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Opioids & SU

The Literature Collection contains over 6,000 references for published and grey literature on the integration of behavioral health and primary care. Learn More

Use the Search feature below to find references for your terms across the entire Literature Collection, or limit your searches by Authors, Keywords, or Titles and by Year, Type, or Topic. View your search results as displayed, or use the options to: Show more references per page; Sort references by Title or Date; and Refine your search criteria. Expand an individual reference to View Details. Full-text access to the literature may be available through a link to PubMed, a DOI, or a URL. References may also be exported for use in bibliographic software (e.g., EndNote, RefWorks, Zotero).

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41
A buprenorphine education and training program for primary care residents: Implementation and evaluation
Type: Journal Article
Authors: H. V. Kunins, N. L. Sohler, A. Giovanniello, D. Thompson, C. O. Cunningham
Year: 2013
Source:
Kunins HV, Sohler NL, Giovanniello A, Thompson D, Cunningham CO. A buprenorphine education and training program for primary care residents: Implementation and evaluation. Substance Abuse 2013;34:242-247, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2012.752777.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Although substance use disorders are highly prevalent, resident preparation to care for patients with these disorders is frequently insufficient. With increasing rates of opioid abuse and dependence, and the availability of medication-assisted treatment, one strategy to improve resident skills is to incorporate buprenorphine treatment into training settings. METHODS: In this study, esidency faculty delivered the BupEd education and training program to 71 primary care residents. BupEd included (1) a didactic session on buprenorphine, (2) an interactive motivational interviewing session, (3) monthly case conferences, and (4) supervised clinical experience providing buprenorphine treatment. To evaluate BupEd, the authors assessed (1) residents' provision of buprenorphine treatment during residency, (2) residents' provision of buprenorphine treatment after residency, and (3) treatment retention among patients treated by resident versus attending physicians. RESULTS: Of 71 residents, most served as a covering or primary provider to at least 1 buprenorphine-treated patient (84.5 and 66.2%, respectively). Of 40 graduates, 27.5% obtained a buprenorphine waiver and 17.5% prescribed buprenorphine. Treatment retention was similar between patients cared for by resident PCPs versus attending PCPs (90-day retention: 63.6% [n = 35] vs. 67.9% [n = 152]; P = .55). CONCLUSION: These results show that BupEd is feasible, provides residents with supervised clinical experience in treating opioid-dependent patients, and can serve as a model to prepare primary care physicians to care for patients with opioid dependence.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
42
A care management model for enhancing physician practice for Alzheimer Disease in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Mary Guerriero Austrom, Cora Hartwell, Patricia S. Moore, Malaz Boustani, Hugh C. Hendrie, Christopher M. Callahan
Year: 2005
Source:
Austrom MG, Hartwell C, Moore PS, Boustani M, Hendrie HC, Callahan CM. A care management model for enhancing physician practice for Alzheimer Disease in primary care. Clinical Gerontologist: The Journal Of Aging And Mental Health 2005;29:35-43, . https://doi.org/10.1300/J018v29n02_05.
Publication Place: US: Haworth Press
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
43
A case of pseudosomatization disorder
Type: Web Resource
Authors: S. Epstein, R. M. McCarron
Year: 2006
Source:
Epstein S, McCarron RM. A case of pseudosomatization disorder. Psychiatric Times 2006;23.
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.

44
A case report: Implementing a nurse telecare program for treating depression in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. F. Meresman, E. M. Hunkeler, W. A. Hargreaves, A. J. Kirsch, P. Robinson, A. Green, E. Z. Mann, M. Getzell, P. Feigenbaum
Year: 2003
Source:
Meresman JF, Hunkeler EM, Hargreaves WA, Kirsch AJ, Robinson P, Green A, et al. A case report: Implementing a nurse telecare program for treating depression in primary care. The Psychiatric Quarterly 2003;74:61-73, .
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: The treatment of depression in primary care needs improvement. Previously, we reported that a nurse telecare intervention for treating depression in primary care clinics significantly improved treatment outcomes. The usefulness of nurse telecare, however, depends upon the feasibility of dissemination. In this report we describe nurse telecare and the steps required for implementation, and describe its dissemination in various settings. In addition to medication, which is managed by a primary care physician, the key elements of nurse telecare are focused behavioral activation, emotional support, patient education, promotion of treatment adherence, and monitoring of progress, delivered in ten brief telephone appointments over four months by primary care nurses. Support from key administrators and clinical champions is crucial to success. Nurses need "dedicated" scheduled time for telecare activities. Nurse telecare has been piloted and disseminated in diverse settings. The model required only small modifications for dissemination, and was implemented with minimal investment of resources and no negative impact on clinic operations.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
45
A case series of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in a primary care practice
Type: Journal Article
Authors: B. Doolittle, W. Becker
Year: 2011
Source:
Doolittle B, Becker W. A case series of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in a primary care practice. Substance Abuse 2011;32:262-265, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2011.599256.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Physicians' adoption of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment is hindered by concerns over feasibility, cost, and lack of comfort treating patients with addiction. We examined the use of buprenorphine/naloxone in a community practice by two generalist physicians without addiction training, employing a retrospective chart review. From 2006-2010, 228 patients with opiate abuse/dependence were treated with buprenorphine/naloxone using a home-induction protocol. Multiple co-morbidities including diabetes (23% of patients), hypertension (36%), Hepatitis C (43%), and depression (74%) were concurrently managed. In this diverse sample, 1/228 experienced precipitated withdrawal during induction. Of the convenience subsample analyzed (n = 28), 82% (+/-10%) had negative urine drug tests for opioids; 92% (+/-11%) were negative for cocaine; 88% (+/-12%) were positive for buprenorphine. This case series demonstrated feasibility and safety of a low-cost buprenorphine/naloxone home induction protocol employed by generalists. Concurrent treatment of multiple comorbidities conforms with the patient-centered medical home ideal. Randomized trials of this promising approach are needed.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
46
A case study of early experience with implementation of collaborative care in the Veterans Health Administration
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. Tai-Seale, M. E. Kunik, A. Shepherd, J. Kirchner, A. Gottumukkala
Year: 2010
Source:
Tai-Seale M, Kunik ME, Shepherd A, Kirchner J, Gottumukkala A. A case study of early experience with implementation of collaborative care in the Veterans Health Administration. Population Health Management 2010;13:331-337, . https://doi.org/10.1089/pop.2009.0082.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: Primary care remains critically important for those who suffer from mental disorders. Although collaborative care, which integrates mental health services into primary care, has been shown to be more effective than usual care, its implementation has been slow and the experience of providers and patients with collaborative care is less well known. The objective of this case study was to examine the effects of collaborative care on patient and primary care provider (PCP) experiences and communication during clinical encounters. Participating physicians completed a self-administered visit reconstruction questionnaire in which they logged details of patient visits and described their perceptions of the visits and the influence of collaborative care. Audio recordings of visits were analyzed to assess the extent of discussion about colocated mental health services and visit time devoted to mental health topics. The main outcome measures were the extent of discussion and recommendation for collaborative care during clinical visits and providers' experiences based on their responses to the visit reconstruction questionnaire. Providers surveyed expressed enthusiasm about collaborative care and cited the time constraint of office visits and lack of specialty support as the main reasons for limiting their discussion of mental health topics with patients. Despite the availability of mental health providers at the same clinic, PCPs missed many opportunities to address mental health issues with their patients. Ongoing education for PCPs regarding how to conduct a "warm handoff" to colocated providers will need to be an integral part of the implementation of collaborative care.
Topic(s):
General Literature See topic collection
47
A Change in Perspective: From Dual Diagnosis to Multimorbidity
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Ish P. Bhalla, Robert A. Rosenheck
Year: 2017
Source:
Bhalla IP, Rosenheck RA. A Change in Perspective: From Dual Diagnosis to Multimorbidity. Psychiatric Services 2017. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201700194.
Abstract: Objective: There has been increasing interest within psychiatry in the concept of multimorbidity because psychiatric patients typically present with multiple concurrent disorders, these disorders mutually exacerbate one another, and their interaction shapes treatment options. Metrics have not been developed to document multimorbidity in psychiatric clinical practice. Methods: Four classes of indicators relevant to multimorbidity were defined and evaluated among veterans treated in mental health specialty clinics nationally in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in fiscal year 2012. Results: Of the 843,583 veterans with at least three visits to a specialty mental health clinic, 94.6% had more than one general medical or mental disorder and 77.6% had more than one mental disorder, compared with 30.6% with co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders. Conclusions: Real-world psychiatric care is more accurately approached from the multimorbidity perspective than from the perspective of principal, dual, or comorbid diagnoses.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
48
A chronic opioid therapy dose reduction policy in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. B. Weimer, D. M. Hartung, S. Ahmed, C. Nicolaidis
Year: 2016
Source:
Weimer MB, Hartung DM, Ahmed S, Nicolaidis C. A chronic opioid therapy dose reduction policy in primary care. Substance Abuse 2016;37:141-147, . https://doi.org/10.1080/08897077.2015.1129526.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: BACKGROUND: High-dose opioids prescribed for the treatment of chronic pain have been associated with increased risk of opioid overdose. Health systems and states have responded by developing opioid dose limitation policies. Little is known about how these policies affect prescribing practices or characteristics of patients who respond best to opioid tapers from high-dose opioids. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate change in total opioid dose after the implementation of a provider education intervention and a 120 mg morphine equivalents per day (MED) opioid dose limitation policy in one academic primary care clinic. We compared opioid prescriptions 1 year before and 1 year after the intervention. We used univariate and multivariate logistic regression to assess which patient characteristics predicted opioid dose reduction from high opioid dose. RESULTS: Out of a total of 516 patients prescribed chronic opioid therapy, 116 patients (22%) were prescribed high-dose opioid therapy (>120 mg MED). After policy adoption, the average daily dose of opioids declined by 64 mg MED (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-96; P < .001) and 41 patients (37%) on high-dose opioids tapered their doses below 120 mg MED (Tapered to Safer Dose group). In multivariate analyses, female sex was the only significant association with dose taper; female patients were less likely to taper to a safer dose (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.28, 95% CI: 0.11-0.70). CONCLUSIONS: A combined intervention of education and a practice policy that limits opioid doses for patients prescribed chronic opioid therapy may be an important component of system-level strategies to reduce opioid misuse and overdose; it may also help identify patients suitable for medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder. Specific strategies may be needed to assist women with opioid dose tapers.
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Education & Workforce See topic collection
49
A Clinical Care Algorithmic Toolkit for Promoting Screening and Next-Level Assessment of Pediatric Depression and Anxiety in Primary Care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: L. Honigfeld, S. J. Macary, D. J. Grasso
Year: 2017
Source:
Honigfeld L, Macary SJ, Grasso DJ. A Clinical Care Algorithmic Toolkit for Promoting Screening and Next-Level Assessment of Pediatric Depression and Anxiety in Primary Care. Journal Of Pediatric Health Care : Official Publication Of National Association Of Pediatric Nurse Associates & Practitioners 2017;31:e15-e23, .
Publication Place: United States
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
50
A Clinical Care Monitoring and Data Collection Tool (H3 Tracker) to Assess Uptake and Engagement in Mental Health Care Services in a Community-Based Pediatric Integrated Care Model: Longitudinal Cohort Study
Type: Journal Article
Authors: M. McCreary, A. C. Arevian, M. Brady, A. E. Mosqueda Chichits, L. Zhang, L. Tang, B. Zima
Year: 2019
Source:
McCreary M, Arevian AC, Brady M, Chichits AEM, Zhang L, Tang L, et al. A Clinical Care Monitoring and Data Collection Tool (H3 Tracker) to Assess Uptake and Engagement in Mental Health Care Services in a Community-Based Pediatric Integrated Care Model: Longitudinal Cohort Study. Jmir Mental Health 2019;6. https://doi.org/10.2196/12358.
Publication Place: Canada
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
51
A clinical prediction rule for detecting major depressive disorder in primary care: the PREDICT-NL study
Type: Journal Article
Authors: N. P. Zuithoff, Y. Vergouwe, M. King, I. Nazareth, E. Hak, K. G. Moons, M. I. Geerlings
Year: 2009
Source:
Zuithoff NP, Vergouwe Y, King M, Nazareth I, Hak E, Moons KG, et al. A clinical prediction rule for detecting major depressive disorder in primary care: the PREDICT-NL study. Family Practice 2009;26:241-250, . https://doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmp036.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder often remains unrecognized in primary care. OBJECTIVE: Development of a clinical prediction rule using easily obtainable predictors for major depressive disorder in primary care patients. METHODS: A total of 1046 subjects, aged 18-65 years, were included from seven large general practices in the center of The Netherlands. All subjects were recruited in the general practice waiting room, irrespective of their presenting complaint. Major depressive disorder according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Text Revision edition criteria was assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Candidate predictors were gender, age, educational level, being single, number of presented complaints, presence of non-somatic complaints, whether a diagnosis was assigned, consultation rate in past 12 months, presentation of depressive complaints or prescription of antidepressants in past 12 months, number of life events in past 6 months and any history of depression. RESULTS: The first multivariable logistic regression model including only predictors that require no confronting depression-related questions had a reasonable degree of discrimination (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve or concordance-statistic (c-statistic) = 0.71; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.67-0.76). Addition of three simple though more depression-related predictors, number of life events and history of depression, significantly increased the c-statistic to 0.80 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). After transforming this second model to an easily to use risk score, the lowest risk category (sum score or = 30). CONCLUSION: A clinical prediction rule allows GPs to identify patients-irrespective of their complaints-in whom diagnostic workup for major depressive disorder is indicated.
Topic(s):
Medically Unexplained Symptoms See topic collection
52
A clinical psychologist in GP-Land: an evaluation of brief psychological interventions in primary care
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. Dath, C . Y. Dong, M. W. Stewart, E. Sables
Year: 2014
Source:
Dath S, . Y. Dong C, Stewart MW, Sables E. A clinical psychologist in GP-Land: an evaluation of brief psychological interventions in primary care. The New Zealand Medical Journal 2014;127:62-73, .
Publication Place: New Zealand
Abstract: AIM: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and other impacts of brief therapy provided in a primary care setting by a clinical psychologist who was mainly employed in secondary mental health. METHOD: The outcomes of 23 primary care patients referred to a clinical psychologist were evaluated using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), the World Health Organisation Quality of Life (WHOQoL) scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A mixture of quantitative and qualitative data from patients and staff were analysed to identify other impacts of the intervention. RESULTS: Large improvements in BDI, GHQ, and WHOQOL scores were found, with strong changes consistent with the targets of the intervention. Patients reported primary-based clinical psychology input was more convenient and many engaged who had resisted referral to secondary mental health services. Other benefits to the service, including improved primary-secondary service integration, improved primary management of mental health difficulties, and improved liaison with mental health specialists, were reported by primary health staff. CONCLUSION: Brief psychological interventions by a visiting clinical psychologist in a general practice setting had substantial benefits for the patients and for the practice. This project indicates the value of integrated psychological input consistent with recent moves to better primary-secondary integration in mental health care.
Topic(s):
General Literature See topic collection
53
A clinical trial of peer-based culturally responsive person-centered care for psychosis for African Americans and Latinos
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. Tondora, M. O'Connell, R. Miller, T. Dinzeo, C. Bellamy, R. Andres-Hyman, L. Davidson
Year: 2010
Source:
Tondora J, O'Connell M, Miller R, Dinzeo T, Bellamy C, Andres-Hyman R, et al. A clinical trial of peer-based culturally responsive person-centered care for psychosis for African Americans and Latinos. Clinical Trials (London, England) 2010;7:368-379, . https://doi.org/10.1177/1740774510369847.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Providing culturally competent and person-centered care is at the forefront of changing practices in behavioral health. Significant health disparities remain between people of color and whites in terms of care received in the mental health system. Peer services, or support provided by others who have experience in the behavioral health system, is a promising new avenue for helping those with behavioral health concerns move forward in their lives. PURPOSE: We describe a model of peer-based culturally competent person-centered care and treatment planning, informed by longstanding research on recovery from serious mental illness used in a randomized clinical trial conducted at two community mental health centers. METHODS: Participants all were Latino or African American with a current or past diagnosis within the psychotic disorders spectrum as this population is often underserved with limited access to culturally responsive, person-centered services. Study interventions were carried out in both an English-speaking and a Spanish-speaking outpatient program at each study center. Interventions included connecting individuals to their communities of choice and providing assistance in preparing for treatment planning meetings, all delivered by peer-service providers. Three points of evaluation, at baseline, 6 and 18 months, explored the impact of the interventions on areas such as community engagement, satisfaction with treatment, symptom distress, ethnic identity, personal empowerment, and quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Lessons learned from implementation include making cultural modifications, the need for a longer engagement period with participants, and the tension between maintaining strict interventions while addressing the individual needs of participants in line with person-centered principles. The study is one of the first to rigorously test peer-supported interventions in implementing person-centered care within the context of public mental health systems.
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
54
A clinically integrated curriculum in evidence-based medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: The EU-EBM project
Type: Journal Article
Authors: S. F. Coppus, J. I. Emparanza, J. Hadley, R. Kulier, S. Weinbrenner, T. N. Arvanitis, A. Burls, J. B. Cabello, T. Decsi, A. R. Horvath, M. Kaczor, G. Zanrei, K. Pierer, K. Stawiarz, R. Kunz, B. W. Mol, K. S. Khan
Year: 2007
Source:
Coppus SF, Emparanza JI, Hadley J, Kulier R, Weinbrenner S, Arvanitis TN, et al. A clinically integrated curriculum in evidence-based medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: The EU-EBM project. Bmc Medical Education 2007;7:46+. https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6920-7-46.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Over the last years key stake holders in the healthcare sector have increasingly recognised evidence based medicine (EBM) as a means to improving the quality of healthcare. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the best way to disseminate basic knowledge of EBM. As a result, huge variation in EBM educational provision, setting, duration, intensity, content, and teaching methodology exists across Europe and worldwide. Most courses for health care professionals are delivered outside the work context ('stand alone') and lack adaptation to the specific needs for EBM at the learners' workplace. Courses with modern 'adaptive' EBM teaching that employ principles of effective continuing education might fill that gap. We aimed to develop a course for post-graduate education which is clinically integrated and allows maximum flexibility for teachers and learners. METHODS: A group of experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions from eight European countries participated. We used an established methodology of curriculum development to design a clinically integrated EBM course with substantial components of e-learning. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. RESULTS: We defined explicit learning objectives about knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour for the five steps of EBM. A handbook guides facilitator and learner through five modules with clinical and e-learning components. Focussed activities and targeted assignments round off the learning process, after which each module is formally assessed. CONCLUSION: The course is learner-centred, problem-based, integrated with activities in the workplace and flexible. When successfully implemented, the course is designed to provide just-in-time learning through on-the-job-training, with the potential for teaching and learning to directly impact on practice.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
55
A clustered controlled trial of the implementation and effectiveness of a medical home to improve health care of people with serious mental illness: study protocol
Type: Journal Article
Authors: A. S. Young, A. N. Cohen, E. T. Chang, A. W. P. Flynn, A. B. Hamilton, R. Oberman, M. Vinzon
Year: 2018
Source:
Young AS, Cohen AN, Chang ET, Flynn AWP, Hamilton AB, Oberman R, et al. A clustered controlled trial of the implementation and effectiveness of a medical home to improve health care of people with serious mental illness: study protocol. Bmc Health Services Research 2018;18:428+. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-3237-0.
Publication Place: England
Topic(s):
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Medical Home See topic collection
56
A cognitive behavioral therapy-based text messaging intervention for methamphetamine dependence
Type: Journal Article
Authors: Victoria Keoleian, Alex Stalcup, Douglas L. Polcin, Michelle Brown, Gantt Galloway
Year: 2013
Source:
Keoleian V, Stalcup A, Polcin DL, Brown M, Galloway G. A cognitive behavioral therapy-based text messaging intervention for methamphetamine dependence. Journal Of Psychoactive Drugs 2013;45:434-442, .
Topic(s):
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
,
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
57
A cohort study of the long-term impact of a fire disaster on the physical and mental health of adolescents
Type: Journal Article
Authors: T. Dorn, J. C. Yzermans, P. M. Spreeuwenberg, A. Schilder, J. van der Zee
Year: 2008
Source:
Dorn T, Yzermans JC, Spreeuwenberg PM, Schilder A, van der Zee J. A cohort study of the long-term impact of a fire disaster on the physical and mental health of adolescents. Journal Of Traumatic Stress 2008;21:239-242, . https://doi.org/10.1002/jts.20328.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: The literature on adult trauma survivors demonstrates that those exposed to traumatic stress have a poorer physical health status than nonexposed individuals. Studies on physical health effects in adolescent trauma survivors, in contrast, are scarce. In the current study, it was hypothesized that adolescents who have been involved in a mass burn incident (N = 124) will demonstrate more physical and mental health problems than an unaffected cohort from the same community (N = 1,487). Health data were extracted from electronic medical records, covering 1-year prefire and 4-years postfire. When compared to the prefire baseline, survivors showed significantly larger increases in mental, respiratory, and musculoskeletal problems than community controls during the first year after the fire, but not during the later years.
Topic(s):
HIT & Telehealth See topic collection
58
A collaborative approach for the care management of geropsychiatric services
Type: Journal Article
Authors: E. Aliberti, C. Basso, E. Schramm
Year: 2011
Source:
Aliberti E, Basso C, Schramm E. A collaborative approach for the care management of geropsychiatric services. Professional Case Management 2011;16:62-68; quiz 69-70, . https://doi.org/10.1097/NCM.0b013e318206a27b.
Publication Place: United States
Abstract: PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To share a successful collaborative approach between the medical and behavioral health departments of a managed care organization that improved both utilization rates and management for health plan members with dementia. PRIMARY PRACTICE SETTING: Acute care hospitals FINDINGS/CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant reduction in subsequent hospital admits, beddays, and emergency department visits for this population resulting in a substantial financial savings. Patient outcomes, as well as patient and caregiver satisfaction, was improved. IMPLICATIONS FOR CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: Prior to the implementation of this pilot, there was a gap in services for health plan members experiencing dangerous behavioral issues associated with their dementia diagnosis. Case management of this population was difficult because of the limited options available in our market area. This innovative program afforded a nontraditional approach to inpatient care that maximized case management possibilities for this population.
Topic(s):
Financing & Sustainability See topic collection
59
A collaborative approach to embedding graduate primary care mental health workers in the UK National Health Service
Type: Journal Article
Authors: J. Fletcher, M. Gavin, E. Harkness, L. Gask
Year: 2008
Source:
Fletcher J, Gavin M, Harkness E, Gask L. A collaborative approach to embedding graduate primary care mental health workers in the UK National Health Service. Health & Social Care In The Community 2008;16:451-459, . https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2524.2007.00754.x.
Publication Place: England
Abstract: The UK National Health Service (NHS) workforce has recently seen the arrival of the Graduate Mental Health Worker (GMHW) in primary care. We established a Quality Improvement Collaborative to assist in embedding this new workforce in one Strategic Health Authority Area of England. The intervention utilised 'collaborative' technology which involves bringing together groups of practitioners from different organizations to work in a structured way to improve the quality of their service. The process was evaluated by an action research project in which all stakeholders participated. Data collection was primarily qualitative. During the project, there was an increase in throughput of new patients seen by the GMHWs and increased workforce satisfaction with a sense that the collaborative aided the change process within the organizations. Involvement of managers and commissioners from the Primary Care Trusts where the GMHWs were employed appeared to be important in achieving change. This was not, however, sufficient to combat significant attrition of the first cohort of workers. The project identified several barriers to the successful implementation of a new workforce for mental health problems in primary care, including widespread variation in the level and quality of supervision and in payment and terms of service of workers. A collaborative approach can be used to support the development of new roles in health care; however, full engagement from management is particularly necessary for success in implementation. The problems faced by GMHWs reflect those faced by other new workers in healthcare settings, yet in some ways are even more disturbing given the lack of governance arrangements put in place to oversee these developments and the apparent use of relatively unsupported and inexperienced novices as agents of change in the NHS.
Topic(s):
Education & Workforce See topic collection
60
A collaborative approach to the treatment of pregnant women with opioid use disorders
Type: Government Report
Authors: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Year: 2016
Source:
Administration SA and MHS. A collaborative approach to the treatment of pregnant women with opioid use disorders 2016;(SMA) 16-4978.
Publication Place: Rockville, MD
Topic(s):
Grey Literature See topic collection
,
Healthcare Disparities See topic collection
,
Healthcare Policy See topic collection
,
Opioids & Substance Use See topic collection
Disclaimer:

This grey literature reference is included in the Academy's Literature Collection in keeping with our mission to gather all sources of information on integration. Grey literature is comprised of materials that are not made available through traditional publishing avenues. Often, the information from unpublished resources can be limited and the risk of bias cannot be determined.