared. There were significant differences found between the two, with the psychologist usually rating the patient higher in risk. The CC-ORT demonstrated better prediction of aberrant drug-taking behavior than the PC-ORT. The items that were discrepant between the two suggest that the differences were primarily due to comprehension issues. A strategy to help maximize the usefulness of the ORT derived from this finding and clinical experience is discussed.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Measures See topic collection
77
A comparison of patient recall of smoking cessation advice with advice recorded in electronic medical records
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. Szatkowski, A. McNeill, S. Lewis, T. Coleman
Year: 2011
Source:
Szatkowski L, McNeill A, Lewis S, Coleman T. A comparison of patient recall of smoking cessation advice with advice recorded in electronic medical records. Bmc Public Health 2011;11:291+. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-11-291.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Brief cessation advice delivered to smokers during routine primary care consultations increases smoking cessation rates. However, in previous studies investigating recall of smoking cessation advice, smokers have reported more advice being received than is actually documented in their medical records. Recording of smoking cessation advice in UK primary care medical records has increased since the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) in 2004, and so we compare recall and recording of cessation advice since this time to assess whether or not agreement between these two data sources has improved. METHODS: For each year from 2000 to 2009, the proportion of patients in The Health Improvement Network Database (THIN) with a recording of cessation advice in their notes in the last 12 months was calculated. In 2004, 2005 and 2008, these figures were compared to rates of patients recalling having received cessation advice in the last 12 months in the Primary Care Trust (PCT) Patient Surveys, with adjustment for age, sex and regional differences between the populations. RESULTS: In 2004 there was good agreement between the proportion of THIN patients who had cessation advice recorded in their medical records and the proportion recalling advice in the Patient Survey. However, in both 2005 and 2008, more patients had cessation advice recorded in their medical records than recalled receiving advice. CONCLUSIONS: Since the introduction of the QOF, the rate of recording of cessation advice in primary care medical records has exceeded that of patient recall. Whilst both data sources have limitations, our study suggests that, in recent years, the proportion of smokers being advised to quit by primary care health professionals may not have improved as much as the improved recording rates imply.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
78
A comparison of random and post-accident urine opiate and opioid tests
Type: Journal Article
Authors: James W. Price
Year: 2015
Source:
Price JW. A comparison of random and post-accident urine opiate and opioid tests. Journal Of Addictive Diseases 2015;34:36-42, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
79
A comparison of Tier 1 and Tier 3 medical homes under Oklahoma Medicaid program
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. I. Kumar, M. Anthony, S. A. Crawford, R. A. Arky, A. Bitton, G. L. Splinter
Year: 2014
Source:
Kumar JI, Anthony M, Crawford SA, Arky RA, Bitton A, Splinter GL. A comparison of Tier 1 and Tier 3 medical homes under Oklahoma Medicaid program. The Journal Of The Oklahoma State Medical Association 2014;107:157-161, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a team-based model of care that seeks to improve quality of care and control costs. The Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) directs Oklahoma's Medicaid program and contracts with 861 medical home practices across the state in one of three tiers of operational capacity: Tier 1 (Basic), Tier 2 (Advanced) and Tier 3 (Optimal). Only 13.5% (n = 116) homes are at the optimal level; the majority (59%, n = 508) at the basic level. In this study, we sought to determine the barriers that prevented Tier 1 homes from advancing to Tier 3 level and the incentives that would motivate providers to advance from Tier 1 to 3. Our hypotheses were that Tier 1 medical homes were located in smaller practices with limited resources and the providers are not convinced that the expense of advancing from Tier 1 status to Tier 3 status was worth the added value. METHODS: We analyzed OHCA records to compare the 508 Tier 1 (entry-level) with 116 Tier 3 (optimal) medical homes for demographic differences with regards to location: urban or rural, duration as medical home, percentage of contracts that were group contracts, number of providers per group contract, panel age range, panel size, and member-provider ratio. We surveyed all 508 Tier 1 homes with a mail-in survey, and with focused follow up visits to identify the barriers to, and incentives for, upgrading from Tier 1 to Tier 2 or 3. RESULTS: We found that Tier 1 homes were more likely to be in rural areas, run by solo practitioners, serve exclusively adult panels, have smaller panel sizes, and have higher member-to-provider ratios in comparison with Tier 3 homes. Our survey had a 35% response rate. Results showed that the most difficult changes for Tier 1 homes to implement were providing 4 hours of after-hours care and a dedicated program for mental illness and substance abuse. The results also showed that the most compelling incentives for encouraging Tier 1 homes to upgrade their tier status were less"red tape"with prior authorizations, higher pay, and help with panel member follow-up. DISCUSSION: Multiple interventions may help medical homes in Oklahoma advance from the basic to the optimal level such as sharing of resources among nearby practices, expansion of OHCA online resources to help with preauthorizations and patient follow up, and the generation and transmission of data on the benefits of medical homes.
Topic(s):
Medical Home See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
80
A comparison of two screening instruments in detecting psychiatric morbidity in a Nigerian pediatric primary care service: assessing clinical suitability and applicability
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. F. Tunde-Ayinmode, B. A. Ayinmode, O. A. Adegunloye, O. A. Abiodun
Year: 2012
Source:
Tunde-Ayinmode MF, Ayinmode BA, Adegunloye OA, Abiodun OA. A comparison of two screening instruments in detecting psychiatric morbidity in a Nigerian pediatric primary care service: assessing clinical suitability and applicability. Annals Of African Medicine 2012;11:203-211, . https://doi.org/10.4103/1596-3519.102849.
Publication Place: India
Abstract: BACKGROUND: To improve poor attendance and underutilization of the child and adolescent psychiatric service in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria, we compared a child behavior questionnaire (CBQ) with reporting questionnaire for children (RQC) for use in our primary care unit where the bulk of referrals come from to determine which is more applicable. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional two-stage study on the prevalence and pattern of psychiatric disorders in children attending the primary care unit of University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, over a 6-month period. CBQ and RQC were completed by the mothers of 350 children aged 7-14 years in the first stage; in the second, a stratified subsample of 157 children based on scores on CBQ were interviewed using the children's version of the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia (Kiddie-SADS-PL). The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was carried out to determine the screening properties of CBQ and RQC. RESULTS: The optimal cutoff score for CBQ and RQC were 7 and 1, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and misclassification rates at the cutoff for CBQ was 0.8 (80%); 0 96 (96%); 0.083 (8.3%), and RQC was 0.90 (90%); 0.78 (78%); 0.19 (19%). The discriminating ability of CBQ indicated by the area under the curve (AUC) in the ROC was 0.93 while RQC was 0.88. CONCLUSION: Even with the evident marginal superior discriminating ability of CBQ in our study in primary care, RQC has the advantage of brevity and ease of application for workers at this level. In the child and adolescent clinic CBQ may still be preferred.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection